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European Medicines Agency mandate extension

Auf einen Blick 01-07-2021

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to strengthen the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The proposed regulation would allow the EMA, among other things, to better anticipate possible shortages of medicinal products and ensure their timely development, with the aim of improving the EU's capacity to respond to health emergencies. The European Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted its report on 22 June 2021. This is due to be voted ...

Since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, the EU has been entitled to support, coordinate or complement Member States’ activities in sport. European sports policies of the past decade are characterised by numerous activities and by on-going differentiation. Against this backdrop, the study presents policy options in four key areas: the first covers the need for stronger coordination; the second aims at the setting of thematic priorities; the third addresses the reinforcement of the role of ...

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action ...

This EPRS paper analyses progress in attaining the policy agenda set out by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, and her College of Commissioners when they took office in December 2019. It looks in particular at the state of play in respect of delivery on the six key priorities asserted at that time and at how they have since been affected by the impact of the coronavirus crisis. The evidence so far suggests that, rather than undermine their original agenda or knock it badly ...

In a rapidly evolving pandemic, it is fundamental to ensure consistency of definitions across Member States to provide the necessary comparability to evaluate the public health response, the stress on the health system and the impact on the population’s health. All institutional bodies in the Member States follow, or base their approaches, on technical guidance by the European Centre for Diseases and Control (ECDC). The approach to defining possible and probable cases shows considerable heterogeneity ...

As the coronavirus crisis shows no sign of abating globally, many governments around the world face tough choices between easing virus containment measures, in order to allow economic recovery, or keeping these measures in place, to protect their citizens’ health and their healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. They have launched vast financial programmes to support vulnerable households and the newly unemployed, backed banks to keep credit flowing in the economy, and strengthened healthcare ...

The coronavirus pandemic has put European health systems under enormous strain, revealing gaps in the way public health emergencies are addressed. The European Commission's proposal for a new EU Health programme, EU4Health, aims to fill these gaps. During the European Parliament's July plenary session, the Commission and the Council are to make statements on the EU's public health strategy after coronavirus, followed by a debate with Members. A resolution is due to be voted later in the week.

The novel coronavirus outbreak is an unprecedented public health crisis with far-reaching consequences. It has highlighted the EU’s long-existing structural problems related to the supply of medicines, and the dependency on third-country import for certain essential and critical medicines and ingredients. While public health policy, including the organisation of the delivery of healthcare and the sales of medicines remains in the competence of the Member States, it has also become clear that cooperation ...

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared Covid-19, the disease resulting from the novel coronavirus SARS-COV2, a pandemic on 11 March 2020, putting the United Nations (UN) agency in the global spotlight. The WHO is coordinating international efforts to fight the virus, for example by issuing guidelines on preventing and treating the disease, and coordinating research into testing and vaccines. Critics argue that the WHO was overly accommodating of China, and as a result failed to handle the pandemic ...

Addressing shortages of medicines

Briefing 28-04-2020

Medicines shortages have been a growing problem in the European Union (EU) in recent years. As the coronavirus outbreak unfolds, the risk of bottlenecks in the supply of medicines to patients has become particularly high. More broadly, problems with the availability of, and access to, new medicines – most frequently associated with high-priced medicines – have also been a central topic in political debates for some time now. The causes underlying medicines shortages are complex and multi-dimensional ...