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Mexico's Parliament and other political institutions

21-01-2021

The United Mexican States is the third-largest country in Latin America, with the second-largest economy and population. It is a federal republic, composed of 31 states plus Mexico City. The country is an electoral democracy with universal suffrage, a presidential system of government and separation of powers. The executive power is vested in the President of the Republic, the legislative power in the bicameral Congress of the Union and the judicial power in the Federal Courts of Justice. States ...

The United Mexican States is the third-largest country in Latin America, with the second-largest economy and population. It is a federal republic, composed of 31 states plus Mexico City. The country is an electoral democracy with universal suffrage, a presidential system of government and separation of powers. The executive power is vested in the President of the Republic, the legislative power in the bicameral Congress of the Union and the judicial power in the Federal Courts of Justice. States are headed by a governor and have unicameral legislatures. Mexico has always had a multilateral vocation, maintaining a wide presence in global and regional organisations. It has close historical and cultural ties with the EU, with which it shares fundamental values. Mexico was the first Latin American country to sign an economic partnership, political coordination and cooperation agreement (a 'Global Agreement', which has just been modernised) with the EU, and is – alongside Brazil – a strategic partner to the EU in the region. Relations between the European Parliament and the Mexican Congress of the Union are mainly maintained through the EU-Mexico Joint Parliamentary Committee (JPC), made up of delegations from both sides. The European Parliament and the Congress of the Union also work together at the bi-regional level in the framework of the Euro-Latin America Parliamentary Assembly (EuroLat).

After the storming of the US Capitol: A second impeachment trial of President Trump?

20-01-2021

At 13.00 EST on 6 January 2021, the 117th United States Congress and US Vice-President Mike Pence assembled in the Capitol Building, seat of the US Congress in Washington, DC, to tally the electoral votes certified by the 50 states and the District of Columbia, thereby declaring Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, respectively, US President-elect and Vice-President-elect. The ceremony was interrupted when an angry mob, seemingly encouraged by President Donald Trump in a speech earlier that day, broke into ...

At 13.00 EST on 6 January 2021, the 117th United States Congress and US Vice-President Mike Pence assembled in the Capitol Building, seat of the US Congress in Washington, DC, to tally the electoral votes certified by the 50 states and the District of Columbia, thereby declaring Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, respectively, US President-elect and Vice-President-elect. The ceremony was interrupted when an angry mob, seemingly encouraged by President Donald Trump in a speech earlier that day, broke into the Capitol and forced the Vice-President and Members of Congress to shelter in fear for their lives, while the intruders clashed with Capitol security and vandalised and stole property. Later that day, the combined forces of the police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Guard were able to evict the protesters and secure the building, allowing the Vice-President and Congress to re assemble and complete the ceremony. The invasion of the Capitol, a symbol of US democracy, has had dramatic political consequences. Trump has now been impeached by the House of Representatives for the second time − the only US President in history to be so. Democratic Party leaders had already appealed, the day after the intrusion, to Vice President Pence to use the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the US Constitution to replace Trump against his will before the end of his term on 20 January. The US Senate appears set to conduct an impeachment trial after Trump leaves office, but it is not certain that it has the authority to do so, or what the trial's legal or political outcome will be. This Briefing considers some of the options that Congress had to deprive President Trump of power immediately after 6 January, and the options that remain after Joe Biden becomes President on 20 January 2021.

Brexit: The EU-UK trade deal [What Think Tanks are thinking]

19-01-2021

The European Union and the United Kingdom reached a last-minute deal on trade and other issues on 24 December 2020, thereby avoiding major disruption from 1 January 2021, the date on which the transition period ended. However, many politicians and experts have noted that the agreement does not cover all areas of potential partnership, as well as leaving some issues ambiguous, so there is much potential for complex further negotiations in the future. In practice, the EU-UK trading relationship has ...

The European Union and the United Kingdom reached a last-minute deal on trade and other issues on 24 December 2020, thereby avoiding major disruption from 1 January 2021, the date on which the transition period ended. However, many politicians and experts have noted that the agreement does not cover all areas of potential partnership, as well as leaving some issues ambiguous, so there is much potential for complex further negotiations in the future. In practice, the EU-UK trading relationship has been further complicated, at least in the short term, by the effects of the coronavirus crisis and a recent upsurge in infections in the United Kingdom. This note offers links to recent commentaries, studies and reports from international think tanks on Brexit and related issues. More studies on the topic can be found in a previous item from this series, published in September 2020.

Qualified majority voting in foreign and security policy: Pros and Cons

19-01-2021

In her first State of the Union speech, and in the section of the speech most applauded by the European Parliament, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen called for the use of qualified majority voting (QMV) in areas such as sanctions and human rights. The crises and security challenges accumulating in and around the European Union have added to the urgency of having a more effective and rapid decision-making process in areas pertaining to the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP ...

In her first State of the Union speech, and in the section of the speech most applauded by the European Parliament, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen called for the use of qualified majority voting (QMV) in areas such as sanctions and human rights. The crises and security challenges accumulating in and around the European Union have added to the urgency of having a more effective and rapid decision-making process in areas pertaining to the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). The core encumbrance against unanimous EU agreement on foreign policy is argued to be the absence of a common strategic culture among EU Member States. The Lisbon Treaty's architects have equipped the EU Treaties with 'passerelle clauses' – provisions usually aimed at modifying the decision-making of the Council of the EU. The passerelle clause for CFSP is Article 31(3) of the Treaty on European Union, which empowers the European Council to, by unanimous agreement, allow the Council of the EU to take decisions by QMV in some areas of the CFSP. Another option is an emergency brake – cancelling a vote for vital reasons of national policy – while constructive abstention is an option which allows a Member State to abstain from a unanimous vote without blocking it. Since 2016, the EU has witnessed growing momentum to shape its identity as a security provider and peace promoter. From 2020 and until 2022, it is undertaking a strategic reflection process taking the form of a 'strategic compass', whereby the threats, challenges and objectives for the Union in security and defence will be better defined. It is in this context that the debate about QMV in foreign and security policy has resurfaced and continues to be the subject of policy discussions. Nevertheless, recent efforts to innovate in the EU’s methods for adopting sanctions in the field of human rights abuses (the European Magnitsky Act) have been unsuccessful in their attempt to move from unanimity to qualified majority voting.

Umsetzung der Gemeinsamen Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik

13-01-2021

Das wichtigste Mittel, mit dem die Europäische Union (EU) zur Stärkung des Weltfriedens und der internationalen Sicherheit beiträgt, ist ihre Gemeinsame Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik (GSVP). Diese Politik ist im Vertrag von Lissabon verankert und bildet den wichtigsten Rahmen für gemeinsame Maßnahmen der EU-Mitgliedstaaten in Sicherheits- und Verteidigungsfragen. Auf seiner Plenartagung im Januar 2021 soll das Europäische Parlament über den jährlichen GSVP-Bericht für 2020 abstimmen.

Das wichtigste Mittel, mit dem die Europäische Union (EU) zur Stärkung des Weltfriedens und der internationalen Sicherheit beiträgt, ist ihre Gemeinsame Sicherheits- und Verteidigungspolitik (GSVP). Diese Politik ist im Vertrag von Lissabon verankert und bildet den wichtigsten Rahmen für gemeinsame Maßnahmen der EU-Mitgliedstaaten in Sicherheits- und Verteidigungsfragen. Auf seiner Plenartagung im Januar 2021 soll das Europäische Parlament über den jährlichen GSVP-Bericht für 2020 abstimmen.

Menschenrechte und Demokratie in der Welt

13-01-2021

Im Rahmen der Plenartagung im Januar 2021 soll das Europäische Parlament den EU-Jahresbericht über Menschenrechte und Demokratie in der Welt erörtern. Im jüngsten Jahresbericht, der im Juni 2020 vom Rat angenommen wurde, wird die führende Rolle der EU bei der Förderung der Menschenrechte und der Demokratie im Jahr 2019 vor dem Hintergrund negativer Entwicklungen weltweit hervorgehoben. Der Bericht des Ausschusses für auswärtige Angelegenheiten des Europäischen Parlaments trägt jüngeren Entwicklungen ...

Im Rahmen der Plenartagung im Januar 2021 soll das Europäische Parlament den EU-Jahresbericht über Menschenrechte und Demokratie in der Welt erörtern. Im jüngsten Jahresbericht, der im Juni 2020 vom Rat angenommen wurde, wird die führende Rolle der EU bei der Förderung der Menschenrechte und der Demokratie im Jahr 2019 vor dem Hintergrund negativer Entwicklungen weltweit hervorgehoben. Der Bericht des Ausschusses für auswärtige Angelegenheiten des Europäischen Parlaments trägt jüngeren Entwicklungen wie den Auswirkungen des Coronavirus Rechnung. In dem Bericht wird darauf hingewiesen, dass die Reaktion auf die Pandemie einen Rückgang der Einhaltung der demokratischen und menschenrechtlichen Normen in einigen Ländern zur Folge hatte. Das Parlament soll auf der Grundlage dieses Berichts Empfehlungen für künftige Maßnahmen der EU zur Förderung der Menschenrechte und der Demokratie abgeben.

Umsetzung der Gemeinsamen Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik (GASP)

13-01-2021

Durch die Gemeinsame Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik (GASP) will die Europäische Union (EU) Beziehungen zu Drittstaaten und internationalen, regionalen oder globalen Organisationen mit gemeinsamen Grundsätzen zu Menschenrechten, Demokratie und Grundfreiheiten knüpfen und entsprechende Partnerschaften schaffen. Die GASP fördert multilaterale Lösungen für gemeinsame Probleme auf der Grundlage des Völkerrechts und internationaler Werte. Bei seiner Plenartagung im Januar 2021 soll das Europäische Parlament ...

Durch die Gemeinsame Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik (GASP) will die Europäische Union (EU) Beziehungen zu Drittstaaten und internationalen, regionalen oder globalen Organisationen mit gemeinsamen Grundsätzen zu Menschenrechten, Demokratie und Grundfreiheiten knüpfen und entsprechende Partnerschaften schaffen. Die GASP fördert multilaterale Lösungen für gemeinsame Probleme auf der Grundlage des Völkerrechts und internationaler Werte. Bei seiner Plenartagung im Januar 2021 soll das Europäische Parlament über den jährlichen GASP-Bericht für 2020 abstimmen.

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - January 2020

13-01-2021

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Social media communication by the Heads of State or Government in the European Council: a comprehensive analysis of EU Leaders’ discourse on Europe via Twitter

07-01-2021

Over recent years, the members of the European Council have, in a number of landmark declarations such as the Bratislava Declaration, pointed to the need to improve communication with citizens, as part of the process of building greater trust and confidence in the European Union and its institutions. As social media, and notably Twitter, have become an important part of politicians' communication strategy generally, this study looks specifically at how EU leaders in the European Council communicate ...

Over recent years, the members of the European Council have, in a number of landmark declarations such as the Bratislava Declaration, pointed to the need to improve communication with citizens, as part of the process of building greater trust and confidence in the European Union and its institutions. As social media, and notably Twitter, have become an important part of politicians' communication strategy generally, this study looks specifically at how EU leaders in the European Council communicate on Europe via Twitter. This EPRS study explores provides an overview of the activity on Twitter of all members of the European Council over an 18-month period – in just over 31 000 tweets posted between January 2019 and June 2020 – covering a very wide range of issues. The study identifies the European topics that EU-27 leaders tweet about – their own interactions, external relations and the EU budget – and it explores the ways in which they communicate and engage with their target audiences, as well as pointing to differences of approach between them. EU-related tweets represent on average about a fifth of all EU leaders' tweets, with a greater emphasis on meetings as such than on substantive policy issues.

Ten issues to watch in 2021

06-01-2021

This is the fifth edition of an annual EPRS publication aimed at identifying and framing some of the key issues and policy areas that are likely to feature prominently on the political agenda of the European Union over the coming year. The topics analysed are: the Covid-19 race for a vaccine; the recovery plan; access to food; inequality; challenges for culture and the performing arts; a digital boost for the circular economy; critical raw materials; border controls; Turkey and the eastern Mediterranean ...

This is the fifth edition of an annual EPRS publication aimed at identifying and framing some of the key issues and policy areas that are likely to feature prominently on the political agenda of the European Union over the coming year. The topics analysed are: the Covid-19 race for a vaccine; the recovery plan; access to food; inequality; challenges for culture and the performing arts; a digital boost for the circular economy; critical raw materials; border controls; Turkey and the eastern Mediterranean; and the new US administration.

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

25-01-2021
Public Hearing on "Gender aspects of precarious work"
Anhörung -
FEMM
26-01-2021
Public hearing on Co-management of EU fisheries at local level
Anhörung -
PECH
26-01-2021
The impact of Brexit on the level playing field in the area of taxation
Anhörung -
FISC

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