137

Ergebnis(se)

Wort/Wörter
Art der Veröffentlichung
Politikbereich
Verfasser
Datum

How the COVID-19 crisis has affected security and defence-related aspects for the EU

27-07-2020

This briefing examines the impact that the COVID-19 crisis has had on security and defence-related aspects for the European Union (EU) between December 2019 and June 2020. Based on this analysis, it identifies key problems or questions that require more attention from policymakers in the coming months and years. Four areas are singled out for analysis, as follows. Section (i), on the security environment and implications for strategy, discusses how COVID-19 tends to feed violent conflict and empowers ...

This briefing examines the impact that the COVID-19 crisis has had on security and defence-related aspects for the European Union (EU) between December 2019 and June 2020. Based on this analysis, it identifies key problems or questions that require more attention from policymakers in the coming months and years. Four areas are singled out for analysis, as follows. Section (i), on the security environment and implications for strategy, discusses how COVID-19 tends to feed violent conflict and empowers non-state actors, but also highlights new opportunities to make cease-fires stick. It makes the case for examining in what areas and through what steps Europe can strengthen its self-reliance, unity and strategic leadership capability amidst the growing risk of great power competition. Section (ii), on Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) and defence-related mechanisms, capabilities and resources, identifies the growing risk to Europe’s defence budget, capabilities and ambitions and suggests a number of ways in which Member States can manage these risks through fiscal measures, greater prioritisation and collaboration. Section (iii) highlights the multi-faceted positive contributions that the armed forces have made to support civilian authorities at home, but suggests substantial untapped potential to do more in future emergencies. It makes the case for analysing the long-term implications of COVID-19 on readiness and generating forces for overseas operations. Section (iv), on the different ways CSDP operations and missions have been affected by COVID-19 and the ways in which they have adapted to support host countries, makes the case for tackling pre-existing problems with staffing of missions and the resilience of missions to infectious diseases. It also recommends reviewing the rationale and scope for what might be termed ‘health diplomacy’.

Externe Autor

Christoph O. Meyer, Sophia Besch, Prof. Martin Bricknell, Dr Ben Jones

What place for the UK in Europe's defence labyrinth?

16-03-2020

There is at least one point of agreement in the debates about the future relationship between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU): European security is British security. The UK's departure from the EU will not alter geography and the UK will inevitably share interests and challenges with its continental neighbours. The UK and the EU nations share the same strategic environment and, by default, the same threats to their peace and security. Historically, pragmatically and geographically ...

There is at least one point of agreement in the debates about the future relationship between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU): European security is British security. The UK's departure from the EU will not alter geography and the UK will inevitably share interests and challenges with its continental neighbours. The UK and the EU nations share the same strategic environment and, by default, the same threats to their peace and security. Historically, pragmatically and geographically, they remain deeply linked from a security and defence perspective, and there is general consensus on the need to nurture this link. This view is reflected in official documents from both sides. Having now left the Union, the UK has become a third country to the EU, albeit a distinctive one, and future cooperation will evolve on that basis. While the EU's common security and defence policy has an established precedent of close cooperation with third countries on missions and operations, the EU's new defence integration initiatives are currently tracing new contours for third-party cooperation. Possibilities for going beyond existing EU rules for third-country participation and more precise parameters for security and defence cooperation between the EU and the UK will likely be decided after the transition period ends. The UK played a foundational role in shaping the EU's security and defence policy. Though long sceptical of EU-level supranational military integration, the UK nevertheless remains deeply interconnected with the remaining EU Member States in this area. As one of Europe's biggest military powers, the UK brings a particularly valuable contribution to the field, from top-notch military strategists and innovative capabilities to a highly performing army with varied expeditionary know-how. While it will continue to bring this contribution through NATO and intergovernmental formats, the UK and the EU both have an interest in close alignment, strategically, politically and militarily. They had, indeed, both expressed a commitment to securing an unparalleled partnership in foreign, security and defence policy. Regardless of anticipated difficulties in negotiating the future relationship, the two parties' security interests are largely shared. As threats pay no heed to a country's memberships, and great power competition is showing no sign of abating, a strongly knitted UK-EU relationship is essential.

Military mobility: Infrastructure for the defence of Europe

25-02-2020

To 'unite and strengthen Europe' is one of the goals expressed by the newly elected President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen. Her predecessor, Jean-Claude Juncker, believed that only 'a strong and united Europe can protect our citizens against threats internal and external.' European infrastructure that enables connectivity and ensures a rapid response in case of a crisis is a prerequisite for these visions. Since 2017, awareness has been increasing about the obstacles preventing ...

To 'unite and strengthen Europe' is one of the goals expressed by the newly elected President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen. Her predecessor, Jean-Claude Juncker, believed that only 'a strong and united Europe can protect our citizens against threats internal and external.' European infrastructure that enables connectivity and ensures a rapid response in case of a crisis is a prerequisite for these visions. Since 2017, awareness has been increasing about the obstacles preventing armed forces from moving effectively and swiftly across borders in crisis conditions. The measures taken to correct this strategic vulnerability are known under the term military mobility. Existing regulatory, administrative, and infrastructure inconsistencies and impediments across the territory of the European Union (EU) significantly hamper military exercises and training. Military mobility aims to harmonise rules across EU Member States and to explore the potential of a civilian-military approach to infrastructure development. Through measures such as funding dual use transport infrastructure, and simplifying diplomatic clearances and customs rules, the European Commission aims to improve military mobility across as well as beyond the EU, in support of missions and operations under the Common Security and Defence Policy. The unique EU contribution is its ability to leverage existing policies in the civilian realm to create added value for the military. This goal can be achieved only if a whole-of-government approach is applied, which in turn requires close collaboration between different bodies at the EU level, between them and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and between them and various actors at the Member State level. So far, military mobility has enjoyed a high degree of commitment from all stakeholders, which has in turn ensured swift policy implementation. It is becoming increasingly clear that military mobility is an essential piece in the EU's ambition to become a stronger global actor.

Policy Departments' Monthly Highlights - February 2020

10-02-2020

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Future of European Security and Defence Policy [What Think Tanks are thinking]

17-01-2020

The EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) aims to ensure an appropriate role for the Union in peace-keeping operations, conflict prevention and in the strengthening of international security. It is an integral part of the EU's comprehensive approach towards crisis management, drawing on civilian and military assets. Now its importance is rising because of the increasingly uncertain strategic environment. For years, the EU has been considered as an economic powerhouse but militarily weak, ...

The EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) aims to ensure an appropriate role for the Union in peace-keeping operations, conflict prevention and in the strengthening of international security. It is an integral part of the EU's comprehensive approach towards crisis management, drawing on civilian and military assets. Now its importance is rising because of the increasingly uncertain strategic environment. For years, the EU has been considered as an economic powerhouse but militarily weak, and it is currently debating whether and how to enhance its defence capabilities, notably because of the growing complexity of transatlantic security relations. The new European Commission President, Ursula von der Leyen, is determined to expand the EU’s international role, calling her Commission ‘geopolitical’. This note offers links to recent commentaries, studies and reports from international think tanks on the state of the future of the EU’s foreign, security and defence policy.

Commitments made at the hearing of Margaritis SCHINAS, Vice-President-designate - Promoting the European Way of Life

22-11-2019

The Vice President-designate, Margaritis Schinas, appeared before the European Parliament on 03 October 2019 to answer questions from MEPs in the Committees on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, Culture and Education, Employment and Social Affairs. During the hearing, he made a number of commitments which are highlighted in this document. These commitments refer to his portfolio, as described in the mission letter sent to him by Ursula von der Leyen, President-elect of the European Commission ...

The Vice President-designate, Margaritis Schinas, appeared before the European Parliament on 03 October 2019 to answer questions from MEPs in the Committees on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, Culture and Education, Employment and Social Affairs. During the hearing, he made a number of commitments which are highlighted in this document. These commitments refer to his portfolio, as described in the mission letter sent to him by Ursula von der Leyen, President-elect of the European Commission, including: - Skills, education and integration; - Finding common ground on migration; and - Security Union.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Didier Reynders - Justice

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Politische Maßnahmen der EU im Interesse der Bürger: Sicherheit und Verteidigung

28-06-2019

Für die Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik sind in der Europäischen Union in erster Linie die Mitgliedstaaten zuständig. Parallel dazu ist im Vertrag von Lissabon eine gemeinsame Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik vorgesehen, die nach und nach zu einer Europäischen Verteidigungsunion führen könnte. In diese Richtung sind seit 2016 erhebliche Fortschritte erzielt und im Rahmen des Mandats der Kommission und des Europäischen Parlaments für den Zeitraum 2014 bis 2019 mehrere Initiativen im Bereich ...

Für die Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik sind in der Europäischen Union in erster Linie die Mitgliedstaaten zuständig. Parallel dazu ist im Vertrag von Lissabon eine gemeinsame Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik vorgesehen, die nach und nach zu einer Europäischen Verteidigungsunion führen könnte. In diese Richtung sind seit 2016 erhebliche Fortschritte erzielt und im Rahmen des Mandats der Kommission und des Europäischen Parlaments für den Zeitraum 2014 bis 2019 mehrere Initiativen im Bereich der Sicherheit und Verteidigung vorgeschlagen sowie eingeleitet worden. Der Gedanke, dass sich die Europäische Union mit dem Bereich Sicherheit und Verteidigung befassen sollte, findet bei den Unionsbürgern zunehmend Anklang. Die Krisen in der östlichen und südlichen Nachbarschaft der EU, wie etwa die Besetzung der Krim und die Konflikte im Nahen Osten, haben ein Klima der Unsicherheit geschaffen, angesichts dessen von der EU gefordert wird, sich stärker zu engagieren. Letztere hat nach dem Beschluss des Rates aus dem Jahr 2013 und insbesondere seit der Einführung der Globalen Strategie für die Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik der Europäischen Union im Jahr 2016 in erster Linie mittels einer vollständigen Umsetzung der Bestimmungen des Vertrags von Lissabon daran gearbeitet, diesen Bedürfnissen Rechnung zu tragen. In den letzten Jahren hat die EU begonnen, ehrgeizige Initiativen im Bereich der Sicherheit und Verteidigung umzusetzen, wie etwa die Ständige Strukturierte Zusammenarbeit (SSZ), den Europäischen Aktionsplan im Verteidigungsbereich, der u. a. einen neuen Verteidigungsfonds zur Finanzierung von Forschung und Entwicklung der militärischen Fähigkeiten der EU beinhaltet, eine engere und effizientere Zusammenarbeit mit der Nordatlantikvertrags-Organisation (NATO), einen Plan, um militärische Mobilität innerhalb der EU zu erleichtern, sowie eine Änderung der Finanzierung ihrer zivilen und militärischen Missionen und Operationen, um deren Wirksamkeit zu erhöhen. Diese neuen Initiativen schlagen sich in den entsprechenden Vorschlägen im neuen Mehrjährigen Finanzrahmen (2021–2027) und den begleitenden haushaltsexternen Instrumenten nieder. Angesichts dessen, dass weitere Initiativen im Bereich der europäischen Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik in der jüngsten Vergangenheit von den Staats- und Regierungschefs der EU befürwortet wurden, werden künftig wohl bedeutende Debatten über eine mögliche allmähliche Schaffung einer Europäischen Verteidigungsunion stattfinden. Dies ist die aktualisierte Fassung eines Briefings, das vor der Europawahl 2019 veröffentlicht wurde.

Frieden und Sicherheit 2019: Überblick über die Maßnahmen der EU und Aussichten für die Zukunft

03-06-2019

Dies ist der zweite EU-Ausblick zu Frieden und Sicherheit, der vom Wissenschaftlichen Dienst des Europäischen Parlaments (EPRS) ausgearbeitet wurde. Die Reihe ist dazu gedacht, den Beitrag zu untersuchen und zu erläutern, den die Europäische Union durch ihre verschiedenen außenpolitischen Maßnahmen auf internationaler Ebene zur Förderung von Frieden und Sicherheit leistet. Die Studie bietet einen Überblick über den Themenbereich und den gegenwärtigen Stand der Dinge. Zunächst werden das Konzept ...

Dies ist der zweite EU-Ausblick zu Frieden und Sicherheit, der vom Wissenschaftlichen Dienst des Europäischen Parlaments (EPRS) ausgearbeitet wurde. Die Reihe ist dazu gedacht, den Beitrag zu untersuchen und zu erläutern, den die Europäische Union durch ihre verschiedenen außenpolitischen Maßnahmen auf internationaler Ebene zur Förderung von Frieden und Sicherheit leistet. Die Studie bietet einen Überblick über den Themenbereich und den gegenwärtigen Stand der Dinge. Zunächst werden das Konzept des Friedens und das sich wandelnde geopolitische Umfeld in Augenschein genommen. Dann werden die zentrale Bedeutung der Förderung von Frieden und Sicherheit im Rahmen des auswärtigen Handelns der EU dargelegt und die praktische Verfolgung dieser Grundsätze in drei Hauptbereichen der EU-Politik analysiert: Entwicklung, Demokratieförderung, Sicherheit und Verteidigung sowie in dem Bereich der Desinformation und ausländischen Einflussnahme, dem immer größere Bedeutung zukommt. Die Studie schließt mit dem Ausblick auf die Zukunft. Im Mittelpunkt einer getrennt veröffentlichten Parallelstudie stehen die Bemühungen der EU um eine Konsolidierung des Friedens in Kolumbien. Die Studien wurden mit dem Ziel verfasst, sie auf dem Normandy World Peace Forum im Juni 2019 zu präsentieren.

European Defence Fund: Multiannual financial framework 2021-2027

15-05-2019

In June 2018, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal on a European Defence Fund, including a budget allocation of €13 billion in current prices for the 2021-2027 period. The proposal aims to streamline and simplify the current legislation by integrating the Preparatory Action on Defence Research (research window) and the European Defence Industrial Development Programme (as one part of the capability window) into a single fund. The main aims of the fund are to foster the competitiveness ...

In June 2018, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal on a European Defence Fund, including a budget allocation of €13 billion in current prices for the 2021-2027 period. The proposal aims to streamline and simplify the current legislation by integrating the Preparatory Action on Defence Research (research window) and the European Defence Industrial Development Programme (as one part of the capability window) into a single fund. The main aims of the fund are to foster the competitiveness and innovativeness of European defence and to contribute to the EU's strategic autonomy. In this regard, the fund would support collaborative industrial projects; co finance the costs of prototype development; encourage the participation of small and medium-sized enterprises; and promote projects in the framework of permanent structured cooperation. Synergies are expected with other EU initiatives in the field of cybersecurity, maritime transport, border management, Horizon Europe, the space programme and the European Peace Facility. In April 2019, after several trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement on the programme, covering the content, but not, among other things, budgetary issues. Parliament adopted its position at first reading in April. Further discussions on the outstanding issues can be expected once Council reaches agreement on the overall multiannual budget. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

04-03-2021
ICM International Women's Day 2021
Andere Veranstaltung -
FEMM
04-03-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Unpacking the latest Eurobarometer survey
Andere Veranstaltung -
EPRS
15-03-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with Vivien Schmidt: Legitimacy and power in the EU
Andere Veranstaltung -
EPRS

Partner