19

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
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Date

Internationalisation of EU research organisations

24-07-2019

International research collaboration is the core of contemporary higher education and science systems. The percentage of internationally co-authored publications globally and across Europe has been on the rise. The aim of the study is to analyse the changing nature of academic knowledge production in EU28 Member States towards its increasing internationalization. A number of policy options concerning the improvement of international research collaboration in the European Union are suggested.

International research collaboration is the core of contemporary higher education and science systems. The percentage of internationally co-authored publications globally and across Europe has been on the rise. The aim of the study is to analyse the changing nature of academic knowledge production in EU28 Member States towards its increasing internationalization. A number of policy options concerning the improvement of international research collaboration in the European Union are suggested.

External author

This study has been written by Professor Marek Kwiek, Director of the Center for Public Policy Studies, UNESCO Chair in Institutional Research and Higher Education Policy at the University of Poznan, Poland

How the General Data Protection Regulation changes the rules for scientific research

24-07-2019

The implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) raises a series of challenges for scientific research, especially regarding research that is dependent on data. This study investigates the promises and challenges associated with the implementation of the GDPR in the scientific domain and examines the adequacy of the GDPR exceptions for scientific research in terms of safeguarding scientific freedom and technological progress.

The implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) raises a series of challenges for scientific research, especially regarding research that is dependent on data. This study investigates the promises and challenges associated with the implementation of the GDPR in the scientific domain and examines the adequacy of the GDPR exceptions for scientific research in terms of safeguarding scientific freedom and technological progress.

External author

DG, EPRS; This study has been conducted by the Health Ethics and Policy Lab, ETH Zurich

European research area (ERA) – Regional and cross-border perspectives

30-04-2019

The ERA is a coordination system for national research infrastructures, and itself constitutes an infrastructure designed to create a single market for science. The main implementing instrument for the ERA is the European Union (EU) framework programme for research and innovation (R&I), currently Horizon 2020, alongside national roadmaps for implementing the common priorities. While the ERA offers a way to improve joint programming for research and innovation activities, interaction between research ...

The ERA is a coordination system for national research infrastructures, and itself constitutes an infrastructure designed to create a single market for science. The main implementing instrument for the ERA is the European Union (EU) framework programme for research and innovation (R&I), currently Horizon 2020, alongside national roadmaps for implementing the common priorities. While the ERA offers a way to improve joint programming for research and innovation activities, interaction between research infrastructures, the use of public-public partnerships between Member States, the application of smart specialisation strategies (S3) and the mobility of researchers, challenges still remain. The Horizon 2020 focus on excellence as the main criterion for receiving funding – a requirement designed to cement the EU's reputation in science and its global competitiveness – has led to a concentration of funding as well as R&I capacities in some countries and regions, while increasing the (innovation) gap between EU-15 and EU-13 countries. Other main challenges include the absence of a clear, shared definition of the ERA concept, the multiplication of instruments, and the non-use of binding legislation for ERA implementation. One way to improve the ERA and to broaden participation and cohesion without undermining the criterion of excellence might be to enhance the interoperability between funding and programmes and to continue working on making the EU state aid rules more R&I-friendly.

Mobile phones and health: Where do we stand?

20-03-2019

Mobile phones are an integral part of everyday life, and it is hard to imagine a world without them. There are nevertheless health concerns, and the debate is ongoing. There is a vast body of research on the potential risks from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields such as those emitted by mobile phones. Yet scientific opinion remains split over the possibility of a link between mobile phone radiation and health problems. The results of research in this area have been interpreted in ...

Mobile phones are an integral part of everyday life, and it is hard to imagine a world without them. There are nevertheless health concerns, and the debate is ongoing. There is a vast body of research on the potential risks from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields such as those emitted by mobile phones. Yet scientific opinion remains split over the possibility of a link between mobile phone radiation and health problems. The results of research in this area have been interpreted in a variety of ways, and studies have been criticised for their methodological flaws, lack of statistical significance, and bias. In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a branch of the World Health Organization, classified radiofrequency electromagnet fields as possibly carcinogenic (cancer-causing) to humans. The European Union defined basic restrictions for limiting exposure to electromagnetic fields in Council Recommendation 1999/519/EC, setting maximum values that should not to be exceeded. Moreover, in view of the scientific uncertainty, the European Environment Agency advises taking a precautionary approach. Two sets of large-scale experimental studies involving laboratory animals, one from the United States National Toxicology Program and another from the Italian Ramazzini Institute, have recently brought the debate to the fore again. Both found varying levels of evidence of certain tumours in some of the animals tested. The results have nevertheless prompted diverging conclusions.

What if all our meat were grown in a lab?

17-01-2018

Laboratory meat is grown from a small number of cells taken from a live animal and placed in a growth medium in a bioreactor where they proliferate independently. If meat cultured in this way became widely available, it could significantly alleviate the environmental problems currently caused by livestock production - such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen pollution of waterways - without requiring humans to alter their consumption patterns. This publication provides an overview of the potential ...

Laboratory meat is grown from a small number of cells taken from a live animal and placed in a growth medium in a bioreactor where they proliferate independently. If meat cultured in this way became widely available, it could significantly alleviate the environmental problems currently caused by livestock production - such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen pollution of waterways - without requiring humans to alter their consumption patterns. This publication provides an overview of the potential impacts of laboratory meat on environment, public health and farming, and makes suggestions for anticipatory policy-making in this area.

What if manmade biological organisms could help treat cancer?

08-09-2017

Synthetic biology is expected to begin to design, construct and develop artificial (i.e. man-made) biological systems that mimic or even go beyond naturally occurring biological systems. Applications of synthetic biology in the healthcare domain hold great promise, but also raise a number of questions. What are the benefits and challenges of this emerging field? What ethical and social issues arise from this engineering approach to biology?

Synthetic biology is expected to begin to design, construct and develop artificial (i.e. man-made) biological systems that mimic or even go beyond naturally occurring biological systems. Applications of synthetic biology in the healthcare domain hold great promise, but also raise a number of questions. What are the benefits and challenges of this emerging field? What ethical and social issues arise from this engineering approach to biology?

The Fight against Cancer Is a Team Sport: The Role of Education and Sport

09-12-2016

This document summarises the presentations and discussions taking place at the workshop organised by Policy Department A on the role of education and sport in the fight against cancer, held at the European Parliament in Brussels in July 2016. The aim of the workshop for the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety was to provide background information and highlight ways in which sport and physical activity can be promoted to help reduce the overall impact of cancer. Firstly the scientific ...

This document summarises the presentations and discussions taking place at the workshop organised by Policy Department A on the role of education and sport in the fight against cancer, held at the European Parliament in Brussels in July 2016. The aim of the workshop for the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety was to provide background information and highlight ways in which sport and physical activity can be promoted to help reduce the overall impact of cancer. Firstly the scientific evidence for the link between physical (in)activity and cancer was presented. Risk reductions were discussed, as well as the risks of inactivity, followed by recommendations on improving activity levels. The evidence so far is strong for colon, breast and endometrial cancers. Secondly the focus was on policy initiatives to fight against cancer through education, sport, and physical activity, with discussions on strategies and actions of the European Commission and the WHO. Finally, presentations were given by organisations set up to promote activity during or after cancer treatments, along with recommendations to prevent cancer.

External author

Alojz PETERLE (MEP, EP), Michael LEITZMANN (University of Regensburg, DE), Margo MOUNTJOY (International Olympic Committee), Yves Le LOSTECQUE (DG EAC, European Commission), Susanna KUGELBERG (World Health Organisation), Wendy YARED (European Cancer Leagues), Jaka JAKOPIČ (Ambassador of Movember Movement, SI), Olivier LAPLANCHE (CAMI, FR) and Petra THALLER (Outdoor against Cancer)

The Paediatric Regulation: Are Children Still Missing Out on Potentially Life-Saving Treatments?

15-09-2015

This report summarises the presentations and discussions of the Workshop on "The Paediatric Regulation: Are children still missing out on potentially life-saving treatments?" held at the European Parliament in Brussels, on Tuesday 16 June 2015. The aim of the workshop was to discuss the main challenges and future perspectives related to the treatment of children in Europe in view of a potential future revision of the Paediatric Regulation. The first part of the workshop discussed the state of play ...

This report summarises the presentations and discussions of the Workshop on "The Paediatric Regulation: Are children still missing out on potentially life-saving treatments?" held at the European Parliament in Brussels, on Tuesday 16 June 2015. The aim of the workshop was to discuss the main challenges and future perspectives related to the treatment of children in Europe in view of a potential future revision of the Paediatric Regulation. The first part of the workshop discussed the state of play of the implementation of the Paediatric Regulation. The European Commission presented an overview of the findings of the 2013 Commission progress report on the Paediatric Regulation highlighting the remaining challenges. Some key problems, such as the difficulty to recruit quickly and to find a sufficient number of children patients to conduct clinical trials, were also presented from the industry perspective. The second part of the workshop focused on practical experiences and policy options for improved medicines for children. Still too often, children die from diseases which could be cured with the right treatments. All participants agreed that the Regulation provides a good basis, but that it needs further improvements and fine-tuning to ensure that children are not missing out on life-saving treatments. This workshop and the respective document were prepared by the Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety.

External author

Olga SOLOMON, Magda CHLEBUS, Karen and Mr Kevin CAPEL and Andrea BIONDI

Focus on: Learning in the 21st Century at the EuroScience Open Forum - ESOF 2014

13-05-2015

EuroScience (ES) is an association established in Europe in 1997 with headquarters in Strasbourg (France). It was created based on the model of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). A non-profit grassroots organisation Euroscience was from the outset an association of individuals open to research professionals, teachers, students, science administrators, policy-makers, etc. and generally to any citizen with vested interested in science, technology or humanities and their ...

EuroScience (ES) is an association established in Europe in 1997 with headquarters in Strasbourg (France). It was created based on the model of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). A non-profit grassroots organisation Euroscience was from the outset an association of individuals open to research professionals, teachers, students, science administrators, policy-makers, etc. and generally to any citizen with vested interested in science, technology or humanities and their links with society. EuroScience represents not only European scientists of all ages, disciplines and nationalities but also from the business sector and public institutions such as universities and research institutes.

Horizon 2020: research and innovation for growth

27-11-2012

Horizon 2020 will be one of the main European Union instruments aimed at achieving an "Innovation Union", one of the Europe 2020 growth goals. It will focus on research outputs and innovation, with the goal of accelerating the commercialisation and diffusion of innovation.

Horizon 2020 will be one of the main European Union instruments aimed at achieving an "Innovation Union", one of the Europe 2020 growth goals. It will focus on research outputs and innovation, with the goal of accelerating the commercialisation and diffusion of innovation.

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