52

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Keyword
Date

Horizon Europe: Framework programme for research and innovation 2021–2027

02-07-2021

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe introduces new features such as the European ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe introduces new features such as the European Innovation Council, missions to promote research results, and new forms of partnerships. Horizon Europe also aims at reducing administrative burdens and promoting the concept of open science. More operational synergies are expected through better linkage with other EU programmes. In March 2019, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement on most aspects of Horizon Europe. However, the financial aspects were only settled in December 2020 as part of the broader MFF negotiations, together with the sensitive issue of third-country association. The final text was adopted in April 2021 and entered into force retroactively from 1 January 2021. Third edition of a briefing originally drafted by Cemal Karakas. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Communication on the global approach to research and innovation: Pre-legislative synthesis of national, regional and local positions on the European Commission's initiative

23-06-2021

This Briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of the EU system of multilevel governance. An EPRS analysis of the ...

This Briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of the EU system of multilevel governance. An EPRS analysis of the positions of partner governmental organisations at EU, national, regional and local levels suggests that they would like the following main considerations to be reflected in the discussion of the communication on the global approach to research and innovation (R&I): • Governmental organisations stress that research and innovation (R&I) are essential for the global competitiveness of the EU and greater investment is needed to ensure that the EU does not lose its leading position. There is a particular emphasis on the need for SMEs and regional clusters to take part in innovation cooperation, building on existing programmes such as Eurostars. • Public authorities state that third-country participation is essential for a successful R&I policy. However, the exact balance between openness and ‘strategic autonomy’ is harder to define. Some organisations state that systematic cooperation with third countries should be simplified in terms of red tape. Others express concerns about lower international participation in successive EU R&I programmes. • Various priority regions to be targeted were emphasised, namely, the broader European neighbourhood, the Mediterranean region (PRIMA and BlueMed programmes cited as positive examples) and Africa. Other respondents emphasised the need to deepen ties with strong research capacity countries, such as Australia, Canada, Japan and the UK. • Governmental organisations share the view that mobility of researchers is vital in both the European and international context. At the same time, EU R&I programmes should seek to prevent a 'brain drain' both away from the EU and within the EU, by promoting and incentivising research careers. • Local and regional authorities also call on the Commission to strengthen the links between R&I policies and EU cohesion policies, including regional funds.

European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT): Regulation and new strategic innovation agenda

03-06-2021

On 11 July 2019, the Commission presented its new legislative package on the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The package consists of a recast of both the previous regulation governing the EIT and a new strategic innovation agenda. Created in 2008, the EIT is dedicated to increasing competitiveness, sustainable economic growth and job creation by promoting ‘knowledge triangle activities’ (higher education, research and innovation). It operates through 'knowledge and innovation ...

On 11 July 2019, the Commission presented its new legislative package on the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The package consists of a recast of both the previous regulation governing the EIT and a new strategic innovation agenda. Created in 2008, the EIT is dedicated to increasing competitiveness, sustainable economic growth and job creation by promoting ‘knowledge triangle activities’ (higher education, research and innovation). It operates through 'knowledge and innovation communities' (KICs) that address specific societal challenges, such as digitalisation, urban mobility, climate and raw materials and was part of Horizon 2020 and will come uner the new Horizon Europe programme. Interinstitutional negotiations on both files concluded in February 2021 and the texts agreed at first reading were formally adopted by Parliament and Council in turn. After being signed on 20 May 2021, both entered into force retroactively from 1 January 2021. Third edition of a briefing originally drafted by Cemal Karakas. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

EU Space programme

12-05-2021

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a budget of €16 billion to finance EU space activities during the 2021-2027 period. The majority of this would be allocated to Galileo and EGNOS, the EU's global and regional satellite navigation systems; around a third would be allocated to Copernicus, the EU's Earth Observation programme; and the remainder would be earmarked for security, such as the Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) programme and the new Governmental Satellite Communication initiative ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a budget of €16 billion to finance EU space activities during the 2021-2027 period. The majority of this would be allocated to Galileo and EGNOS, the EU's global and regional satellite navigation systems; around a third would be allocated to Copernicus, the EU's Earth Observation programme; and the remainder would be earmarked for security, such as the Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) programme and the new Governmental Satellite Communication initiative (GOVSATCOM) to support border protection, civil protection and humanitarian interventions. The main aims of the new space programme are to secure EU leadership in space activities, foster innovative industries, safeguard autonomous access to space and simplify governance. The European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Agency will be transformed into a new EU Agency for the Space Programme. In April 2019, after trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement on the programme, which was later incorporated by the Parliament in its first-reading position. The agreement covered most of the programme content but not the budget, relations with third countries, or operational security. Further trilogue negotiations, alongside the conclusion of MFF negotiations, helped to secure a comprehensive political agreement on 16 December 2020. The EU space programme will have a total budget of €14.8 billion. The agreed text was then adopted by the Council and Parliament in April 2021. Third edition of a briefing originally drafted by Cemal Karakas. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Institute of Innovation and Technology

21-04-2021

During its April plenary session, the European Parliament will hold a joint debate on EU research and innovation. This will include a discussion of two proposals relating to the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT): a recast EIT regulation and an EIT strategic innovation agenda for the 2021-2027 period. Parliament and the Council have reached political agreement on both and Parliament is now due to vote on adopting the two texts.

During its April plenary session, the European Parliament will hold a joint debate on EU research and innovation. This will include a discussion of two proposals relating to the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT): a recast EIT regulation and an EIT strategic innovation agenda for the 2021-2027 period. Parliament and the Council have reached political agreement on both and Parliament is now due to vote on adopting the two texts.

Revision of the TEN-E Regulation: EU guidelines for new energy infrastructure

25-02-2021

On 15 December 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2013 regulation on trans-European networks in energy (TEN-E). The revised TEN-E Regulation is currently under discussion in the European Parliament and the Council, which will prepare their negotiating positions. The 2013 TEN-E Regulation sets out EU guidelines for cross-border energy infrastructure and outlines the process for selecting projects of common interest (PCI). PCIs are infrastructure projects considered essential ...

On 15 December 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2013 regulation on trans-European networks in energy (TEN-E). The revised TEN-E Regulation is currently under discussion in the European Parliament and the Council, which will prepare their negotiating positions. The 2013 TEN-E Regulation sets out EU guidelines for cross-border energy infrastructure and outlines the process for selecting projects of common interest (PCI). PCIs are infrastructure projects considered essential for delivering on EU objectives in the energy field, including improved interconnection between national markets, greater competitiveness, security of supply, and promotion of renewable energy sources. The list of PCIs is updated every two years. Some PCI projects are eligible for EU financing from the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF). The revised TEN-E Regulation would align closely with the ambitious climate neutrality objectives of the European Green Deal, primarily by supporting energy infrastructure that consolidates new and existing clean energy technologies, and by ending policy and financial support for fossil fuel projects, which would no longer be included on PCI lists and thus unable to receive CEF funding.

EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement: An analytical overview

02-02-2021

This EPRS publication seeks to provide an analytical overview of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), which was agreed between the two parties on 24 December and signed by them on 30 December 2020, and has been provisionally applied since 1 January 2021. The European Parliament is currently considering the Agreement with a view to voting on giving its consent to conclusion by the Council on behalf of the Union. The paper analyses many ...

This EPRS publication seeks to provide an analytical overview of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), which was agreed between the two parties on 24 December and signed by them on 30 December 2020, and has been provisionally applied since 1 January 2021. The European Parliament is currently considering the Agreement with a view to voting on giving its consent to conclusion by the Council on behalf of the Union. The paper analyses many of the areas covered in the agreement, including the institutional framework and arrangements for dispute settlement, trade in goods, services and investment, digital trade, energy, the level playing field, transport, social security coordination and visas for short-term visits, fisheries, law enforcement and judicial coordination in criminal matters, and participation in Union programmes. It looks at the main provisions of the Agreement in each area, setting them in context, and also gives an overview of the two parties' published negotiating positions in the respective areas.

EU strategy for offshore renewable energy

11-12-2020

The European Commission recently adopted a strategy to develop offshore renewable energies in all of Europe's seas. This could make a major contribution towards the decarbonisation of energy consumption across the EU. The strategy aims to increase offshore wind capacity to 25 times current levels, and facilitate the commercialisation of new offshore renewable technologies, such as tidal, wave and floating solar energy. The Commission will provide a supportive regulatory framework and increase funding ...

The European Commission recently adopted a strategy to develop offshore renewable energies in all of Europe's seas. This could make a major contribution towards the decarbonisation of energy consumption across the EU. The strategy aims to increase offshore wind capacity to 25 times current levels, and facilitate the commercialisation of new offshore renewable technologies, such as tidal, wave and floating solar energy. The Commission will provide a supportive regulatory framework and increase funding for offshore renewable technologies, while looking to maintain Europe's global technological and market leadership in this sector.

Offshore wind energy in Europe

30-10-2020

Offshore wind is a highly promising renewable energy source (RES) that could make a major contribution to global and European efforts to decarbonise the economy by 2050 and keep global warming to around 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, as set out in the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The European Commission expects the EU to produce at least 240 gigawatts (GW) of global offshore wind power capacity by 2050, while international organisations specialising in the energy field are even more optimistic ...

Offshore wind is a highly promising renewable energy source (RES) that could make a major contribution to global and European efforts to decarbonise the economy by 2050 and keep global warming to around 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, as set out in the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The European Commission expects the EU to produce at least 240 gigawatts (GW) of global offshore wind power capacity by 2050, while international organisations specialising in the energy field are even more optimistic about the prospects of this energy source. Europe accounts for 80 % of global offshore wind capacity and is the dominant region in terms of technologies and manufacturing. Offshore wind accounts for 210 000 jobs in Europe (over half of all jobs in wind energy), and this number should increase further with greater investment. Wind is the only offshore RES that is currently deployable on a commercial scale and there is vast untapped potential in the world's oceans and seas, even if only some potential sites can be developed. Offshore wind has a higher capacity and more consistent output than other variable RES, with the International Energy Agency describing it as a unique 'variable baseload' technology that could help to integrate the decarbonised energy systems of the future. A major constraint on offshore wind has been the difficulty of building fixed constructions in depths greater than 60 metres. Floating bases for offshore wind turbines could then prove to be a game changing technology, allowing much wider exploitation of wind resources. Many of the leading projects for commercialising these floating technologies are based in Europe. Hybrid projects linking offshore wind to other uses – such as hydrogen production or battery storage – represent another important avenue for offshore wind to contribute more widely to our energy systems. The Commission is expected to adopt a new strategy for offshore RES in 2020, proposing further EU action to scale up deployment of offshore wind and invest in its underlying technologies. Some EU Member States have set their own indicative targets for offshore wind deployment by 2030, accompanied by a range of support schemes. The European Parliament has been supportive of offshore wind energy, in particular the potential for a North Sea offshore grid (energy hub).

On the path to 'strategic autonomy': The EU in an evolving geopolitical environment

28-09-2020

In confronting the EU with an unprecedented crisis, the coronavirus outbreak is testing the bloc's unity, but may also accelerate the construction of EU strategic autonomy, as the roadmap for recovery is implemented. Political will, still in the making, and the capacity to act are key prerequisites for achieving effective European strategic autonomy. The EU is increasingly at risk of becoming a 'playground' for global powers in a world dominated by geopolitics. Building European strategic autonomy ...

In confronting the EU with an unprecedented crisis, the coronavirus outbreak is testing the bloc's unity, but may also accelerate the construction of EU strategic autonomy, as the roadmap for recovery is implemented. Political will, still in the making, and the capacity to act are key prerequisites for achieving effective European strategic autonomy. The EU is increasingly at risk of becoming a 'playground' for global powers in a world dominated by geopolitics. Building European strategic autonomy on a horizontal – cross-policy – basis would strengthen the EU's multilateral action and reduce dependence on external actors, to make the EU less vulnerable to external threats; while promoting a level playing field that benefits everyone. The EU could thus reap the full dividend of its integration and possibly benefit from greater economic gains. To build European strategic autonomy, the EU may choose to use the still 'under-used' or 'unused' potential of the Lisbon Treaty, with the European Council having a key role to play in triggering some of the Treaty provisions, particularly in foreign and security policy. European strategic autonomy may also result from a deepening of the EU integration process. Nevertheless, it remains to be seen whether the Member States will wish to grasp the opportunity offered by the Conference on the Future of Europe to deepen the European project.

Upcoming events

21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Inside the room - Shaping Europe, 1992-2010
Other event -
EPRS
21-09-2021
Putting the 'e' in e-health
Workshop -
STOA
27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
Other event -
BECA

Partners