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The Women’s Rights and Gender Equality Committee decided to send a delegation to The Hague on 23-25 May 2022 to find out what is being done to prevent and combat human trafficking. This Briefing written by the Policy Department C describes the actions undertaken by the National Government, the Judiciary, the European Commission, the European Parliament, the European agencies and the United Nations. It provides also experts' opinions.

The paper presents the findings of a study on external policy measures adopted by the European Union and like-minded partners to address modern slavery in third countries. The study is intended to support the European Parliament in monitoring EU external action and initiating the refinement of existing or the adoption of new external policy instruments relating to forced labour and modern slavery The study provides a review of the different external policy tools available to the EU to contribute ...

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has forced millions of people to flee the country or move to safety within Ukraine's borders, resulting in one of the largest European humanitarian crises in recent times. The chaos generated by the conflict has exponentially increased the risk of human trafficking and exploitation, especially of the most vulnerable persons.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has forced hundreds of thousands of people, mostly women and children, to flee the country and seek shelter in neighbouring countries. Ukraine's civilian population is being subjected to shelling and violence, while outside Ukraine's borders, the international humanitarian community has quickly mobilised to provide support. As the humanitarian situation deteriorates, children are particularly vulnerable.

Even – or especially – in complex, emergency situations, a gender perspective is vital in order to take into account the specific needs of women and men and the different risks to which they are exposed. Humanitarian actors are calling for a gender-sensitive response to the Ukraine crisis, to help tackle barriers to accessing vital services, address increased risks of gender-based violence and facilitate the reception and integration of refugees.

This Study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee – after assessing the state-of-the-art of prostitution regulations in EU MSs and the current situation of sex trafficking and related data in the EU – identifies and evaluates cross-border problems/risks related to differing national EU MSs’ regulations and suggests future EU legislation to reduce them, thus preventing women from being trafficked ...

On 14 April 2021, the European Commission presented its new 2021-2025 strategy on combating trafficking in human beings – 10 years after the adoption of Directive 2011/36/EU, the core EU instrument addressing this phenomenon and protecting its victims. Despite some progress achieved in recent years, a number of challenges still lie ahead. Human trafficking is not only a serious and borderless crime, but also a lucrative business, driven by demand for sexual (and other) services. Criminals exploit ...

Plenary round-up – February 2021

At a Glance 12-02-2021

The main debates held during the February 2021 plenary session concerned the state of play of the EU's Covid 19 vaccination strategy and the de facto abortion ban in Poland. Members also debated democratic scrutiny of social media platforms and the protection of fundamental rights, including the challenges ahead for women's rights more than 25 years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action The impact of coronavirus on young people and sport, relief measures for the transport sector, ...

Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims is the main EU legislative tool addressing this phenomenon. It had to be transposed into national law by 2013. However, certain obstacles to full implementation remain almost ten years after its adoption. At the February plenary session, the European Parliament is due to debate an own-initiative report assessing the directive's effectiveness.

Around 90 % of those who cross the external European Union (EU) borders illegally do so with the assistance of migrant smugglers. Furthermore, the facilitation of irregular migration is a highly profitable criminal activity, in particular when compared with the relatively low risks incurred. Even though detections of illegal border crossings are currently at their lowest level since 2013, the migrant smuggling business shows sustained high levels of demand. This demand is not only due to the fact ...