5

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Date

What if we didn't need cows for our beef?

12-07-2019

With the help of cells from a single cow, scientists can produce 175 million hamburgers. What if we didn’t need cows for our beef? Technologies for producing cultured meat and dairy products will help feeding the world in a sustainable way. What if we could produce meat without farming? New technology within reach to produce meat with a very low eco-footprint

With the help of cells from a single cow, scientists can produce 175 million hamburgers. What if we didn’t need cows for our beef? Technologies for producing cultured meat and dairy products will help feeding the world in a sustainable way. What if we could produce meat without farming? New technology within reach to produce meat with a very low eco-footprint

Food Safety Situation in Ireland and Overview of the Directorate for Health and Food Audits and Analysis, DG SANTE

28-02-2018

This study was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Environmental, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) Committee, and updates the earlier 2016 briefing. It provides an overview of the food safety situation in Ireland. It outlines the Irish food and drink industry, the structure and organisation of the food safety and control system involved in food safety in Ireland and a description of current food safety issues in Ireland. An overview of the structure and competencies of the ...

This study was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Environmental, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) Committee, and updates the earlier 2016 briefing. It provides an overview of the food safety situation in Ireland. It outlines the Irish food and drink industry, the structure and organisation of the food safety and control system involved in food safety in Ireland and a description of current food safety issues in Ireland. An overview of the structure and competencies of the Directorate for Health and Food Audits and Analysis, DG SANTE (formerly European Food and Veterinary Office) based in Ireland is also provided.

External author

Mrs S KEENAN, Campden BRI

What if all our meat were grown in a lab?

17-01-2018

Laboratory meat is grown from a small number of cells taken from a live animal and placed in a growth medium in a bioreactor where they proliferate independently. If meat cultured in this way became widely available, it could significantly alleviate the environmental problems currently caused by livestock production - such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen pollution of waterways - without requiring humans to alter their consumption patterns. This publication provides an overview of the potential ...

Laboratory meat is grown from a small number of cells taken from a live animal and placed in a growth medium in a bioreactor where they proliferate independently. If meat cultured in this way became widely available, it could significantly alleviate the environmental problems currently caused by livestock production - such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen pollution of waterways - without requiring humans to alter their consumption patterns. This publication provides an overview of the potential impacts of laboratory meat on environment, public health and farming, and makes suggestions for anticipatory policy-making in this area.

What if animal farming were not so bad for the environment?

08-02-2017

What options exist, especially in terms of new technologies, for reducing the carbon footprint of the livestock industry, how effective might they be, and what could be done to encourage their implementation? The livestock industry is responsible for around 14.5 % of global greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of this percentage is due to the emission of large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, which both result in greater global warming than carbon dioxide per gram of gas released. The main ...

What options exist, especially in terms of new technologies, for reducing the carbon footprint of the livestock industry, how effective might they be, and what could be done to encourage their implementation? The livestock industry is responsible for around 14.5 % of global greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of this percentage is due to the emission of large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, which both result in greater global warming than carbon dioxide per gram of gas released. The main cause of livestock methane emissions is the digestive process in ruminants, such as cattle and sheep. In these animals, food is fermented, generating methane which is burped out. Nitrous oxide is generated through the application of fertilisers for animal feed production. This is also the case with crops grown for human consumption, but, as most of the energy stored in crops is lost when they are fed to animals, emissions due to fertilisers are much greater per calorie of animal produce than of plant produce. Both gases are produced by the storage of manure and its application as a fertiliser. In addition, carbon dioxide is emitted through burning fossil fuels for purposes such as fertiliser production, operation of farm machinery and transport of goods.

Religious slaughter of animals in the EU

15-11-2012

Religious texts set down traditional methods of slaughter; simply using a knife to kill the animal. The right to continue using these methods is strongly contested the Jewish and Muslim faiths and animal rights activists who wish animals to be stunned first.

Religious texts set down traditional methods of slaughter; simply using a knife to kill the animal. The right to continue using these methods is strongly contested the Jewish and Muslim faiths and animal rights activists who wish animals to be stunned first.

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