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Single European Sky 2+ package: Amended Commission proposal

12-07-2021

The Single European Sky (SES) initiative aims to make EU airspace less fragmented and to improve air traffic management in terms of safety, capacity, cost-efficiency and the environment. Its current regulatory framework is based on two legislative packages: SES I (adopted in 2004), which set the principal legal framework, and SES II (adopted in 2009), which aimed to tackle substantial air traffic growth, increase safety, and reduce costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment ...

The Single European Sky (SES) initiative aims to make EU airspace less fragmented and to improve air traffic management in terms of safety, capacity, cost-efficiency and the environment. Its current regulatory framework is based on two legislative packages: SES I (adopted in 2004), which set the principal legal framework, and SES II (adopted in 2009), which aimed to tackle substantial air traffic growth, increase safety, and reduce costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment. Nonetheless, European airspace remains fragmented, costly and inefficient. The European Commission presented a revision of the SES in 2013 (the SES 2+ package). While the Parliament adopted its first-reading position in March 2014, in December 2014 the Council agreed only a partial general approach, owing to disagreement between the UK and Spain over the application of the text to Gibraltar airport. With Brexit having removed this blockage, the Commission has amended its initial proposal. The Council and the Parliament have both adopted their positions on the revised proposal, and can thus start trilogue negotiations. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

New civil aviation safety rules

15-10-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules and the rules have been in force since 11 September 2018. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 620.199, 28 March 2018.

New civil aviation safety rules

28-03-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. The provisional agreement now needs to be confirmed by Parliament in plenary. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 595.877, 12 January 2017.

Luftverkehr: Sicherheit

01-07-2017

Mit gemeinsamen Vorschriften, die schrittweise auf die gesamte Luftverkehrskette erweitert wurden, wird für ein einheitliches und hohes Maß an Sicherheit[1] im Luftverkehrsbinnenmarkt gesorgt.

Mit gemeinsamen Vorschriften, die schrittweise auf die gesamte Luftverkehrskette erweitert wurden, wird für ein einheitliches und hohes Maß an Sicherheit[1] im Luftverkehrsbinnenmarkt gesorgt.

New civil aviation safety rules

12-01-2017

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European ...

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to replace the current Regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The new proposal would introduce risk- and performance-based rules, close some safety gaps and interlinks safety more closely with other domains such as security and the environment. It proposes to strengthen EASA's role and take several measures to use existing resources more efficiently (e.g. sharing aviation inspectors). It also introduces essential requirements for drones. In November 2016, the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism generally backed the updated rules, in particular the idea of regulating drones at EU level. The report constitutes Parliament’s position for negotiations with the Council, which adopted its general approach for the negotiations with the Parliament on 1 December 2016. This updates an earlier edition, of January 2016: PE 573.933. "A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html"

Research for TRAN Committee - Prospects for “Remote” En-Route Air Traffic Services

15-08-2016

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Externe Autor

Stephen Wainwright and Rosie Offord, Mark Scott (Steer Davies Gleave)

Aviation strategy — European Union Aviation Safety Agency: Initial Appraisal of a European Commission Impact Assessment

25-02-2016

The main strengths of the IA are its apparently solid information base, including the two supporting studies, as well as good presentation of stakeholder views and the results of the public consultation throughout. It is, however, unfortunate that the external supporting studies do not appear to be publicly available. The IA would have benefitted from a clearer and more complete presentation of the background information and problem definition, as well as more direct reference to the evidence identified ...

The main strengths of the IA are its apparently solid information base, including the two supporting studies, as well as good presentation of stakeholder views and the results of the public consultation throughout. It is, however, unfortunate that the external supporting studies do not appear to be publicly available. The IA would have benefitted from a clearer and more complete presentation of the background information and problem definition, as well as more direct reference to the evidence identified. There appears to be a certain bias towards the preferred options, as far as the way in which options are presented is concerned; the question remains as to whether additional options could have been considered in order to provide a broader choice of genuine alternatives. There are also some technical presentation issues, such as rather inconsistent numbering of the items in some sections. It is striking that no reference whatsoever appears to be made to the existence of a second, separate IA (on drones) which accompanies the same proposal and thus is presumably intended to complete the overall analysis.

New civil aviation safety rules

21-01-2016

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as drones, are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed ...

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as drones, are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to replace the current Regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The new proposal would introduce risk- and performance-based rules, close some safety gaps and interlinks safety more closely with other domains such as security and the environment. It proposes to strengthen EASA's role and take several measures to use existing resources more efficiently (e.g. sharing aviation inspectors). It also introduces essential requirements for drones. Initial reactions have generally welcomed the updated rules, in particular the stronger role for EASA and the idea of regulating drones at the EU level. However, some stakeholders disagree with the extension of the role of EASA in some domains or seek stronger requirements on drones. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Civil drones in the European Union

28-10-2015

Drones are aircraft which are operated with no pilot on board. Initially developed for military and defence purposes, they are increasingly used for various civil purposes, including photography, rescue operations, infrastructure monitoring, farming and aerial mapping. Being aircraft, drones have to comply with aviation safety rules. International civil aviation rules adopted since 1944 at United Nations level prohibit unmanned aircraft from flying over another state’s territory without its permission ...

Drones are aircraft which are operated with no pilot on board. Initially developed for military and defence purposes, they are increasingly used for various civil purposes, including photography, rescue operations, infrastructure monitoring, farming and aerial mapping. Being aircraft, drones have to comply with aviation safety rules. International civil aviation rules adopted since 1944 at United Nations level prohibit unmanned aircraft from flying over another state’s territory without its permission. In the EU, the current regulatory system for drones is based on fragmented rules, with many Member States having already regulated or planning to regulate some aspects of civil drones with an operating mass of 150 kg or less. The responsibility for civil drones over 150 kg is left to the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). However, the extent, content and level of detail of national regulations differs, and conditions for mutual recognition of operational authorisations between EU Member States have not been reached. In 2014, the Commission adopted a Communication outlining a strategy for opening the aviation market gradually to civil drones. In the strategy it calls for adoption of EU-wide rules on civil drones, which should ensure that drones are safe, secure and respect fundamental rights. The Council is in favour of a harmonised European approach, and considers EASA best placed to develop technical and safety standards, licences and certificates. The EP's Committee on Transport and Tourism presents its views in a report on civil drones to be voted by the EP plenary in October 2015. In its report, the Committee calls for proportionate and risk-based rules, while also putting emphasis on safety, privacy, security and data protection. The next step is the revision of EASA's Basic Regulation to include in it a specific article on drones, and define their essential requirements.

The European Aviation Safety Agency

17-07-2015

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is one of the EU's decentralised bodies. Based in Cologne, it has specific regulatory and executive tasks in the field of civil aviation safety and environmental protection. The Agency prepares draft rules, provides technical, scientific and administrative support, conducts standardisation inspections and investigations and certifies aviation products. The scope of its competences might be extended in the framework of the revision of its Basic Regulation ...

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is one of the EU's decentralised bodies. Based in Cologne, it has specific regulatory and executive tasks in the field of civil aviation safety and environmental protection. The Agency prepares draft rules, provides technical, scientific and administrative support, conducts standardisation inspections and investigations and certifies aviation products. The scope of its competences might be extended in the framework of the revision of its Basic Regulation, which the Commission has announced will form part of a wider package of proposals on aviation, anticipated for later this year.

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