The Slovenian Parliament and EU affairs

01-07-2021

Since 1991 the Republic of Slovenia has had a parliamentary system composed of the Državni zbor (National Assembly) and the Državni svet (National Council). The Slovenian Parliament has the features of an 'incomplete bicameral system', based on 'asymmetric duality' – the National Council has less authority and fewer competences than the National Assembly, in accordance with Chapter IV of the Constitution. The National Assembly is described as the 'supreme representative and legislative institution, exercising legislative and electoral powers as well as control over the Executive'. Its members are elected every four years from nine constituencies by a universal, equal, direct, and secret vote. Different, specific, rules apply to the election of one member each of the Italian and Hungarian national communities. The Government of Slovenia is accountable to the National Assembly, and the Prime Minister is elected by the National Assembly by a majority vote of all of its members. This briefing is part of an EPRS series on national parliaments (NPs) and EU affairs. It aims to provide an overview of the way the NPs of EU Member States are structured and how they process, scrutinise and engage with EU legislation. It also provides information on relevant NP publications.

Since 1991 the Republic of Slovenia has had a parliamentary system composed of the Državni zbor (National Assembly) and the Državni svet (National Council). The Slovenian Parliament has the features of an 'incomplete bicameral system', based on 'asymmetric duality' – the National Council has less authority and fewer competences than the National Assembly, in accordance with Chapter IV of the Constitution. The National Assembly is described as the 'supreme representative and legislative institution, exercising legislative and electoral powers as well as control over the Executive'. Its members are elected every four years from nine constituencies by a universal, equal, direct, and secret vote. Different, specific, rules apply to the election of one member each of the Italian and Hungarian national communities. The Government of Slovenia is accountable to the National Assembly, and the Prime Minister is elected by the National Assembly by a majority vote of all of its members. This briefing is part of an EPRS series on national parliaments (NPs) and EU affairs. It aims to provide an overview of the way the NPs of EU Member States are structured and how they process, scrutinise and engage with EU legislation. It also provides information on relevant NP publications.