Proceedings of the Workshop on "European Energy Community Strategy: Political, Economic and Environmental Challenges in South East Europe"

12-04-2013

While a sustainable energy strategy is needed in South East Europe, such a strategy should pay attention to the specific context of the region (i.e. post-conflict era, recent market liberalisation and corruption). The EU and South-East Europe countries share similar interests (i.e. energy security), yet their perception is to some extent different. For the South East Europe region, national energy security is a priority. EU conditionality (which translates into copy-pasting EU directives) is seen as not very efficient. Key challenges in EU-South East Europe cooperation also include the implementation of approximated legislation at a national level and the prioritisation based on regional criteria. The Energy Community Treaty could be used as a means to change the entire energy sector in the region; however this requires serious supporting policies. In particular, a strong rule of law approach (e.g. flanking measures in respect of antitrust and public procurement) is necessary to develop investments and build new infrastructures in the region.

While a sustainable energy strategy is needed in South East Europe, such a strategy should pay attention to the specific context of the region (i.e. post-conflict era, recent market liberalisation and corruption). The EU and South-East Europe countries share similar interests (i.e. energy security), yet their perception is to some extent different. For the South East Europe region, national energy security is a priority. EU conditionality (which translates into copy-pasting EU directives) is seen as not very efficient. Key challenges in EU-South East Europe cooperation also include the implementation of approximated legislation at a national level and the prioritisation based on regional criteria. The Energy Community Treaty could be used as a means to change the entire energy sector in the region; however this requires serious supporting policies. In particular, a strong rule of law approach (e.g. flanking measures in respect of antitrust and public procurement) is necessary to develop investments and build new infrastructures in the region.

Εξωτερικός συντάκτης

Alan RILEY (City Law School, City University, London) and Ana-Maria BOROMISA (Institute for Development and International Relations, Department for International Economic and Political Relations, Croatia)