Search

Your results

Showing 10 of 64 results

Even – or especially – in complex, emergency situations, a gender perspective is vital in order to take into account the specific needs of women and men and the different risks to which they are exposed. Humanitarian actors are calling for a gender-sensitive response to the Ukraine crisis, to help tackle barriers to accessing vital services, address increased risks of gender-based violence and facilitate the reception and integration of refugees.

This year's International Women's Day will, once again, be held in the shadow of the coronavirus pandemic, which has exposed and exacerbated existing gender inequalities. To mark the occasion, Parliament's Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality (FEMM) is hosting a meeting with national parliaments on 3 March 2022, to explore the potential of gender-sensitive recovery policies, spotlighting inter-related issues around unpaid care work, teleworking and wellbeing.

The European Union (EU) is committed to working collectively to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM), as part of broader efforts to combat all forms of violence against women and girls, and to supporting the efforts of its Member States in this field. The European Commission has undertaken to assess EU efforts to combat FGM every year, on or around 6 February – the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation. This publication is a further update of an 'at a glance' note ...

Combating gender-based cyber-violence

At a Glance 08-12-2021

As the world moves online, forms of violence that already affect women and girls disproportionately are following suit, and digital technologies are enabling them to take on new guises. The EU does not have a legislative framework to address this gender-based violence, despite its harmful impacts on individuals, society and democracy. A legislative-initiative report calling for EU legislation to fight gender-based cyber-violence, and provide its victims across the Union with equal protection is expected ...

Violence against women is a violation of human rights and a form of gender-based discrimination. Rooted in inequalities between men and women, it takes many forms. Estimates of the scale of the problem are alarming. Such violence has a major impact on victims and imposes a significant cost burden on society. The instruments put in place by the United Nations and Council of Europe, including the latter's 'Istanbul Convention', to which the EU plans to accede, are benchmarks in efforts to combat violence ...

The Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention) is the first instrument in Europe to set legally binding standards specifically to prevent gender-based violence, protect victims of violence and punish perpetrators. EU accession to the Istanbul Convention is one of the priorities in the EU 2020-2025 gender equality strategy. The EU signed the Convention in June 2017. Accession now requires a Council Decision and prior ...

The European Union has adopted gender mainstreaming as its official approach to gender equality, alongside targeted action to eliminate discrimination and advance women's empowerment. From 25 to 28 October 2021, the European Parliament's committees and delegations are holding a series of events aimed at highlighting the importance of gender equality and gender mainstreaming across different policy domains.

Despite the extent of gender-based violence and the harm it causes, the European Union (EU) does not currently have a specific legal instrument to address it. An own-initiative legislative report setting out proposals for strengthening the EU’s response by identifying gender-based violence at EU level as an area of serious crime is expected to be put to the vote during the plenary session in September.

Article 8 TFEU commits the European Union and its Member States to eliminating inequalities and promoting the principle of equality between women and men in all their actions. As set out in the EU Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025, achieving gender equality in the European Union is a joint responsibility, requiring action by all EU institutions, Member States and EU agencies, in partnership with civil society and women’s organisations, social partners and the private sector. Since 2003, when Parliament ...

Given the extent of inequality and discrimination, challenges to fundamental rights and citizens' lack of awareness of the rights they enjoy, the EU institutions have recognised the importance of funding to protect core EU values and fundamental rights, support civil society organisations and sustain open, democratic and inclusive societies. In May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a new Rights and Values programme as part of the new 2021-2027 Multiannual ...