16

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

Protection of animals during transport: Data on live animal transport

07-07-2021

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to and from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on animal welfare. However, in some areas weaknesses still persist, largely ...

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to and from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on animal welfare. However, in some areas weaknesses still persist, largely due to insufficient implementation. In the light of these conclusions, and bearing in mind its 2012-2015 animal welfare strategy, the European Commission announced its intention to revise the animal welfare legislation, including legislation on animal transport. Despite the action taken, however, in recent years, repeated breaches of the rules, resulting in accidents and severe animal welfare crises, have been highlighted by EU and national control bodies and by animal welfare organisations. On 19 June 2020, the European Parliament set up the Committee of Inquiry on the Protection of Animals during Transport (ANIT). The work of the committee focused on investigating how EU rules laid down in Regulation 1/2005 are being implemented by Member States and enforced by the European Commission. It held public hearings with the participation of stakeholders, representatives of national authorities and experts. Insight from these debates fed into the committee's report and recommendations to Council and the Commission. This briefing is one of four requested by the ANIT committee to provide research and analysis following the results of a questionnaire sent out by the committee to Member States. It gives an overview of available data on the transport of live animals.

Protection of animals during transport: Sanctions for infringements

30-06-2021

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to or from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on the welfare of animals. However, in some areas weaknesses still persist ...

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to or from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on the welfare of animals. However, in some areas weaknesses still persist, largely due to insufficient implementation. In light of these conclusions, and bearing in mind its 2012-2015 animal welfare strategy, the European Commission developed guidelines for handling animals during transport, to be disseminated and used for training of transport personnel and enforcement agents. Despite these measures, however, in recent years, repeated breaches of the rules, resulting in accidents and severe animal welfare crises, have been highlighted by EU and national control bodies and by animal welfare organisations. On 19 June 2020, the European Parliament set up the Committee of Inquiry on the Protection of Animals during Transport (ANIT). The work of the committee focused on investigating how EU rules are being implemented by Member States and enforced by the European Commission. It held public hearings with the participation of stakeholders, representatives of national authorities, and experts. Insight from these debates fed into the committee's report and recommendations to Council and the Commission. This briefing is one of four requested by the ANIT committee to provide research and analysis following the results of a questionnaire sent out by the Committee to Member States. It focuses on one of the topics investigated by the Committee, namely the systems of sanctions applied by Member States for breaches of Regulation 1/2005.

Protection of animals during transport: Guidelines and research

30-06-2021

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to or from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on the welfare of animals. However, in some areas weaknesses still persist ...

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to or from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on the welfare of animals. However, in some areas weaknesses still persist, largely due to insufficient implementation. In light of these conclusions, and bearing in mind its 2012-2015 animal welfare strategy, the European Commission developed guidelines for handling animals during transport, to be disseminated and used for training of transport personnel and enforcement agents. Despite these measures, however, in recent years, repeated breaches of the rules, resulting in accidents and severe animal welfare crises, have been highlighted by EU and national control bodies and by animal welfare organisations. On 19 June 2020, the European Parliament set up the Committee of Inquiry on the Protection of Animals during Transport (ANIT). The work of the committee focussed on investigating how EU rules are being implemented by Member States and enforced by the European Commission. It held public hearings with the participation of stakeholders, representatives of national authorities, and experts. Insight from these debates fed into the committee's report and recommendations to the Council and the Commission. This briefing is one of four requested by the ANIT Committee to provide research and analysis following the results of a questionnaire sent out by the Committee to Member States. It focuses on one of the topics investigated by the Committee, namely the use and dissemination in Member States of guidelines on the protection of animals during transport. It also gives an overview of available species-specific research on the welfare of animals during transport.

Protection of animals during transport: Training of personnel and enforcement agents

30-06-2021

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to and from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on the welfare of animals. However, in some areas weaknesses persist, largely ...

Each year, millions of live animals are transported by road, sea, rail and air within, and to and from, the European Union, for a number of reasons, such as slaughter, fattening or breeding. To protect their welfare during those journeys, the EU adopted Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. An evaluation of the regulation showed that, when correctly implemented and enforced, it had a positive impact on the welfare of animals. However, in some areas weaknesses persist, largely owing to insufficient implementation. In light of these conclusions, and bearing in mind its 2012-2015 animal welfare strategy, the European Commission developed guidelines for handling animals during transport, to be disseminated and used for training of transport personnel and enforcement agents. Despite these measures, however, in recent years, repeated breaches of the rules, resulting in accidents and severe animal welfare crises, have been highlighted by EU and national control bodies and by animal welfare organisations. On 19 June 2020, the European Parliament set up the Committee of Inquiry on the Protection of Animals during Transport (ANIT). The work of the committee focused on investigating how EU rules are being implemented by Member States and enforced by the European Commission. It held public hearings with the participation of stakeholders, representatives of national authorities, and experts. Insight from these debates fed into the committee's report and recommendations to the Council and the Commission. This briefing is one of four requested by the ANIT committee to provide research and analysis following the results of a questionnaire sent out by the committee to Member States. It focuses on one of the topics investigated by the committee, namely how Member States organise training for personnel handling animals during transport and for staff tasked with enforcing the rules.

European Citizens' Initiative: 'End the cage age'

02-06-2021

Throughout the EU, millions of animals are reared in cages, in conditions that seriously harm their welfare. A European Citizens' Initiative, 'End the Cage Age', calls on the European Commission to end the practice of keeping animals in cages and to propose legislation to prohibit their use. In response to this initiative, the European Parliament is expected to hold a debate on the subject and vote a resolution during its June I plenary session.

Throughout the EU, millions of animals are reared in cages, in conditions that seriously harm their welfare. A European Citizens' Initiative, 'End the Cage Age', calls on the European Commission to end the practice of keeping animals in cages and to propose legislation to prohibit their use. In response to this initiative, the European Parliament is expected to hold a debate on the subject and vote a resolution during its June I plenary session.

CAP Amending Regulation (CMO): Amending regulations on the CMO for agricultural products, quality schemes and measures for remote regions

19-01-2021

On 1 July 2018, as part of the work on the EU's 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission proposed a package of three regulations with the aim of reshaping and modernising the common agricultural policy (CAP). One of these proposals, the Amending Regulation, introduces changes to rules governing the common market organisation (CMO) in agricultural products (including the rules on wine), the EU quality schemes (geographical indications) and the support measures for remote ...

On 1 July 2018, as part of the work on the EU's 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission proposed a package of three regulations with the aim of reshaping and modernising the common agricultural policy (CAP). One of these proposals, the Amending Regulation, introduces changes to rules governing the common market organisation (CMO) in agricultural products (including the rules on wine), the EU quality schemes (geographical indications) and the support measures for remote regions. The aim is to equip agricultural markets and support measures to face new challenges, update provisions, simplify procedures and ensure consistency with other regulations on the future CAP. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP amending regulation (CMO)

14-10-2020

The 'amending regulation' is part of a set of three legislative proposals presented by the European Commission with the aim of reshaping and modernising the EU's common agricultural policy (CAP) for 2021 to 2027. It introduces changes to five regulations, including regarding the single common market organisation (CMO). Based on the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) during the previous legislative term, Parliament is expected to debate the framework ...

The 'amending regulation' is part of a set of three legislative proposals presented by the European Commission with the aim of reshaping and modernising the EU's common agricultural policy (CAP) for 2021 to 2027. It introduces changes to five regulations, including regarding the single common market organisation (CMO). Based on the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) during the previous legislative term, Parliament is expected to debate the framework during the October II plenary session and adopt its position for negotiations with the Council.

EU food quality scheme

08-07-2019

The quality of European agricultural products often relies on their geographical origins, the traditional recipes used to make them, and the methods used in production and processing. These human and geographical factors are intrinsic to making a product unique. In 1992, the EU developed a quality scheme for foodstuffs, including the designation of their origin. The objectives of the EU quality scheme are to provide consumers with clear information, allowing them to make a more informed choice, and ...

The quality of European agricultural products often relies on their geographical origins, the traditional recipes used to make them, and the methods used in production and processing. These human and geographical factors are intrinsic to making a product unique. In 1992, the EU developed a quality scheme for foodstuffs, including the designation of their origin. The objectives of the EU quality scheme are to provide consumers with clear information, allowing them to make a more informed choice, and to indicate the added value of a given product. The protection of European local and gastronomic traditions, especially against imitation in third countries, is another important aim of the regulations. Consequently, the EU's engagement in protecting its registered products on the global market is a contentious issue in the negotiation of many trade agreements.

Animal medicines package

17-10-2018

In September 2014, the European Commission put forward a package of three proposals to update the legislative framework for veterinary medicines. More stringent rules are intended to tackle antimicrobial resistance and to improve the availability of veterinary medicines in the EU. During its October II plenary session, the European Parliament is expected to vote on the texts agreed in trilogue negotiations.

In September 2014, the European Commission put forward a package of three proposals to update the legislative framework for veterinary medicines. More stringent rules are intended to tackle antimicrobial resistance and to improve the availability of veterinary medicines in the EU. During its October II plenary session, the European Parliament is expected to vote on the texts agreed in trilogue negotiations.

EU animal welfare strategy, 2012-2015: State of play and possible next steps

11-10-2016

In recent decades, awareness of and concern for animal welfare have been constantly growing among citizens, businesses and policy-makers. Two Eurobarometer surveys – from 2006 and 2016 – revealed its increasing resonance with public opinion. The topic has been on the EU policy agenda for over 40 years, which has helped achieve considerable improvements in the living conditions of farm animals, and establish some of the world's highest animal welfare standards. In 2012, the EU adopted a strategy for ...

In recent decades, awareness of and concern for animal welfare have been constantly growing among citizens, businesses and policy-makers. Two Eurobarometer surveys – from 2006 and 2016 – revealed its increasing resonance with public opinion. The topic has been on the EU policy agenda for over 40 years, which has helped achieve considerable improvements in the living conditions of farm animals, and establish some of the world's highest animal welfare standards. In 2012, the EU adopted a strategy for the protection and welfare of animals covering the period until 2015. When this strategy was about to expire, discussions arose about its continuation and possible further policy steps. The European Commission has voiced its intention to focus on finalising the planned actions that are still outstanding and on improving the enforcement of existing rules. A previously envisaged proposal for an EU legislative framework on animal welfare has not been followed up. A similar approach prevailed in the Council of the EU, where Member States too have prioritised the enforcement of existing rules over the introduction of new legislation. They have backed the project of creating an animal welfare platform, which would serve as a forum for discussing all relevant matters. The European Parliament has advocated a general EU animal welfare law since the launch of the strategy. In recent resolutions, it has urged the Commission to draw up a new animal welfare strategy for the 2016-2020 period, to ensure continuity of action. Concerned about the need to uphold the high level of animal protection and the competitiveness of European producers, it has also called on the Commission to be more ambitious when including animal welfare standards in international negotiations.

Upcoming events

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Other event -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Other event -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Other event -
EPRS

Partners