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Many financial institutions have warned that the transition to a low-carbon economy could cause a major shock to fossil fuel valuation, with the potential for systemic risk. This paper discusses disclosure commitments and empirical evidence in order to gauge the exposure of banks towards fossil fuel assets as well as the consequent implications for banks’ balance sheets and for financial stability.

This briefing paper describes and evaluates the law and economics of institution(al) protection schemes. Throughout our analysis, we use Europe’s largest such scheme, that of German savings banks, as paradigm. We find strengths and weaknesses: Strong network-internal monitoring and early warning seems to be an important contributor to IPS network success. Similarly, the geographical quasi-cartel encourages banks to build a strong client base, including SME, in all regions. Third, the growth of ...

The present study provides an analysis of the existing Institutional Protection Schemes (IPSs) in the Banking Union within the context of the ongoing review of the bank crisis management and deposit insurance framework. The paper examines how IPSs form an integral part of the European deposit insurance protection architecture, specifically in Germany and Austria, and how IPS operate alongside National Resolution Authorities and National Deposit Insurance Schemes

This note is prepared in view of an ordinary public hearing with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB), Elke König, which will take place on 14 March 2022. This briefing (1) addresses mainly the situation of Sberbank Europe that has been declared failing-or-likely-to-fail, giving background information (i) on the bank, (ii) the process, (iii) the actions taken, (iv) the public interest assessments made, and (v) the implications for deposit guarantee schemes. In view of the current situation ...

As a system for standardised payment instructions and messaging services, SWIFT has become the basis for most global financial transactions. On 2 March 2022, the Council decided to cut seven Russian banks from the SWIFT network, as part of a wider sanctions package, including sanctions against Russia's central bank.

This note is prepared in view of an ordinary public hearing with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB), Elke König, which will take place on 1 December 2021. This briefing addresses the following topics: (i) cooperation with other authorities, (ii) home/host authorities and the issue of internal MREL, (iii) evolution of MREL stock and shortfalls, (iv) contributions to the Single Resolution Fund, and (v) summaries of external papers on the status quo of impediments to resolvability.

The original full study presents data from 27 banking groups in 10 EU Member States, where it is found that banks have used COVID-19 relief measures extensively, with some cross-country differences as for the intensity of use. Flexibility in risk classification does not seem to have impaired banks’ ability to report and recognise risk properly, even for loans under moratoria. The findings suggest that the impact of the measures on banks’ credit supply has been overall positive and mainly driven ...

To efficiently resolve a bank that is failing or likely to fail, and for which resolution is deemed in the public interest, it is important that impediments that hamper its resolvability are removed. Noting the limited public disclosure of banks and the Single Resolution Board (SRB), this paper assesses improvements in resolvability of a sample of 72 eurozone banks based on some key indicators. The main findings suggest that resolvability has marginally improved since the SRB resumed its full legal ...

All jurisdictions tailor their prudential policies to bank size, with generally more complex – though not necessarily more stringent – requirements for larger banks. This paper compares such policies in the euro area and United States, in the context of the differences in banking system structures and legal frameworks. There are vastly more stand-alone smaller banks and credit unions in the US than in the euro area. The US approach to prudential requirements is generally more differentiated by bank ...

This in-depth analysis provides evidence on differences in the practice of supervising large banks in the UK and in the euro area. It identifies the diverging institutional architecture (partially supranationalised vs. national oversight) as a pivotal determinant for a higher effectiveness of supervisory decision making in the UK. The ECB is likely to take a more stringent stance in prudential supervision than UK authorities. The setting of risk weights and the design of macroprudential stress test ...