948

Ergebnis(se)

Wort/Wörter
Art der Veröffentlichung
Verfasser
Schlagwortliste
Datum

Blockchain and the General Data Protection Regulation

24-07-2019

In recent times, there has been much discussion in policy circles, academia and the private sector regarding the tension between blockchains and the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (‘GDPR’). Whereas, the GDPR is based on an underlying assumption that in relation to each personal data point there is at least one the data controller, blockchains make the allocation of responsibility and accountability burdensome. Further, although the GDPR is based on the assumption that data can ...

In recent times, there has been much discussion in policy circles, academia and the private sector regarding the tension between blockchains and the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (‘GDPR’). Whereas, the GDPR is based on an underlying assumption that in relation to each personal data point there is at least one the data controller, blockchains make the allocation of responsibility and accountability burdensome. Further, although the GDPR is based on the assumption that data can be modified or erased where necessary to comply with legal requirements, blockchains, however, render the unilateral modification of data purposefully onerous in order to ensure data integrity and to increase trust in the network.

Externe Autor

This study was written by Dr Michèle Finck

Banking Union: Completing the Single Rule Book

18-07-2019

This briefing provides an insight into where banking legislation stands in terms of providing a ‘single rule book’ for the purposes of supervising banks in the Banking Union It also identifies the key areas where further harmonisation would facilitate both supervision and resolution.

This briefing provides an insight into where banking legislation stands in terms of providing a ‘single rule book’ for the purposes of supervising banks in the Banking Union It also identifies the key areas where further harmonisation would facilitate both supervision and resolution.

Public hearing with Elke König, Chair of the Single Resolution Board, on the SRB Annual Report 2018 - ECON on 22 July 2019

18-07-2019

This note is prepared in view of a public hearing with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB), Elke König who will inter alia present the SRB 2018 Annual Report.

This note is prepared in view of a public hearing with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB), Elke König who will inter alia present the SRB 2018 Annual Report.

Banking Union: What next?

18-07-2019

This briefing summarises the key areas of possible regulatory initiatives with a view to further completing the Banking Union: (1) EDIS, (2) Further harmonisation of banking law (“single rule book’), (3) Home/host issues, (4) Resolution financing, (5) Further harmonisation of insolvency law, (6) safe assets and regulatory treatment of sovereign exposures and (7) AML supervision. These issues are further explained in additional thematic briefings.

This briefing summarises the key areas of possible regulatory initiatives with a view to further completing the Banking Union: (1) EDIS, (2) Further harmonisation of banking law (“single rule book’), (3) Home/host issues, (4) Resolution financing, (5) Further harmonisation of insolvency law, (6) safe assets and regulatory treatment of sovereign exposures and (7) AML supervision. These issues are further explained in additional thematic briefings.

An Effective Regime for Non-viable Banks: US Experience and Considerations for EU Reform

17-07-2019

For 85 years, the US regime for non-viable banks has maintained a high degree of stability and public confidence by protecting deposits, while working to minimize the public cost of that protection. With awareness of the difference in context, EU reformers can draw valuable insights from the US experience. On balance, a review of the US regime supports arguments in favour of harmonization and centralization of bank insolvency proceedings and deposit insurance in Europe’s banking union. A unitary ...

For 85 years, the US regime for non-viable banks has maintained a high degree of stability and public confidence by protecting deposits, while working to minimize the public cost of that protection. With awareness of the difference in context, EU reformers can draw valuable insights from the US experience. On balance, a review of the US regime supports arguments in favour of harmonization and centralization of bank insolvency proceedings and deposit insurance in Europe’s banking union. A unitary regime would improve on the current EU status quo along multiple dimensions: deposit protection, creditor rights, controlling moral hazard, predictability and operational effectiveness, transparency and accountability, and financial stability. It would help break the bank-sovereign vicious circle in the euro area. The US experience suggests that substantial improvements are achievable in a well-designed system of institutional checks and balances that learns and adapts over time.

Externe Autor

A.Gelpern, N.Véron

Single Resolution Mechanism - Main Features, Oversight and Accountability

16-07-2019

One of the key lessons learned from the financial crisis in 2007-2008 is that in order to reduce the direct and indirect costs of bank failures for national governments, one has to have a credible framework in place to deal with banks’ failures, including clear rules as to the allocation of losses and the conditions attached to the use of common resources, to provide strong incentives for taking measures of precaution in good times and minimise losses in times of crisis. To that end, Europe has put ...

One of the key lessons learned from the financial crisis in 2007-2008 is that in order to reduce the direct and indirect costs of bank failures for national governments, one has to have a credible framework in place to deal with banks’ failures, including clear rules as to the allocation of losses and the conditions attached to the use of common resources, to provide strong incentives for taking measures of precaution in good times and minimise losses in times of crisis. To that end, Europe has put together a framework for resolving banks in difficulties. That framework is the Single Resolution Mechanism, headed by an European agency, the Single Resolution Board (SRB), based on Regulation 806/2014 and comprising all national resolution authorities of the Member States participating in the Banking Union.

Single Supervisory Mechanism – Main Features, Oversight and Accountability

16-07-2019

The Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM) is, along with the Single Resolution Mechanism, one of the pillars or the Banking Union (the third pillar, the common deposit guarantee scheme, still pending completion). It comprises the European Central Bank, in its supervisory capacity, and the national supervisory authorities (NCAs) of participating Member States.

The Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM) is, along with the Single Resolution Mechanism, one of the pillars or the Banking Union (the third pillar, the common deposit guarantee scheme, still pending completion). It comprises the European Central Bank, in its supervisory capacity, and the national supervisory authorities (NCAs) of participating Member States.

Banking Union: Towards new arrangements for the provision of liquidity in resolution?

16-07-2019

The recent case of Banco Popular has shown the importance of liquidity funding in the context of bank resolution. The Eurogroup report endorsed by the December 2018 Euro Summit noted the “broad support for the assessment of the institutions [i.e. ECB, SRB and Commission] that there are limitations in the current framework [for liquidity provision in resolution] which may hamper its effectiveness. The June 2019 Euro summit has not yet reached any conclusions on the design of that liquidity facility ...

The recent case of Banco Popular has shown the importance of liquidity funding in the context of bank resolution. The Eurogroup report endorsed by the December 2018 Euro Summit noted the “broad support for the assessment of the institutions [i.e. ECB, SRB and Commission] that there are limitations in the current framework [for liquidity provision in resolution] which may hamper its effectiveness. The June 2019 Euro summit has not yet reached any conclusions on the design of that liquidity facility, as planned. The Eurogroup is expected to report back to the Euro-Summit in December 2019. This briefing (1) describes the existing arrangements in the Banking Union, (2) compares those arrangements with the US and the UK regimes and (3) echoes ongoing reflections on possible new arrangements with a view to completing the Banking Union. This briefing is an updated version of a briefing initially drafted in July 2018.

Banking Union: Defusing the “home/host” debate

16-07-2019

While a banking group located in the Banking Union is supervised by a single supervisor (SSM) and no longer by home and host supervisors, subsidiaries are subject to individual requirements with remaining national powers over legal entities of a group. Further integration of banking groups’ risk management has been identified by the Chair of the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM) as one of the remaining steps to completing the Banking Union. For the Chair of the SSM, there are “still obstacles to ...

While a banking group located in the Banking Union is supervised by a single supervisor (SSM) and no longer by home and host supervisors, subsidiaries are subject to individual requirements with remaining national powers over legal entities of a group. Further integration of banking groups’ risk management has been identified by the Chair of the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM) as one of the remaining steps to completing the Banking Union. For the Chair of the SSM, there are “still obstacles to the integrated management of bank capital and liquidity within cross-border groups operating in the banking union”. As the SSM put it “the fences should be removed; they are out of place within a banking union where the concept of home and host supervisors has disappeared”.

Politische Maßnahmen der EU im Interesse der Bürger: Bekämpfung von Steuerbetrug

28-06-2019

Die Steuerpolitik und die Bekämpfung von Steuerbetrug sind in den letzten fünf Jahren infolge mehrerer aufgedeckter Steuerschlupflöcher und der damit zusammenhängenden Berichterstattung in den Medien zunehmend in den Blickpunkt geraten. Angesichts der Rezession und der daraus resultierenden Haushaltszwänge hat der Widerstand gegen schädigende Steuerpraktiken dadurch noch weiter zugenommen. Mit der Bekämpfung des Steuerbetrugs wird nun das Ziel verfolgt, nicht geleistete Zahlungen an die öffentliche ...

Die Steuerpolitik und die Bekämpfung von Steuerbetrug sind in den letzten fünf Jahren infolge mehrerer aufgedeckter Steuerschlupflöcher und der damit zusammenhängenden Berichterstattung in den Medien zunehmend in den Blickpunkt geraten. Angesichts der Rezession und der daraus resultierenden Haushaltszwänge hat der Widerstand gegen schädigende Steuerpraktiken dadurch noch weiter zugenommen. Mit der Bekämpfung des Steuerbetrugs wird nun das Ziel verfolgt, nicht geleistete Zahlungen an die öffentliche Hand beizutreiben. Ferner soll damit vermieden werden, dass Betrüger gegenüber ehrlichen Steuerzahlern Vorteile haben, also für gerechte Bedingungen für alle Steuerzahler gesorgt werden. Nicht gezahlte Steuern haben zur Folge, dass in den nationalen Haushalten und im Haushalt der Europäischen Union (EU) entsprechend weniger Mittel zur Verfügung stehen. Dabei ist der genaue Umfang nicht entrichteter Steuern naturgemäß schwierig zu ermitteln, Schätzungen zufolge ist jedoch von hohen Einnahmeausfällen für die öffentlichen Finanzen auszugehen. Die Bürgerinnen und Bürger bewerten die Mitwirkung der EU bei der Bekämpfung von Steuerbetrug besser als zuvor, jedoch erwartet die Mehrheit der Bürger in allen Mitgliedstaaten eine noch stärkere Mitwirkung. Allerdings besteht zwischen den Bewertungen und den Erwartungen der Bürger im Hinblick auf die Mitwirkung der EU weiterhin eine beträchtliche Lücke. Es besteht nach wie vor Potenzial, besser auf die Wünsche und Erwartungen der EU-Bürger einzugehen. Die Bekämpfung von Steuerbetrug liegt in der geteilten Zuständigkeit zwischen den Mitgliedstaaten und der EU. Als Teil der Steuerpolitik ist sie seit jeher eng an die Souveränität der Mitgliedstaaten gebunden, und da in diesem Bereich Einstimmigkeit und ein besonderes Gesetzgebungsverfahren vorgesehen sind, übt der Rat strenge Kontrolle über die Steuerangelegenheiten aus. Obwohl Vorschläge für begrenzte Änderungen des Steuerrahmens vorgelegt wurden, ist diese Situation seit den Anfängen der Union unverändert. Da die Defizite mittlerweile klarer identifiziert sind, hat der Präsident der Europäischen Kommission in den Reden zur Lage der Union vor dem Europäischen Parlament die Debatte erneut eröffnet. Zur Bekämpfung von Steuerbetrug gehören nicht nur Maßnahmen gegen illegales Verhalten, sondern auch Abschreckung und Maßnahmen zur Förderung der Steuerehrlichkeit. So ist eine weitreichende Überarbeitung der steuerlichen Vorschriften erforderlich, um sie auf den Umfang und die sich ständig weiterentwickelnden Praktiken des Steuerbetrugs abzustimmen. Doch bei allen Errungenschaften in der Wahlperiode 2014–2019 bleibt noch Arbeit zu tun, denn die Vorschriften müssen auch umgesetzt, durchgesetzt, überwacht und bei Bedarf aktualisiert werden, um mit der Vielseitigkeit von Steuerbetrugspraktiken sowie mit dem Tempo der weltweiten digitalen Entwicklung Schritt zu halten. Dies ist eine aktualisierte Fassung eines früheren Briefings, das vor der Wahl zum Europäischen Parlament 2019 herausgegeben wurde.

Partner

Bleiben Sie in Verbindung

email update imageAktuelle Informationen per E-Mail

Sie können sich per E-Mail aktuelle Mitteilungen über Personen und Ereignisse im Zusammenhang mit dem Europäischen Parlament zusenden lassen. Dazu zählen aktuelle Informationen der Mitglieder, der Informationsdienststellen oder des Think Tank.

Dieser Dienst kann auf der gesamten Website des Europäischen Parlaments genutzt werden. Sie können den Dienst abonnieren und Mitteilungen des Think Tank erhalten, indem Sie einfach Ihre E-Mail-Adresse angeben, ein Thema auswählen, zu dem Sie Informationen erhalten möchten, die Häufigkeit der Mitteilungen (täglich, wöchentlich oder monatlich) festlegen und abschließend zur Bestätigung auf den Link klicken, der Ihnen zu diesem Zweck per E-Mail geschickt wird.

RSS imageRSS-Feeds

Über den RSS-Feed bleiben Sie immer auf dem Laufenden und werden über alle Aktualisierungen auf der Website des Europäischen Parlaments informiert.

Klicken Sie auf den folgenden Link, um den RSS-Feed zu konfigurieren.