534

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Research for REGI Committee - Cross-border cooperation in healthcare

26-10-2021

This study analyses the role of Cohesion Policy as regards cross-border cooperation in healthcare, with a particular focus on the 2014-2020 Interreg V-A programmes. It also reviews the issue of governance related to such projects and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, it identifies possible solutions and puts forward policy recommendations to facilitate patient and healthcare staff flows, to improve the cross-border supply of healthcare and to support cross-border mutual development.

This study analyses the role of Cohesion Policy as regards cross-border cooperation in healthcare, with a particular focus on the 2014-2020 Interreg V-A programmes. It also reviews the issue of governance related to such projects and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, it identifies possible solutions and puts forward policy recommendations to facilitate patient and healthcare staff flows, to improve the cross-border supply of healthcare and to support cross-border mutual development.

Ekstern forfatter

prof. Fabienne Leloup

Research for REGI Committee - Cohesion Policy and support to health

13-10-2021

As the EU’s main investment policy, Cohesion Policy can play a key role in promoting health and in reducing health inequalities. This briefing reviews the role of Cohesion Policy with regard to health in the 2014-2020 period and explores the prospects and challenges that lie ahead. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As the EU’s main investment policy, Cohesion Policy can play a key role in promoting health and in reducing health inequalities. This briefing reviews the role of Cohesion Policy with regard to health in the 2014-2020 period and explores the prospects and challenges that lie ahead. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Working towards a macro-regional strategy for the Mediterranean

11-10-2021

A rich tapestry of nations and cultures, the Mediterranean has always been a strategic area for the European Union (EU) and there is much mutual benefit to be garnered from closer cooperation with the countries of the southern and eastern Mediterranean. As a geographical region whose countries face many shared challenges given their joint proximity to a common sea, the idea of establishing a macro-regional strategy for the Mediterranean region has been present in EU discourse from the very beginning ...

A rich tapestry of nations and cultures, the Mediterranean has always been a strategic area for the European Union (EU) and there is much mutual benefit to be garnered from closer cooperation with the countries of the southern and eastern Mediterranean. As a geographical region whose countries face many shared challenges given their joint proximity to a common sea, the idea of establishing a macro-regional strategy for the Mediterranean region has been present in EU discourse from the very beginning, drawing support from institutions such as the European Committee of the Regions (CoR) and the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC), with Parliament also contributing. Discussions on the development of a macro-regional strategy in the Mediterranean have explored a variety of different scenarios, from an overarching strategy encompassing the whole region, to three separate macro-regional strategies or a combination of both approaches. Progress towards greater macro-regional cooperation in the region has, however, been slow. This situation has arguably been compounded by the challenges facing the region in general, which include issues such as digital transformation, climate change, migration and mobility, and environmental protection. Whereas a large number of territorial cooperation initiatives have developed over the years to help countries work together to address these issues, the developmental differences between the countries of the Mediterranean are such that the priorities of the countries of the southern Mediterranean differ significantly from those of their northern neighbours, making it difficult to agree on a set of common priorities for a possible macro-regional strategy in the Mediterranean. This lack of consensus could ultimately prove to be the most difficult challenge of all. For while the European Council remains open to new macro-regional strategies, the lack of any agreement among the countries concerned regarding priorities or indeed geographical scope raises serious questions as to the prospects for the implementation of a macro-regional strategy for the Mediterranean.

The European Green Deal and cohesion policy

08-10-2021

In line with its commitments under the Paris Agreement on climate change, in 2019 the EU adopted an ambitious strategy for reaching climate neutrality by 2050: the European Green Deal. The significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions needed to achieve it will require profound social and economic changes, while ensuring a socially fair and just transition. As climate change is linked to the greenhouse effect, the EU's actions for reducing emissions involve greening high-emissions sectors such ...

In line with its commitments under the Paris Agreement on climate change, in 2019 the EU adopted an ambitious strategy for reaching climate neutrality by 2050: the European Green Deal. The significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions needed to achieve it will require profound social and economic changes, while ensuring a socially fair and just transition. As climate change is linked to the greenhouse effect, the EU's actions for reducing emissions involve greening high-emissions sectors such as fossil fuels-based energy, transport, agriculture, manufacturing and waste management. Triggered by climate change, heatwaves, water stress, wildfires, coastal flooding and extreme weather events affect EU regions with varying degrees of severity and will require a tailored approach to mitigation. The transition towards climate neutrality cannot be achieved through environmental policies alone. Cohesion policy, which accounts for about one third of the EU budget, supports this process by earmarking funding for climate action, for 'climate proofing' investments and for implementing specific actions in EU regions. In addition to the traditional cohesion policy funds (European Regional Development Fund, Cohesion Fund and European Social Fund Plus), a new Just Transition Fund will support the transition in regions relying on fossil fuels and high-emissions industries over the period of 2021-2027. Moreover, one out of the five cohesion policy objectives in the current funding period is entirely dedicated to a greener Europe and fosters investment in clean energy, the circular economy, climate change mitigation and sustainable transport. As the main goal of cohesion policy is to prevent the widening of disparities, it can thus help support those regions that bear the heaviest burden of the transition and make sure that no region is left behind. Local and regional authorities across the EU are also working together to tackle climate challenges by participating in the European Climate Pact and in initiatives such as the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, Mayors Alliance for the European Green Deal, and Green Deal Going Local.

Cities in a globalised world: Exploring trends and the effect on urban resilience

07-10-2021

Cities are inevitably affected by shocks and disruptions, the pandemic being a case in point. The extent of the impact however depends on cities' preparedness and capacity to adapt. By thinking ahead, cities can explore emerging or plausible developments in order to anticipate them and contain potential disruption. Drawing on a report prepared by the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), this EPRS paper explores the impact on and implications for cities of current global trends, such ...

Cities are inevitably affected by shocks and disruptions, the pandemic being a case in point. The extent of the impact however depends on cities' preparedness and capacity to adapt. By thinking ahead, cities can explore emerging or plausible developments in order to anticipate them and contain potential disruption. Drawing on a report prepared by the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), this EPRS paper explores the impact on and implications for cities of current global trends, such as climate change, population growth, urbanisation, economic growth, increasing energy demand, higher connectivity and a changing world order, that will have direct consequences for the future of cities and their inhabitants.

European Regional Development Fund and Cohesion Fund 2021-2027

23-09-2021

In the context of the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF) on 29 May 2018. The new single regulation on the ERDF and CF (previously covered by two separate regulations) identifies the specific objectives and scope of support for both funds, including non-eligible activities. The majority of ERDF funding will focus on smart growth and the green economy ...

In the context of the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF) on 29 May 2018. The new single regulation on the ERDF and CF (previously covered by two separate regulations) identifies the specific objectives and scope of support for both funds, including non-eligible activities. The majority of ERDF funding will focus on smart growth and the green economy, while the fund will also support other activities such as connectivity, social issues and local development. The CF will continue to focus predominantly on environmental and transport infrastructure. Special provisions were proposed for territories such as urban areas and outermost regions. The indicator framework for monitoring progress will include new common results indicators. On 28 May 2020, the Commission amended the proposal to better support recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. A final political trilogue meeting took place on 9 February 2021, sealing agreement between the Council and the European Parliament. The Parliament voted on the draft regulation at its June II plenary session. The final act was signed 24 June and published in the Official Journal on 30 June 2021. Fifth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common Provisions Regulation: New rules for cohesion policy for 2021-2027

20-09-2021

For the EU budget covering the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed to update EU cohesion policy with a new set of rules. The proposal for a Common Provisions Regulation (CPR) set out common provisions for eight shared management funds: the European Regional Development Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Social Fund Plus, the Just Transition Fund, the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, the Asylum and Migration Fund, the Internal Security Fund and the Border Management and Visa ...

For the EU budget covering the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed to update EU cohesion policy with a new set of rules. The proposal for a Common Provisions Regulation (CPR) set out common provisions for eight shared management funds: the European Regional Development Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Social Fund Plus, the Just Transition Fund, the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, the Asylum and Migration Fund, the Internal Security Fund and the Border Management and Visa Instrument. Additional specific regulations add certain provisions needed to cater for the particularities of individual funds, in order to take into account their different rationales, target groups and implementation methods. The new CPR is of the utmost importance as it sets the main rules that govern the above-mentioned funds for the 2021-2027 period. While it builds upon the previous sets of rules covering the 2014-2020 period, it nevertheless introduces a number of innovations. It aims, amongst other things, to simplify and improve synergies between the different EU policy tools. On 23 June 2021, the Parliament voted to adopt the text of the regulation agreed with the Council. The final act was published in the Official Journal on 30 June 2021. Fifth edition of a briefing originally drafted by Vasileios Margaras. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European territorial cooperation (Interreg) 2021-2027

20-09-2021

On 29 May 2018, the European Commission adopted several proposals aimed at defining the EU cohesion policy for the post-2020 programming period. The package includes a proposal for the new generation of European territorial cooperation (ETC) programmes, commonly referred to as 'Interreg'. The proposed regulation would bring significant changes to the architecture of ETC, with the reshaping of the three traditional cooperation strands (i.e. cross-border, transnational and interregional cooperation ...

On 29 May 2018, the European Commission adopted several proposals aimed at defining the EU cohesion policy for the post-2020 programming period. The package includes a proposal for the new generation of European territorial cooperation (ETC) programmes, commonly referred to as 'Interreg'. The proposed regulation would bring significant changes to the architecture of ETC, with the reshaping of the three traditional cooperation strands (i.e. cross-border, transnational and interregional cooperation) and the creation of two new components, one dedicated to outermost regions, the other to interregional cooperation on innovation. Another major novelty is the incorporation of cooperation with countries other than EU Member States. The proposal was examined simultaneously by the Council and the European Parliament. In Parliament, the Committee on Regional Development (REGI) was responsible for the file. Parliament adopted its legislative resolution on the proposal at first reading on 26 March 2019, enabling trilogue negotiations to get under way with the Council. Agreement on the text was reached at the trilogue meeting of 2 December 2020, with Parliament adopting the draft regulation on 23 June 2021. Signed on 24 June 2021, the final act was published in the EU Official Journal on 30 June 2021.

Just Transition Fund

20-09-2021

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55 % by 2030 and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. This will require a socio-economic transformation in regions relying on fossil fuels and high-emission industries. As part of the European Green Deal, on 14 January 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation to create the Just Transition Fund, aimed at supporting EU regions most affected by the transition to a low carbon economy. In the context of recovery from the coronavirus ...

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55 % by 2030 and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. This will require a socio-economic transformation in regions relying on fossil fuels and high-emission industries. As part of the European Green Deal, on 14 January 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation to create the Just Transition Fund, aimed at supporting EU regions most affected by the transition to a low carbon economy. In the context of recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, an amended proposal on the Just Transition Fund (JTF) was published on 28 May 2020. The JTF is set to have a budget of €17.5 billion (€7.5 billion from the core EU budget under the Multiannual Financial Framework and €10 billion from the Next Generation EU instrument, in 2018 prices). Funding will be available to all Member States, while focusing on regions with the biggest transition challenges. The budget for the Just Transition Fund may be complemented with resources from cohesion policy funds and national co financing. The Fund will be part of a Just Transition Mechanism, which also includes resources under InvestEU and a public-sector loan facility. In the European Parliament, the file was entrusted to the Committee on Regional Development (REGI). A provisional political agreement was reached in trilogue on 9 December 2020, with the Parliament adopting the draft regulation on 18 May 2021. The final act was published in the Official Journal on 30 June 2021. Fifth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Research for REGI Committee - Artificial Intelligence and Urban Development

15-09-2021

This At a glance note summarises the research paper that explores the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in urban areas, and its impact on socio-economic and territorial cohesion. The research paper argues that expectations surrounding AI are high, especially in the context of smart-city initiatives, but that the actual benefits are yet to be fully assessed. To avoid potential risks, local and urban authorities need to fulfil a series of conditions that are inherently challenging. The EU’s AI Policy ...

This At a glance note summarises the research paper that explores the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in urban areas, and its impact on socio-economic and territorial cohesion. The research paper argues that expectations surrounding AI are high, especially in the context of smart-city initiatives, but that the actual benefits are yet to be fully assessed. To avoid potential risks, local and urban authorities need to fulfil a series of conditions that are inherently challenging. The EU’s AI Policy and its Cohesion Policy, in particular, may help, but they need to address the territorial dimension of AI more explicitly.

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