23

Ergebnis(se)

Wort/Wörter
Art der Veröffentlichung
Politikbereich
Verfasser
Schlagwortliste
Datum

Multiannual financial framework for the years 2021 to 2027: The future of EU finances

29-01-2021

As of 1 January 2021, the new multiannual financial framework (MFF) that details the structure of EU finances up to 2027 started to apply, following publication of the MFF Regulation in the Official Journal. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the lengthy negotiations in the Council and European Council gained momentum when they became intertwined with the debate on the Next Generation EU recovery instrument. The European Parliament, which gave its consent on 16 December 2020, managed to obtain ...

As of 1 January 2021, the new multiannual financial framework (MFF) that details the structure of EU finances up to 2027 started to apply, following publication of the MFF Regulation in the Official Journal. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the lengthy negotiations in the Council and European Council gained momentum when they became intertwined with the debate on the Next Generation EU recovery instrument. The European Parliament, which gave its consent on 16 December 2020, managed to obtain various changes it had strongly advocated, such as additional resources for flagship programmes and increased flexibility.

Single market, innovation and digital: Heading 1 of the 2021-2027 MFF

27-01-2020

The European Union's long-term budget, the multiannual financial framework (MFF), sets out the maximum annual amounts of spending for a seven-year period. It is structured around the EU's spending priorities, reflected in broad categories of expenditure or 'headings'. Heading 1 – Single market, innovation and digital – is one of the seven headings in the MFF proposed by the European Commission for the new 2021-2027 financial period. The heading covers spending in four policy areas: research and innovation ...

The European Union's long-term budget, the multiannual financial framework (MFF), sets out the maximum annual amounts of spending for a seven-year period. It is structured around the EU's spending priorities, reflected in broad categories of expenditure or 'headings'. Heading 1 – Single market, innovation and digital – is one of the seven headings in the MFF proposed by the European Commission for the new 2021-2027 financial period. The heading covers spending in four policy areas: research and innovation, European strategic investments, single market, and space. The Commission, with a view to matching the budget to the EU's political ambitions, is proposing an overall amount of €166.3 billion (in 2018 prices) for this heading, representing 14.7 % of the MFF proposal. However, the new Commission's six priorities for 2019-2024 could have a budgetary impact on this heading, in particular the support for investment in green technologies and a cleaner private and public transport, which are among the actions included in the European Green Deal, and efforts to enable Europe to make the most of the potential of the digital age. This briefing presents the structure and budget allocation of Heading 1 and compares it with the current MFF. It describes each policy cluster and compares the Commission's budgetary proposal with the European Parliament's negotiating position and the negotiating box presented by the Finnish Presidency in December 2019. It then explores some considerations that could contribute to the forthcoming budgetary negotiations on the 2021-2027 MFF.

The 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework in figures

24-01-2020

The Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) sets the maximum level of resources (‘ceiling’) for each major category (‘heading’) of EU spending for a period of seven years. In addition to a financial plan, it sets the EU’s long-term priorities. With the 2014-2020 MFF nearing its end, the EU is now in negotiations on the next long-term budget. In May 2018, the European Commission presented a package of legislative proposals for the 2021-2027 MFF. Equivalent to 1.11 % of EU-27 gross national income (GNI ...

The Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) sets the maximum level of resources (‘ceiling’) for each major category (‘heading’) of EU spending for a period of seven years. In addition to a financial plan, it sets the EU’s long-term priorities. With the 2014-2020 MFF nearing its end, the EU is now in negotiations on the next long-term budget. In May 2018, the European Commission presented a package of legislative proposals for the 2021-2027 MFF. Equivalent to 1.11 % of EU-27 gross national income (GNI), it takes into account the initiatives to which the Member States committed in the Bratislava and Rome declarations, as well as the loss of a major contributor due to the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU. The European Parliament considers the proposal insufficient, given all commitments and priorities, and estimates that the MFF ceiling should amount to 1.3 % of EU-27 GNI. The Member States’ views on both the size and other aspects of the future MFF diverge, and the Council has not yet agreed its position. EU leaders are expected to take the next important decisions on the matter during the first half of 2020. The resources proposed for the 2021-2027 MFF are distributed across seven headings, representing the EU’s long-term priorities. They include spending programmes and funds that are the basis for the implementation of the EU budget. Our infographic provides a breakdown of the proposals for each of the seven headings, as well as an indication of the changes from the current MFF (2014-2027) represented by both the Commission's proposal and Parliament's position on that proposal.

Financing EU security and defence: Heading 5 of the 2021-2027 MFF

23-01-2020

For the new 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF), the European Commission proposes to dedicate a separate heading to security and defence – Heading 5. Although the European Union (EU) has already financed action linked to security and defence, this is the first time that this policy area has been so visibly underlined in the EU budget structure. With an allocation of €24 323 million (in 2018 prices), Heading 5 is the smallest of the seven MFF headings and represents 2.1 % of the total ...

For the new 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF), the European Commission proposes to dedicate a separate heading to security and defence – Heading 5. Although the European Union (EU) has already financed action linked to security and defence, this is the first time that this policy area has been so visibly underlined in the EU budget structure. With an allocation of €24 323 million (in 2018 prices), Heading 5 is the smallest of the seven MFF headings and represents 2.1 % of the total MFF. Heading 5 'Security and Defence' under the new MFF consists of three 'policy clusters': security, (policy cluster number 12), defence (13) and crisis response (14). The programmes and funds proposed for Heading 5 consist of old and new initiatives. They include the continuation of the current Internal Security Fund – Police instrument, funding for nuclear decommissioning and the Union Civil Protection Mechanism (rescEU). The European Defence Fund and the military mobility programme, which is a part of the Connecting Europe Facility, are new. The European Parliament position is supportive of the Commission proposal, with the exception of the allocation for nuclear decommissioning, which the Parliaments sees as insufficient. Even though the Council has not yet expressed its position on the 2021-2027 MFF, the Finnish EU Presidency contributed to the debate with its 'negotiation box' that proposed severe cuts to Heading 5, down to €16 491 million. The European Parliament reaction to this reduction is negative.

Financing EU external action in the new MFF, 2021-2027: Heading 6 'Neighbourhood and the World'

13-11-2019

In May 2018, the European Commission published its proposals for the new multiannual financial framework (MFF), the EU's seven-year budget for the 2021-2027 period, followed by proposals for the MFF's individual sectoral programmes. In the proposals, financing external action is covered under Heading 6, 'Neighbourhood and the World', which replaces the current Heading 4, 'Global Europe'. Taking into account the evolving context both internationally and within the EU, as well as the conclusions of ...

In May 2018, the European Commission published its proposals for the new multiannual financial framework (MFF), the EU's seven-year budget for the 2021-2027 period, followed by proposals for the MFF's individual sectoral programmes. In the proposals, financing external action is covered under Heading 6, 'Neighbourhood and the World', which replaces the current Heading 4, 'Global Europe'. Taking into account the evolving context both internationally and within the EU, as well as the conclusions of the current MFF's mid-term review, the Commission has proposed changes to the EU external action budget in order to make it simpler and more flexible, and to enable the EU to engage more strategically with its partner countries in the future. The proposed Heading 6 comes with increased resources and important structural changes. It envisages merging the majority of the current stand-alone external financing instruments into a single one – the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – as well as integrating into it the biggest EU external financing fund – the European Development Fund – currently outside the budget. Another proposed novelty is to set up an off-budget instrument – the European Peace Facility – to fund security and defence-related actions. With these changes, the Commission strives to take into account, among other things, the need for the EU to align its actions with its new and renewed international commitments under the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, the Paris Climate Agreement, the new EU Global Strategy, the European Consensus on Development, the European Neighbourhood Policy, and to make EU added value, relevance and credibility more visible. Negotiations on the 2021-2027 MFF are under way. The final decision is to be taken by the Council, acting by unanimity, with the European Parliament's consent. However, in view of current political realities and the financial implications of the UK's withdrawal from the EU, the adoption of a modern budget for the future remains a challenge that is not limited to Heading 6. Further developments are expected by the end of 2019.

Mehrjähriger Finanzrahmen 2021–2027 und neue Eigenmittel: Analyse des Vorschlags der Kommission

26-07-2018

Das Verfahren zur Verhandlung eines neuen siebenjährigen Finanzplans für die EU wurde nun offiziell mit der Veröffentlichung der Vorschläge der Kommission für einen mehrjährigen Finanzrahmen (MFR) 2021–2027 und ein neues Eigenmittelsystem, mit dem die Einnahmen zur Finanzierung des Finanzrahmens generiert werden sollen, eröffnet. Die vorliegende Analyse stellt den vorgeschlagenen neuen MFR und das Eigenmittelsystem vor und bietet einen Abgleich mit dem Status quo sowie den Prioritäten, die das Europäische ...

Das Verfahren zur Verhandlung eines neuen siebenjährigen Finanzplans für die EU wurde nun offiziell mit der Veröffentlichung der Vorschläge der Kommission für einen mehrjährigen Finanzrahmen (MFR) 2021–2027 und ein neues Eigenmittelsystem, mit dem die Einnahmen zur Finanzierung des Finanzrahmens generiert werden sollen, eröffnet. Die vorliegende Analyse stellt den vorgeschlagenen neuen MFR und das Eigenmittelsystem vor und bietet einen Abgleich mit dem Status quo sowie den Prioritäten, die das Europäische Parlament in seinen im Frühjahr 2018 angenommenen Entschließungen zum Ausdruck gebracht hat.

Post-2020 MFF and own resources: Ahead of the Commission's proposal

27-04-2018

On 2 May, the Commission is expected to publish proposals for a new multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the European Union for the years after 2020, as well as for a new system of own resources (OR) to provide the EU with the means to finance its annual budgets. The following day the proposals are to be presented to the Parliament's Committee on Budgets (BUDG).The proposals are being published as a package, and will be followed by a series of further legislative proposals for individual spending ...

On 2 May, the Commission is expected to publish proposals for a new multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the European Union for the years after 2020, as well as for a new system of own resources (OR) to provide the EU with the means to finance its annual budgets. The following day the proposals are to be presented to the Parliament's Committee on Budgets (BUDG).The proposals are being published as a package, and will be followed by a series of further legislative proposals for individual spending programmes to appear later in May and in June. The next MFF and OR system will set the EU's priorities and determine much of its scope for action for a period of at least five years. The proposals are an opportunity for the Commission to respond to a set of longstanding issues concerning how the EU finances its priorities, and to new issues arising from a political landscape that has changed profoundly since 2013, when the EU last negotiated its multiannual budget plan. Chief among these are the twin pressures affecting both the revenue and spending sides of the budget: the loss of a major net contributor country in the departure from the EU of the United Kingdom; and growing pressure to respond to new challenges mainly linked to the refugee and migration crisis that erupted after the current MFF was put in place, as well as ongoing issues resulting from the financial and sovereign debt crises. The Commission's proposals for a new MFF and OR will also respond to the question of how big the EU budget should be. Currently subject to a political cap of 1 % of the EU's GNI, the EU budget is modest in comparison with the government budgets of the EU's Member States. Nevertheless, negotiations over whether to increase this cap will be politically fraught in a context where some Member States are under pressure to reduce national budget deficits. Other issues at stake in the negotiations are the flexibility, conditionalities, structure and duration of the next MFF, and the sensitive question of whether to increase the EU's financial autonomy by endowing it with new and significant own resources.

Ergebnisorientierte Haushaltsplanung: Ein Mittel zur Verbesserung der EU-Ausgabenpolitik

16-03-2018

2015 rief die Europäische Kommission eine Initiative mit der Bezeichnung „Ein ergebnisorientierter EU-Haushalt“ ins Leben. Ihr Ziel besteht darin, die Ausgabenmentalität zu verändern und Ergebnisse zu einer horizontalen Priorität für den EU-Haushaltsplan zu machen. Die Initiative basiert auf einer beliebten modernen Haushaltsplanungsmethode, die als „ergebnisorientierte Haushaltsplanung“ bekannt ist. In diesem Papier werden die Methode und ihre Anwendung auf den EU-Haushaltsplan dargestellt. Es wird ...

2015 rief die Europäische Kommission eine Initiative mit der Bezeichnung „Ein ergebnisorientierter EU-Haushalt“ ins Leben. Ihr Ziel besteht darin, die Ausgabenmentalität zu verändern und Ergebnisse zu einer horizontalen Priorität für den EU-Haushaltsplan zu machen. Die Initiative basiert auf einer beliebten modernen Haushaltsplanungsmethode, die als „ergebnisorientierte Haushaltsplanung“ bekannt ist. In diesem Papier werden die Methode und ihre Anwendung auf den EU-Haushaltsplan dargestellt. Es wird erklärt, warum die ergebnisorientierte Haushaltsplanung, obwohl sie nicht einfach umzusetzen ist, als reizvolle Möglichkeit zur Verbesserung des Preis-Leistungs-Verhältnisses und zur Erhöhung der Transparenz und Steigerung der demokratischen Rechenschaftspflicht in Bezug auf die öffentlichen Finanzen angesehen wird. Zudem wird in dem Papier analysiert, welche Entwicklung der Ansatz der ergebnisorientierten Haushaltsplanung innerhalb des EU-Haushaltssystems genommen hat und welche Herausforderungen und Hindernisse für seine Umsetzung noch bestehen. Das Engagement der Europäischen Kommission für die Grundsätze der ergebnisorientierten Haushaltsplanung sowie die breite Unterstützung der Idee, die vom Europäischen Parlament und vom Rat zum Ausdruck gebracht wurde, geben Grund zur Annahme, dass diese Bemühungen auch unter dem mehrjährigen Finanzrahmen nach 2020 fortgeführt werden.

Mehrjähriger Finanzrahmen für die Zeit nach 2020

06-03-2018

Die Kommission wird voraussichtlich im Mai 2018 einen Vorschlag über einen neuen mehrjährigen Finanzrahmen (MFR) für die Zeit nach 2020 sowie Vorschläge über die Reform des Eigenmittelsystems annehmen. Der Haushaltsausschuss des Parlaments (BUDG) hat einen Initiativbericht mit seinem Standpunkt zum künftigen MFR sowie einen entsprechenden Bericht zur Reform der Eigenmittel angenommen. Beide Berichte sollen auf der Plenartagung im März erörtert werden. Sie enthalten die Sichtweise des Parlaments zu ...

Die Kommission wird voraussichtlich im Mai 2018 einen Vorschlag über einen neuen mehrjährigen Finanzrahmen (MFR) für die Zeit nach 2020 sowie Vorschläge über die Reform des Eigenmittelsystems annehmen. Der Haushaltsausschuss des Parlaments (BUDG) hat einen Initiativbericht mit seinem Standpunkt zum künftigen MFR sowie einen entsprechenden Bericht zur Reform der Eigenmittel angenommen. Beide Berichte sollen auf der Plenartagung im März erörtert werden. Sie enthalten die Sichtweise des Parlaments zu der Einnahmen- und Ausgabenseite des EU-Haushalts, die seiner Ansicht nach in den anstehenden Verhandlungen als Einheit betrachtet werden sollte.

Der Europäische Rat und der mehrjährige Finanzrahmen

21-02-2018

Mit dem Inkrafttreten des Vertrags von Lissabon erhielt der MFR zum ersten Mal eine Rechtsgrundlage in den EU-Verträgen und für seine Annahme wurde ein neues Verfahren eingeführt. Der MFR ist heute in einer Verordnung festgelegt, die der Rat gemäß einem besonderen Gesetzgebungsverfahren und nach Zustimmung des Europäischen Parlaments annimmt. Bei der Festlegung des MFR für die Zeit nach 2020 wird dieses neue Verfahren nach den Verhandlungen über den MFR 2014–2020 zum zweiten Mal vollständig angewendet ...

Mit dem Inkrafttreten des Vertrags von Lissabon erhielt der MFR zum ersten Mal eine Rechtsgrundlage in den EU-Verträgen und für seine Annahme wurde ein neues Verfahren eingeführt. Der MFR ist heute in einer Verordnung festgelegt, die der Rat gemäß einem besonderen Gesetzgebungsverfahren und nach Zustimmung des Europäischen Parlaments annimmt. Bei der Festlegung des MFR für die Zeit nach 2020 wird dieses neue Verfahren nach den Verhandlungen über den MFR 2014–2020 zum zweiten Mal vollständig angewendet. Im Vertrag von Lissabon wurde der Europäische Rat auch zu einem der sieben Organe der Europäischen Union bestimmt, und seine Rolle und Befugnisse wurden festgelegt. Gemäß Artikel 15 Absatz 1 EUV gibt der „Europäische Rat [...] der Union die für ihre Entwicklung erforderlichen Impulse und legt die allgemeinen politischen Zielvorstellungen und Prioritäten hierfür fest.“ Ferner wird der Europäische Rat „nicht gesetzgeberisch tätig“. Trotz dieses Verbots der Ausübung gesetzgeberischer Aufgaben und obwohl dem Europäischen Rat in den Finanzvorschriften der Verträge (Artikel 310 bis 324 AEUV) keine offizielle Rolle zugewiesen wird, spielte er – wie dies bereits vor dem Vertrag von Lissabon der Fall – bei den Verhandlungen über den MFR 2014–2020 eine zentrale Rolle. Auf der Grundlage seiner Aufgabe, die „allgemeinen politischen Zielvorstellungen und Prioritäten“ festzulegen, nahm der Europäische Rat ausführliche Schlussfolgerungen zum MFR an, mit denen die Obergrenzen des MFR und die Finanzausstattung aller Politikbereiche für den siebenjährigen Zeitraum des MFR bestimmt werden sollten. Das Europäische Parlament betrachtete in seiner Entschließung vom 15. April 2014 zu den Verhandlungen über den MFR 2014–2020: Erkenntnisse und weiteres Vorgehen die Auswirkungen der Beteiligung des Europäischen Rats auf die Befugnisse des Parlaments als besonders besorgniserregend. Die Aspekte, die bei der Bewertung des MFR und seines Verhandlungsprozesses am häufigsten betrachtet werden, sind der Gesamtumfang des Haushalts, Eigenmittel, nationale Verhandlungspositionen und die Spannungen zwischen Nettoempfänger- und Nettozahlerländern. Der Rolle des Europäischen Rates wurde bislang nur wenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. In diesem Briefing werden die Mitwirkung des Europäischen Rates am Prozess der Annahme des MFR 2014–2020 während der einzelnen Verhandlungsphasen untersucht und die Bedenken des Europäischen Parlaments in dieser Hinsicht dargestellt. Ferner werden ein vorläufiger Zeitplan und mögliche Etappenziele für die Verhandlungen über den MFR nach 2020 vorgelegt und die mögliche Rolle des Europäisches Rates bei diesem Prozess beleuchtet; damit wird der Versuch einer ersten Bewertung möglicher Gemeinsamkeiten mit und Unterschiede zu den Verhandlungen über den MFR 2014–2020 unternommen.

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

04-03-2021
ICM International Women's Day 2021
Andere Veranstaltung -
FEMM
04-03-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Unpacking the latest Eurobarometer survey
Andere Veranstaltung -
EPRS
15-03-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with Vivien Schmidt: Legitimacy and power in the EU
Andere Veranstaltung -
EPRS

Partner