35

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

Resettlement of refugees: EU framework

29-03-2019

Resettlement is one tool to help displaced persons in need of protection reach Europe safely and legally, and receive protection for as long as necessary. It is a durable solution which includes selection and transfer of refugees from a country where they seek protection to another country. Apart from providing international protection to refugees, its aim is also to strengthen solidarity and responsibility-sharing between countries. For a resettlement to take place, the United Nations Refugee Agency ...

Resettlement is one tool to help displaced persons in need of protection reach Europe safely and legally, and receive protection for as long as necessary. It is a durable solution which includes selection and transfer of refugees from a country where they seek protection to another country. Apart from providing international protection to refugees, its aim is also to strengthen solidarity and responsibility-sharing between countries. For a resettlement to take place, the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has to determine an applicant is a refugee according to the 1951 Geneva Convention, and has to identify resettlement as the most appropriate solution. On 13 July 2016, as part of the reform of the Common European Asylum System and the long-term policy on better migration management, the Commission presented a proposal which aims to provide for a permanent framework with standard common procedures for resettlement across the EU, and will complement current national and multilateral resettlement initiatives. Although a partial provisional agreement on the proposal was reached between the Parliament and Council in summer 2018, the Council has been unable to endorse that, nor agree on a mandate for further negotiations.

The proposed Return Directive (recast)

12-02-2019

On 12 September 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a recasting of the 2008 Return Directive, which stipulates common standards and procedures in Member States for returning irregular migrants who are non-EU nationals. Effectively returning irregular migrants is one of the key objectives of the European Union’s migration policy. However, Member States currently face challenges: national practices implementing the EU rules vary and the overall return rates remain below expectations ...

On 12 September 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a recasting of the 2008 Return Directive, which stipulates common standards and procedures in Member States for returning irregular migrants who are non-EU nationals. Effectively returning irregular migrants is one of the key objectives of the European Union’s migration policy. However, Member States currently face challenges: national practices implementing the EU rules vary and the overall return rates remain below expectations. The proposal was not accompanied by a Commission impact assessment. The European Parliament's Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) therefore asked the European Parliamentary Research Service to provide a targeted substitute impact assessment of the proposed recast Return Directive. The assessment considers the main expected impacts of the key provisions of the Commission proposal, focusing on the social, human rights and financial impacts, as compared to the current situation (status quo). On the basis of the legal and economic studies carried out for this impact assessment, it appears that the Commission proposal for a recast Return Directive has significant legal, social, human rights and economic implications, which in principle would have deserved consideration in the context of a proper impact assessment process conducted ex-ante by the Commission.

Implementation of the 2015 Council Decisions Establishing Provisional Measures in the Area of International Protection for the Benefit of Italy and of Greece

07-03-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, examines the EU’s mechanism of relocation of asylum seekers from Greece and Italy to other Member States. It examines the scheme in the context of the Dublin System, the hotspot approach, and the EU-Turkey Statement, recommending that asylum seekers’ interests, and rights be duly taken into account, as it is only through their full engagement ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, examines the EU’s mechanism of relocation of asylum seekers from Greece and Italy to other Member States. It examines the scheme in the context of the Dublin System, the hotspot approach, and the EU-Turkey Statement, recommending that asylum seekers’ interests, and rights be duly taken into account, as it is only through their full engagement that relocation will be successful. Relocation can become a system that provides flexibility for Member States and local host communities, as well as accommodating the agency and dignity of asylum seekers. This requires greater cooperation from receiving States, and a clearer role for a single EU legal and institutional framework to organise preference matching and rationalise efforts and resources overall.

External author

Elspeth GUILD (Centre for European Policy Studies, Brussels, Belgium), Cathryn COSTELLO (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford, UK) and Violeta MORENO-LAX (Queen Mary University of London, UK) ; Research assistance: Christina VELENTZA (Democritus University of Thrace, Greece), Daniela VITIELLO (Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy) and Natascha ZAUN (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford, UK)

European travel document for illegally staying migrants

06-09-2016

In 2014, EU Member States issued almost half a million return decisions to migrants who have no right to enter or stay on the EU territory. However, only 40% of irregularly staying migrants were actually returned to a non-EU country. Lack of valid travel documents for returnees is one of the main obstacles for a successful return. In December 2015, the European Commission put forward a proposal on a European travel document for illegally staying migrants. First-reading negotiations with the Council ...

In 2014, EU Member States issued almost half a million return decisions to migrants who have no right to enter or stay on the EU territory. However, only 40% of irregularly staying migrants were actually returned to a non-EU country. Lack of valid travel documents for returnees is one of the main obstacles for a successful return. In December 2015, the European Commission put forward a proposal on a European travel document for illegally staying migrants. First-reading negotiations with the Council have delivered a compromise which now awaits a vote in plenary.

European Border and Coast Guard Agency

30-06-2016

A proposed regulation establishing a European Border and Coast Guard Agency (the Agency) is expected to be submitted to the European Parliament for a vote at first reading during the July plenary, and subsequently to the Council for adoption. The text agreed in trilogue negotiations between the two institutions expands the Agency’s prerogatives on return operations, on migration management, the fight against cross-border crimes and search and rescue operations. Fundamental rights safeguards and the ...

A proposed regulation establishing a European Border and Coast Guard Agency (the Agency) is expected to be submitted to the European Parliament for a vote at first reading during the July plenary, and subsequently to the Council for adoption. The text agreed in trilogue negotiations between the two institutions expands the Agency’s prerogatives on return operations, on migration management, the fight against cross-border crimes and search and rescue operations. Fundamental rights safeguards and the accountability of the Agency vis-à-vis the EP and the Council have been strengthened. If a Member State opposes a Council decision to provide assistance, putting the Schengen area at risk, the other EU countries may temporarily reintroduce internal border controls.

CIA renditions and secret detention programme

02-06-2016

The CIA's extraordinary rendition and secret detention programme has again come under the scrutiny of the European Parliament, which will ask the Commission and the Council during the June plenary about the measures taken to implement Parliament's recommendations on the matter.

The CIA's extraordinary rendition and secret detention programme has again come under the scrutiny of the European Parliament, which will ask the Commission and the Council during the June plenary about the measures taken to implement Parliament's recommendations on the matter.

EU-Turkey: A crucial but challenging partnership

05-04-2016

The EU and Turkey face common and major problems, from the fight against ISIL/Da'esh to the management of displaced Syrian people. But in its latest report, the European Commission points out a number of shortcomings in the fields of freedom of expression and independence of the judiciary.

The EU and Turkey face common and major problems, from the fight against ISIL/Da'esh to the management of displaced Syrian people. But in its latest report, the European Commission points out a number of shortcomings in the fields of freedom of expression and independence of the judiciary.

The Proposal for a European Border and Coast Guard: Evolution or Revolution in External Border Management?

15-03-2016

This analysis, which critically examines the Commission proposal for the establishment of a European Border and Coast Guard, was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. The proposal significantly reinforces Frontex’s regulatory and operational tasks and provides the Agency with an additional supervisory role. The proposal does not amend the fundamental premise of operational cooperation at the ...

This analysis, which critically examines the Commission proposal for the establishment of a European Border and Coast Guard, was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. The proposal significantly reinforces Frontex’s regulatory and operational tasks and provides the Agency with an additional supervisory role. The proposal does not amend the fundamental premise of operational cooperation at the external borders, reserving executive enforcement powers to the Member States. Nonetheless, the concept of shared responsibility in the absence of shared accountability increases existing fundamental rights concerns.

External author

Jorrit Rijpma (Europa Institute, Leiden Law School, the Netherlands) ; Melanie Fink and Maarten Schippers (research assistants)

Outlook for the European Council of 17-18 December 2015: Pre-European Council Briefing

11-12-2015

At the 17-18 December 2015 meeting of the European Council, EU Heads of State or Government will discuss the migration crisis, the fight against terrorism, Economic and Monetary Union, the Internal Market, the Energy Union and the United Kingdom's renegotiation of its EU membership. On many of these issues, EU leaders will assess the implementation of their decisions from previous European Council meetings. It will be the first substantial discussion on the United Kingdom's proposals for changes ...

At the 17-18 December 2015 meeting of the European Council, EU Heads of State or Government will discuss the migration crisis, the fight against terrorism, Economic and Monetary Union, the Internal Market, the Energy Union and the United Kingdom's renegotiation of its EU membership. On many of these issues, EU leaders will assess the implementation of their decisions from previous European Council meetings. It will be the first substantial discussion on the United Kingdom's proposals for changes in the operation of the Union.

Outcome of the meeting of Heads of State or Government with Turkey on 29 November 2015

03-12-2015

EU Heads of State or Government met on 29 November 2015 with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu to discuss the ongoing migration crisis and the renewal of relations between the EU and Turkey. The main outcome of the meeting was a joint statement. Concerning migration, Turkey and the EU decided to 'activate' the Joint Action Plan[1]. The EU committed three billion euro for the refugee facility for Turkey. Turkey committed to implement readmission agreements and immediately increasing its cooperation ...

EU Heads of State or Government met on 29 November 2015 with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu to discuss the ongoing migration crisis and the renewal of relations between the EU and Turkey. The main outcome of the meeting was a joint statement. Concerning migration, Turkey and the EU decided to 'activate' the Joint Action Plan[1]. The EU committed three billion euro for the refugee facility for Turkey. Turkey committed to implement readmission agreements and immediately increasing its cooperation with the EU on migrants who are not in need of international protection. Regarding the wider dimension of EU-Turkey relations, Leaders discussed counter-terrorism, energy, trade, and Turkey's accession process. The main agreements in this context were the acceleration of the visa liberalization dialogue and the opening of new chapters in the accession. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

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