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Policy area
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Date

New EU rules on labelling of tyres

26-06-2020

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The new regulation seeks to increase consumer awareness of the tyre label, and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display ...

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The new regulation seeks to increase consumer awareness of the tyre label, and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display the tyre label in all forms of purchase, including where the tyre is not physically shown in the store and where it is sold online or on a long-distance basis. Whereas the tyre label is currently applicable to passenger and light-duty vehicles, in future it would also apply to heavy-duty vehicles. The new label would include visual information on tyre performance in snow or ice conditions, and could be adjusted by means of delegated acts to include information on mileage, abrasion or re-studded tyres. Tyre labels would be included in the new European Product Database for Energy Labelling before any sale on the EU market. On 13 November 2019, successful trilogue negotiations resulted in a provisional agreement on the content of the new regulation. The legal text was finalised and the new TLR was formally adopted by the Council and Parliament in 2020 and published in the Official Journal of the EU on 5 June 2020. Its provisions become applicable from 1 May 2021.

General safety of vehicles and protection of vulnerable road users

24-01-2020

As part of the third 'Europe on the move' package of measures, on 27 May 2018, the European Commission presented a proposal for a regulation on type-approval requirements for motor vehicles and their trailers, as regards their general safety and the protection of vehicle occupants and vulnerable road users. The regulation is part of the EU's efforts to halve the number of fatal and serious injuries in road crashes between 2020 and 2030. It will introduce a number of advanced vehicle safety features ...

As part of the third 'Europe on the move' package of measures, on 27 May 2018, the European Commission presented a proposal for a regulation on type-approval requirements for motor vehicles and their trailers, as regards their general safety and the protection of vehicle occupants and vulnerable road users. The regulation is part of the EU's efforts to halve the number of fatal and serious injuries in road crashes between 2020 and 2030. It will introduce a number of advanced vehicle safety features that passenger cars, vans, buses and trucks will have to have as standard equipment in order to be sold on the internal market. These include intelligent speed assistance, alcohol interlock installation facilitation, driver drowsiness and attention warning, emergency stop signal, reversing detection and event data recorder. Additional requirements will apply to specific vehicle groups, such as vulnerable road user detection for buses and trucks. The new regulation, adopted by the co-legislators in 2019 and signed on 27 November 2019, will replace three current type-approval regulations as of July 2022: the General Vehicle Safety Regulation, the Pedestrian Protection Regulation and the Hydrogen-powered Motor Vehicles Regulation.

Standards and the digitalisation of EU industry: Economic implications and policy developments

27-03-2019

Industrial production, both globally and in the EU, is undergoing a radical digital transformation. New advanced manufacturing techniques rely primarily on innovative digital technologies, which cannot work in isolation, but are based on connected ecosystems delivering collective technological breakthroughs. All of these new technologies essentially rest on an interconnected 'smart world', where objects, machines, people and the environment are increasingly closely interlinked. The timely and harmonised ...

Industrial production, both globally and in the EU, is undergoing a radical digital transformation. New advanced manufacturing techniques rely primarily on innovative digital technologies, which cannot work in isolation, but are based on connected ecosystems delivering collective technological breakthroughs. All of these new technologies essentially rest on an interconnected 'smart world', where objects, machines, people and the environment are increasingly closely interlinked. The timely and harmonised adoption of technical standards is likely to play a pivotal role in this context. Standards can facilitate the ongoing digitalisation of industry by promoting compatibility and interoperability between products and processes; they can also transfer information between economic agents or machines, while guaranteeing minimum levels of quality and safety. Crucially, standards can also become accelerators of change, by promoting innovation and the uptake of new digital technologies. The EU has long recognised this key role of standards in the overall efforts to remove barriers and unlock the growth potential of the economy. Yet, progress in new technologies around the world is accelerating exponentially, and the development of new standards in the field is increasingly taking place outside Europe. This trend could undermine the EU's future comparative advantage and weaken the competitiveness of European industry in the long term. It therefore calls for a coordinated effort to develop European technology standards that are not only more responsive to policy needs but are also agile, open, more strongly linked to research and innovation, and importantly, better joined up.

Type-approval requirements for the general safety of vehicles

18-09-2018

The European Commission recently issued a legislative proposal to increase the general safety of vehicles. This briefing provides an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the impact assessment accompanying this proposal. The IA provides a thorough problem definition and presents measures to tackle it. However, the link between problem definition and the options could have been more straightforward and the analysis, including numerous simulations and quantifications based on four different ...

The European Commission recently issued a legislative proposal to increase the general safety of vehicles. This briefing provides an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the impact assessment accompanying this proposal. The IA provides a thorough problem definition and presents measures to tackle it. However, the link between problem definition and the options could have been more straightforward and the analysis, including numerous simulations and quantifications based on four different models, could have been more transparent and clear. While the IA focuses on the cost for manufacturers on the one side and the societal benefits of prevented or mitigated casualties on the other, it excludes (or only touches upon briefly) other aspects, such as macroeconomic or indirect impacts and the privacy of data as regards the use of new technologies.

A common EU approach to liability rules and insurance for connected and autonomous vehicles

28-02-2018

This assessment of European added value finds that revision of the EU's current legislative framework is necessary, notably as regards the regulation of civil liability and insurance. Quantitative assessment of added value, at the current stage of technological development, proved difficult and inconclusive. A qualitative analysis, however, provided evidence that action at EU level would (i) promote legal certainty; (ii) reduce the transaction costs for car manufacturers and public administrations ...

This assessment of European added value finds that revision of the EU's current legislative framework is necessary, notably as regards the regulation of civil liability and insurance. Quantitative assessment of added value, at the current stage of technological development, proved difficult and inconclusive. A qualitative analysis, however, provided evidence that action at EU level would (i) promote legal certainty; (ii) reduce the transaction costs for car manufacturers and public administrations arising from differences in national liability rules and systems for the determination and calculation of damages; and (iii) secure effective consumer protection.

General principles of EU industrial policy

01-09-2017

The EU’s industrial policy aims to make European industry more competitive so that it can maintain its role as a driver of sustainable growth and employment in Europe. Various strategies have been adopted in order to ensure better framework conditions for EU industry, the most recent being described in the communication ‘For a European Industrial Renaissance’, of January 2014.

The EU’s industrial policy aims to make European industry more competitive so that it can maintain its role as a driver of sustainable growth and employment in Europe. Various strategies have been adopted in order to ensure better framework conditions for EU industry, the most recent being described in the communication ‘For a European Industrial Renaissance’, of January 2014.

Innovation Policy

01-09-2017

Innovation plays an increasing role in our economy. It provides benefits for citizens as both consumers and workers. It is essential to creating better jobs, building a greener society and improving our quality of life, but also to maintaining EU competitiveness in the global market. Innovation policy is the interface between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and aims to create a conducive framework for bringing ideas to market.

Innovation plays an increasing role in our economy. It provides benefits for citizens as both consumers and workers. It is essential to creating better jobs, building a greener society and improving our quality of life, but also to maintaining EU competitiveness in the global market. Innovation policy is the interface between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and aims to create a conducive framework for bringing ideas to market.