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This study analyses the gaps and challenges in the EU corporate income tax (CIT) legislation, and evaluate the European Added Value (EAV) of potential policy options to address these challenges. A thorough comparative economic analysis is made of the EAV of a series of scenarios, based upon the policy options identified. The results confirm that complexity remains by far the greatest factor behind both the CIT gap and the high level of compliance costs for businesses. Insufficient transparency, lack ...

Value added tax (VAT) is a consumption tax borne by the final consumer. It is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget. However, the existing rules governing intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system is still ‘transitional’. This framework presents problems such as vulnerability to fraud, compliance costs for businesses and also a heavy administrative burden for national authorities. It is under review along the lines ...

The fact that print and digital publications have been subject to separate value added tax (VAT) rates essentially means that products that are considered to be comparable and substitutable have been treated differently to one another. This situation resulted from rules which, on the one hand, allowed Member States to apply reduced rates to printed publications, but on the other excluded this possibility for digital publications. In addition, the evolution in the VAT framework means that VAT on digital ...

More flexible VAT rates

Briefing 25-10-2018

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, a very efficient consumption tax. However, the rules governing value added tax as applied to intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system is both complicated and vulnerable to fraud. Businesses doing cross-border trade face high compliance costs and the administrative burden of national tax administrations is also excessive ...

Common corporate tax base (CCTB)

Briefing 15-06-2018

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals on a common corporate tax base (CCTB) and a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). The 2016 CCTB provides for the determination of a single set of rules for calculation of the corporate tax base. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different ...

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals: on a common corporate tax base (CCTB), and on a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). Building on the 2016 CCTB proposal, the 2016 CCCTB proposal introduces the consolidation aspect of this double initiative. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal ...

In 2016, the Commission decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base proposal, but this time in a two-step approach, with two interconnected proposals. Parliament, which is only consulted, is due to vote on the proposals during its March plenary session.

This proposal was part of a package of proposed EU legislation that aims to modernise the VAT regime for cross-border B2C e-commerce. It provides the basis for the underlying IT infrastructure and the necessary cooperation by Member States to ensure the success of the extension of the mini-one-stop-shop (MOSS). It contains provisions relating to – among other things – the exchange of information between competent authorities of Member States, and the control of transactions and taxable persons, as ...

The field of direct taxation is not directly governed by European Union rules. Nevertheless, a number of directives and the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) establish harmonised standards for taxation of companies and private individuals. Moreover, communications have been issued emphasising the importance of preventing tax evasion and double taxation. Tax rulings for large companies in certain Member States, which could potentially result in distortions of competition ...

Indirect taxation

EU Fact Sheets 01-11-2017

Indirect taxes include value added tax (VAT) and excise duties on alcohol, tobacco and energy. The common VAT system is generally applicable to goods and services that are bought and sold for use or consumption in the EU. Excise duties are levied on the sale or use of specific products. EU legislative activities are aimed at coordinating and harmonising VAT law and harmonising duties on alcohol, tobacco and energy with the aim of ensuring the proper functioning of the internal market.