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The Digital Markets Act (DMA) entered into force on 1 November 2022. The DMA rules apply to large companies – designated as gatekeepers – that provide core platform services such as marketplaces, app stores, online search engines or cloud computing services in the EU. Most of the act's provisions will apply as of 2 May 2023, when the gatekeeper designation procedure will start. That designation follows notification by the respective platforms to the Commission. Operators designated as gatekeepers ...

The Digital Services Act (DSA) entered into force on 16 November 2022. The DSA rules apply to categories of online intermediary services according to their role, size and impact on the online ecosystem. Online intermediary services such as online marketplaces, app stores, collaborative economy platforms, search engines and social media platforms will have to comply with a range of obligations to ensure transparency, accountability and responsibility for their actions. Operators designated as very ...

This European added value assessment seeks to support a European Parliament legislative own-initiative report on digitalisation and administrative law (2021/2161(INL)), asking the European Commission to present a legislative proposal on an EU law on administrative procedure. The study investigates the current state of play with regard to digitalisation and the use of digital tools in EU public administration. The analysis identifies five regulatory gaps and their impact on citizens and businesses ...

Digital services act

Briefing 17-11-2022

EU lawmakers have agreed on the digital services act (DSA), which aims to ensure fairness, trust and safety in the digital environment. The regulation entered into force in November 2022. The DSA puts in place a framework of layered responsibilities targeted at different types of online intermediary services, including network infrastructure services (e.g. cloud and webhosting), online platform services (e.g. app stores and social media platforms), and services provided by very large online platforms ...

The way children use digital technologies has changed a lot over the past decade. Most children go online using a smartphone, and do so almost twice as much as 10 years ago. They also use the internet at an earlier age than did children 10 years ago. Although the internet provides many opportunities for kids to learn and explore, to be creative or to interact with their friends and family, it also entails many risks such as cyberbullying, age-inappropriate content, disinformation and sexual abuse ...

Recent events have multiplied concerns about potential fragmentation of the internet into a multitude of non-interoperable and disconnected 'splinternets'. Composed of thousands of compatible autonomous systems, the internet is by definition technically divided. Yet, the internet was also designed to be an open and global technical infrastructure. The unity and openness of the internet appear to be under great pressure from political, commercial and technological developments. This report explores ...

In 2021, 95 % of young Europeans aged 16‑29 years reported using the internet every day. However, the share of young people with basic or above basic digital skills ranges from 93 % in Finland, 92 % in Malta, 89 % in Croatia and 87 % in Greece and the Netherlands, to just 49 % in Bulgaria and 46 % in Romania, with the EU average standing at 71 %. Some 76 % of all young people reported that they had performed basic computer tasks such as copying or moving a file or a folder, while slightly lower shares ...

Adopting the digital services act

At a Glance 29-06-2022

In December 2020, the European Commission published a proposal for a digital services act (DSA) designed to revamp EU content moderation rules and promote a transparent and safer online environment. Parliament is set to vote during its July 2022 plenary session on the political agreement reached with the Council.

In December 2020, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on contestable and fair markets in the digital sector, otherwise referred to as the digital markets act (DMA). During its July 2022 plenary session, Parliament is set to vote on the political agreement reached with the Council by its negotiators.

Digital transformation concerns us all, in every aspect of our lives, from learning, working, communicating, doing business, to interacting with administrations, shopping and enjoying culture. The online environment has become very often our first and sometimes our only space for interaction. To steer this process so that no one is left behind, the European Commission tabled a draft declaration on digital rights and principles for a human-centred digital transformation. The declaration would serve ...