4

Ergebnis(se)

Wort/Wörter
Art der Veröffentlichung
Politikbereich
Verfasser
Schlagwortliste
Datum

Irrigation in EU agriculture

13-12-2019

Irrigation is the provision of water to help crops grow when rainfall is not sufficient. While new farming methods and technologies allow some types of crops to be grown without soil, a certain amount of water is needed to grow any kind of crop. In today's economy, agriculture is one of the sectors that consumes the most water resources. Irrigation is the major cause of water consumption in agriculture. It contributes to increasing crop productivity, but it is also a threat to the preservation of ...

Irrigation is the provision of water to help crops grow when rainfall is not sufficient. While new farming methods and technologies allow some types of crops to be grown without soil, a certain amount of water is needed to grow any kind of crop. In today's economy, agriculture is one of the sectors that consumes the most water resources. Irrigation is the major cause of water consumption in agriculture. It contributes to increasing crop productivity, but it is also a threat to the preservation of water resources. Therefore, the issue of water scarcity requires careful reflection on the trade-off between higher agricultural productivity and the deterioration of water resources. A number of elements determine the amount of irrigation water used in agriculture, from the types of crop and cropping method to the characteristics of the soil and the irrigation technique, to name just a few. Therefore, agriculture itself provides opportunities for better water management and water savings, through both traditional farm practices and new farming technologies. Irrigation has been a feature of European agriculture for thousands of years. Not surprisingly, the majority of irrigated agricultural areas are in the EU’s southern regions, in particular in Spain and Italy. However, there are areas equipped for irrigation elsewhere, especially in the Netherlands. Over 40 % of the EU's water use is on agriculture, and most of the freshwater abstraction is for agricultural use in countries like Greece, Spain, and Cyprus. Prolonged periods of drought in many parts of the Union, the effects of climate change and pollution, as well as competition over use add further pressure on EU waters. Ensuring food security in view of climate change requires improvement in water-management capacity, including making users (farmers) more responsible. In recent times, the environmental performance of sectoral policies, such as in the area of agriculture, is increasingly scrutinised by citizens, stakeholders, and policy-makers. Various EU policy initiatives have been launched to address the challenge of sustainable water use in agriculture, including a more integrated approach to water management, water re-use, research and innovation, and more environmental ambition in the agricultural policy. Better policy coordination between EU policies and actions is seen as key to achieving the sustainable safeguarding of EU waters.

Research for AGRI Committee - Structural Change in EU Farming: How Can the CAP Support a 21st Century European Model of Agriculture?

15-03-2016

This is the reference document of the Workshop on the "Effects of the structural changes on EU farming: How to better support the European model of agriculture of the 21st century with the CAP" of 14th March 2016, organised by the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (COMAGRI) and the Policy Department B (AGRI Research) of the European Parliament .It is structured in three parts: 1. Farm structural change in Western Europe and the CAP. 2. Farm structural change in Central and Eastern ...

This is the reference document of the Workshop on the "Effects of the structural changes on EU farming: How to better support the European model of agriculture of the 21st century with the CAP" of 14th March 2016, organised by the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (COMAGRI) and the Policy Department B (AGRI Research) of the European Parliament .It is structured in three parts: 1. Farm structural change in Western Europe and the CAP. 2. Farm structural change in Central and Eastern Europe and the CAP. 3. Food value chain in the EU - How to improve it and strengthen the bargaining power of farmers.

Externe Autor

Jan Douwe van der Ploeg, Flaminia Ventura, Pierluigi Milone, Szabolcs Biró, Gyula Dudás, Andrew Fieldsend, József Fogarasi, Eszter Hamza, Krisztina Miskó, Gyöngyi Kürthy, Norbert Potori, Katalin Rácz, Ildikó Tikász, Orsolya Tóth, Szabolcs Vágó, Edina Varga, Eszter Varga, Alessandro Sorrentino, Carlo Russo and Luca Cacchiarelli

Family Farming in Europe: Challenges and Prospects

15-04-2014

This note discusses the definitions, challenges and future prospects of family farming in the EU. Some challenges, such as market volatility and climate change, are general for all EU farm structures, but some are specific to family farmers: their smallness, lack of power within the food chain, and intergenerational farm succession. However, family farming – often by pluriactive and/or diversified households – is likely to continue to dominate EU farm structure in the foreseeable future, despite ...

This note discusses the definitions, challenges and future prospects of family farming in the EU. Some challenges, such as market volatility and climate change, are general for all EU farm structures, but some are specific to family farmers: their smallness, lack of power within the food chain, and intergenerational farm succession. However, family farming – often by pluriactive and/or diversified households – is likely to continue to dominate EU farm structure in the foreseeable future, despite trends towards larger family and non-family farms. Action at both EU and national policy levels could help towards a more sustainable and resilient family farm sector.

Externe Autor

Sophia DAVIDOVA (University of Kent) and Kenneth THOMSON (University of Aberdeen)

Rural Development and Territorial Cohesion in the New CAP

15-02-2012

This note examines the role of rural development in the CAP after 2013. It pays special attention to the way rural development might help to address the adverse effects of the economic crisis on rural areas. The note also discusses the possibilities of overcoming problems that threaten the legitimacy of rural development policy. It is argued that the attention given to competitiveness and innovation as generic concepts threatens to distort rural development in the 2014-2020 period. This will be especially ...

This note examines the role of rural development in the CAP after 2013. It pays special attention to the way rural development might help to address the adverse effects of the economic crisis on rural areas. The note also discusses the possibilities of overcoming problems that threaten the legitimacy of rural development policy. It is argued that the attention given to competitiveness and innovation as generic concepts threatens to distort rural development in the 2014-2020 period. This will be especially detrimental for territorial integration.

Externe Autor

Jan Douwe VAN DER PLOEG (University of Wageningen, the Netherland)

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

07-12-2020
Health and environmental impacts of 5G
Workshop -
STOA
07-12-2020
What role can trade policy play to advance the objectives of the Green Deal?
Anhörung -
INTA
07-12-2020
Public Hearing on Women's Rights Defenders
Anhörung -
FEMM

Partner