The Composition of Russia’s new Cabinet and Presidential Administration, and its Significance

13-06-2012

The new Russian government represents a compromise between Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev. Although the latter had to step aside last September and relinquish the presidency, he was given more latitude to assemble the cabinet of ministers than in 2008. The new Russian power configuration following the recent reshuffle is more complex than it was previously. There are in fact now more centres of decision-making. The division of labour between the president and the prime minister will not necessarily correspond to the letter of the constitution. One of the key questions at the moment is the role that the president’s new aides and advisors will play. The emergence of a 'parallel cabinet' in the Kremlin would complicate the decision-making system and would leave Dmitry Medvedev in a weaker position. The situation in Moscow is rapidly changing. The authorities appear to be sending conflicting signals. While Dmitry Medvedev had made some concessions in December on the election of the governors and the registration of political parties, we note that in the last several weeks he has been tempted to backpedal.

The new Russian government represents a compromise between Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev. Although the latter had to step aside last September and relinquish the presidency, he was given more latitude to assemble the cabinet of ministers than in 2008. The new Russian power configuration following the recent reshuffle is more complex than it was previously. There are in fact now more centres of decision-making. The division of labour between the president and the prime minister will not necessarily correspond to the letter of the constitution. One of the key questions at the moment is the role that the president’s new aides and advisors will play. The emergence of a 'parallel cabinet' in the Kremlin would complicate the decision-making system and would leave Dmitry Medvedev in a weaker position. The situation in Moscow is rapidly changing. The authorities appear to be sending conflicting signals. While Dmitry Medvedev had made some concessions in December on the election of the governors and the registration of political parties, we note that in the last several weeks he has been tempted to backpedal.

Externe Autor

Arnaud DUBIEN (IRIS, Belgium)