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Posted on 28-09-2021

Research for TRAN Committee - Alternative fuels infrastructure for heavy-duty vehicles

28-09-2021

This briefing presents the opportunities and challenges for use and deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the EU for heavy-duty vehicles, in particular for trucks. Details on the current state of play and future needs are presented in the context of the ambitions of the Green Deal and current legislative developments, in particular the upcoming reviews of the Alternative Fuels Directive and TEN-T regulation.

This briefing presents the opportunities and challenges for use and deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the EU for heavy-duty vehicles, in particular for trucks. Details on the current state of play and future needs are presented in the context of the ambitions of the Green Deal and current legislative developments, in particular the upcoming reviews of the Alternative Fuels Directive and TEN-T regulation.

External author

External authors of the study:CE Delft: Anouk VAN GRINSVEN, Matthijs OTTEN, Emiel VAN DEN TOORN, Reinier VAN DER VEEN, Julius KIRÁLY, Roy VAN DEN BERG

Understanding the EU's response to illicit drugs

28-09-2021

The EU is an important market for illicit drugs, both in terms of consumption and production. An estimated 28.9 % of European adults aged 15-65 have used illicit drugs at least once in their lifetime, a majority of them being men. Cannabis remains by far the most used drug, followed by cocaine, MDMA (ecstasy or molly) and amphetamines. Illicit drugs have been claiming an increasing number of lives in the EU since 2012, but their impact goes far beyond the harm caused by their use. The illicit drugs ...

The EU is an important market for illicit drugs, both in terms of consumption and production. An estimated 28.9 % of European adults aged 15-65 have used illicit drugs at least once in their lifetime, a majority of them being men. Cannabis remains by far the most used drug, followed by cocaine, MDMA (ecstasy or molly) and amphetamines. Illicit drugs have been claiming an increasing number of lives in the EU since 2012, but their impact goes far beyond the harm caused by their use. The illicit drugs market is the largest criminal market in the EU, with an estimated minimum retail value of €30 billion per year in the EU alone. Over a third of the organised crime groups active in the EU are involved in the trade in illicit drugs, which, besides generating massive criminal profits and inflicting substantial harm, incites associated violence. Drug markets furthermore have links with wider criminal activity, including terrorism; they have a negative impact on the legal economy and communities, cause environmental damage and can fuel corruption and undermine governance. Illicit drugs have been trafficked into and through the EU for decades, but they are also produced in the EU, for both local and global markets, as is the case of cannabis and synthetic drugs such as amphetamines. In fact, the trade in synthetic drugs in the EU is unique compared to other substances as the production of these drugs and new psychoactive substances in most cases takes place in the EU. In 2019, around 1.1 million seizures of illicit drugs were reported in the EU-27 plus Norway, Turkey and the UK. The European drug market has been remarkably resilient to disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Although the EU Member States carry the primary responsibility for developing their drug policy and legislation, cross-border cooperation is paramount in the fight against illicit drugs. With the problem constantly expanding in scale and complexity, the EU has been increasingly active since the early 1990s, in particular with respect to law enforcement, health-related issues and the detection and risk assessment of new psychoactive substances.

Posted on 27-09-2021

What if the Internet failed?

27-09-2021

What if the Internet failed? Since its early development in the 1960s, Internet infrastructure has become almost as important as electricity and transport infrastructures in contemporary societies. More and more key services such as banking, food retail, and health care, rely on Internet connections. Despite its original resilient decentralised design, the increasing importance of a few central players and centralising developments have made the Internet more vulnerable to failure. This would have ...

What if the Internet failed? Since its early development in the 1960s, Internet infrastructure has become almost as important as electricity and transport infrastructures in contemporary societies. More and more key services such as banking, food retail, and health care, rely on Internet connections. Despite its original resilient decentralised design, the increasing importance of a few central players and centralising developments have made the Internet more vulnerable to failure. This would have severe repercussions: citizens would no longer be able to withdraw cash or pay by card, supermarkets and large retailers could no longer bill and sell products, and digital certificates (such as the Covid-19 vaccination certificate) could no longer be controlled.

Research for TRAN - Committee: Relaunching transport and tourism in the EU after COVID-19 - Part III: Aviation sector

27-09-2021

This thematic briefing provides the European Parliament’s Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) with an overview of the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic on the aviation sector, as well as policy recommendations to address the challenges emerging from the crisis.

This thematic briefing provides the European Parliament’s Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) with an overview of the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic on the aviation sector, as well as policy recommendations to address the challenges emerging from the crisis.

External author

ORIGINAL STUDY PANTEIA: Maria RODRIGUES, Emilia SANDRI, Ljubica KNEZEVIC, Tharsis TEOH Università degli Studi Roma Tre: Barbara ANTONUCCi, Nicole CUTRUFO, Lidia MARONGIU

EU-US Trade and Technology Council: New forum for transatlantic cooperation

27-09-2021

In December 2020, the European Commission proposed the creation of the EU-US Trade and Technology Council (TTC), to facilitate trade, expand investment, develop compatible standards, boost innovation and strengthen the partners' technological and industrial leadership. The TTC also aims to 'lead values-based digital transformation'. Meanwhile, trade between the EU and US continues and is as important as ever, manifested in the fact that, together, they form the largest bilateral economic relationship ...

In December 2020, the European Commission proposed the creation of the EU-US Trade and Technology Council (TTC), to facilitate trade, expand investment, develop compatible standards, boost innovation and strengthen the partners' technological and industrial leadership. The TTC also aims to 'lead values-based digital transformation'. Meanwhile, trade between the EU and US continues and is as important as ever, manifested in the fact that, together, they form the largest bilateral economic relationship in the world, with the largest global data flows across the Atlantic. However, in recent years, transatlantic trade and technology policy relations have been marked by low levels of cooperation and a number of sources of tension. The 2021 change of administration in Washington nevertheless reinvigorated the relationship between the two. The TTC was formally launched during the EU-US Summit on 15 June 2021. High-level politicians will guide the Council, while the groundwork will be carried out in ten working groups, comprised of experts from both partners. They will cover issues such as common standards, resilient supply chains, tech regulation, global trade challenges, climate and green tech as well as investment screening and export controls. The establishment of the TTC has been widely welcomed by stakeholders and the think-tank community as an important step towards bridging existing gaps and moving on with a forward-looking agenda, focused on strategic areas and new ways of cooperation. While there is a genuine will to work together on common challenges, some difficult issues such as unresolved issues from the past and different approaches to regulating digital markets persist, and it remains to be seen whether the TTC will lead to the creation of an ambitious joint policy that influences trade and technology worldwide. The first meeting is due to take place on 29 September 2021 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Posted on 24-09-2021

European Day of Languages : Multilingualism as a cornerstone of better communication

24-09-2021

Some 7 000 languages are spoken globally today. However, half of the world's population shares just six native languages, and some 90 % of all languages could be replaced by dominant ones by the end of the century. Following the success of the European Year of Languages (2001), the Council of Europe designated 26 September as the European Day of Languages.

Some 7 000 languages are spoken globally today. However, half of the world's population shares just six native languages, and some 90 % of all languages could be replaced by dominant ones by the end of the century. Following the success of the European Year of Languages (2001), the Council of Europe designated 26 September as the European Day of Languages.

The role of non-financial performance indicators and integrated reporting in achieving sustainable value creation

24-09-2021

The original full study is a structured analysis of the current scientific evidence on the effects of sustainability reporting including non-financial performance indicators, stand-alone sustainability reporting as well as integrated reporting. It discusses the benefits and challenges particularly related to internal decision-making, external transparency as well as financial and non-financial/environmental, social and governance effects. Further, it offers policy recommendations in view of the ...

The original full study is a structured analysis of the current scientific evidence on the effects of sustainability reporting including non-financial performance indicators, stand-alone sustainability reporting as well as integrated reporting. It discusses the benefits and challenges particularly related to internal decision-making, external transparency as well as financial and non-financial/environmental, social and governance effects. Further, it offers policy recommendations in view of the European Commission’s proposal on the Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive.

External author

DINH, T., HUSMANN, A. and MELLONI G.,

Youth in Europe: Effects of Covid-19 on their economic and social situation

24-09-2021

The aim of this study is to provide the Members of the committee on Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) with an analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on young people, providing updated information on their economic and social situation, with a focus on employment.

The aim of this study is to provide the Members of the committee on Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) with an analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on young people, providing updated information on their economic and social situation, with a focus on employment.

Posted on 23-09-2021

European Regional Development Fund and Cohesion Fund 2021-2027

23-09-2021

In the context of the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF) on 29 May 2018. The new single regulation on the ERDF and CF (previously covered by two separate regulations) identifies the specific objectives and scope of support for both funds, including non-eligible activities. The majority of ERDF funding will focus on smart growth and the green economy ...

In the context of the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF) on 29 May 2018. The new single regulation on the ERDF and CF (previously covered by two separate regulations) identifies the specific objectives and scope of support for both funds, including non-eligible activities. The majority of ERDF funding will focus on smart growth and the green economy, while the fund will also support other activities such as connectivity, social issues and local development. The CF will continue to focus predominantly on environmental and transport infrastructure. Special provisions were proposed for territories such as urban areas and outermost regions. The indicator framework for monitoring progress will include new common results indicators. On 28 May 2020, the Commission amended the proposal to better support recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. A final political trilogue meeting took place on 9 February 2021, sealing agreement between the Council and the European Parliament. The Parliament voted on the draft regulation at its June II plenary session. The final act was signed 24 June and published in the Official Journal on 30 June 2021. Fifth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Maritime, Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund

23-09-2021

As part of the budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Union has adopted new rules on funding dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. Based on a Commission proposal of June 2018, Parliament adopted its first reading position in April 2019. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. Compared to the previous period, the new fund gives Member States more flexibility ...

As part of the budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Union has adopted new rules on funding dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. Based on a Commission proposal of June 2018, Parliament adopted its first reading position in April 2019. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. Compared to the previous period, the new fund gives Member States more flexibility in defining their own measures, as long as they support the priorities and are not part of a list of ineligible measures. Departing from the Commission proposal, the co legislators have extended support for the small-scale fleet to vessels between 12 and 24 metres in length. The fleet aid provisions allow support for the first acquisition of a vessel by a young fisherman, for the modernisation of engines, and for operations that improve safety, working conditions or energy efficiency. A greater focus on aquaculture is reflected in its inclusion in the name of the fund. Preferential aid is provided for outermost regions. At least 15 % of Member States' allocations should be spent on control and data collection. Following its adoption by the Council, Parliament adopted the agreed text in plenary on 6 July 2021, closing the procedure at second reading. The new regulation entered into force on 14 July and applies retroactively from January 2021. Sixth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure

Upcoming events

29-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: How will Artificial Intelligence change humanity?
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EPRS
30-09-2021
AIDA public hearing on AI and the data strategy
Hearing -
AIDA
30-09-2021
The risks and benefits of technology in the tax area
Workshop -
FISC

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