The EU's 2020 budget: Response to the coronavirus pandemic

16-04-2020

Acting within the limits of its powers, the European Union (EU) responded immediately at the start of the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak to help repatriate people, coordinate measures to limit the spread of the virus, distribute medical equipment and promote the necessary research. The European Commission has put forward a range of measures, adjusted some of its policies and mobilised EU funds to assist EU citizens and mitigate the socio-economic impact of the pandemic. Financial support is also proposed for third countries. At the time of writing, a package of €40.4 billion to support healthcare systems and lessen the economic impact of the pandemic in Member States and third counties is proposed under the EU budget. This includes funds redirected within programmes and additional budgetary support. An initial aid package of €232 million was followed by a proposal to mobilise a further €128.6 million for civil protection in the EU and abroad. The Coronavirus Response Investment Initiative has opened up €8 billion in liquidity for Member States, supplemented by €29 billion in EU structural funding, to be redirected to healthcare investments to fight the coronavirus, and to provide support for the labour market and business, particularly SMEs, in all affected sectors. The emergency support instrument and the Union's civil protection mechanism will provide further €3 billion in order to meet the needs of European health systems in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, making extensive use of the flexibilities embedded in the EU budget. A further contribution from the EU budget will be included in the EU's global response for partner countries, which will provide financial support of more than €15.6 billion to help them deal with the impact of the coronavirus. From the start of the crisis, the European Parliament has been calling for bold and ambitious financial aid and for an ambitious future budget to make the EU stronger. Now is the time to mobilise funds and think ahead how best to shape a strong long-term budget for the EU.

Acting within the limits of its powers, the European Union (EU) responded immediately at the start of the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak to help repatriate people, coordinate measures to limit the spread of the virus, distribute medical equipment and promote the necessary research. The European Commission has put forward a range of measures, adjusted some of its policies and mobilised EU funds to assist EU citizens and mitigate the socio-economic impact of the pandemic. Financial support is also proposed for third countries. At the time of writing, a package of €40.4 billion to support healthcare systems and lessen the economic impact of the pandemic in Member States and third counties is proposed under the EU budget. This includes funds redirected within programmes and additional budgetary support. An initial aid package of €232 million was followed by a proposal to mobilise a further €128.6 million for civil protection in the EU and abroad. The Coronavirus Response Investment Initiative has opened up €8 billion in liquidity for Member States, supplemented by €29 billion in EU structural funding, to be redirected to healthcare investments to fight the coronavirus, and to provide support for the labour market and business, particularly SMEs, in all affected sectors. The emergency support instrument and the Union's civil protection mechanism will provide further €3 billion in order to meet the needs of European health systems in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, making extensive use of the flexibilities embedded in the EU budget. A further contribution from the EU budget will be included in the EU's global response for partner countries, which will provide financial support of more than €15.6 billion to help them deal with the impact of the coronavirus. From the start of the crisis, the European Parliament has been calling for bold and ambitious financial aid and for an ambitious future budget to make the EU stronger. Now is the time to mobilise funds and think ahead how best to shape a strong long-term budget for the EU.