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Policy area
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Date

The Ecodesign Directive (2009/125/EC)

24-11-2017

This European Implementation Assessment (EIA) has been provided to accompany the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety in scrutinising the implementation of the directive establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-related products ('Ecodesign Directive'). The EIA consists of an opening analysis and two briefing papers. The opening analysis, prepared in-house by the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit within EPRS, situates ...

This European Implementation Assessment (EIA) has been provided to accompany the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety in scrutinising the implementation of the directive establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-related products ('Ecodesign Directive'). The EIA consists of an opening analysis and two briefing papers. The opening analysis, prepared in-house by the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit within EPRS, situates the directive in the EU policy context, provides key information on implementation of the directive and presents opinions of selected stakeholders on implementation. The paper contains also short overview of consumers' opinions and behaviour. Input to the assessment was received from CPMC SPRL and from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, both in the form of briefing papers: – the first paper gathers the opinions of EU-level and national stakeholders on successes in, failures of and challenges to the implementation of the directive and the underlying reasons. Experts from seven Member States were interviewed: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the United Kingdom, Poland, Portugal and Finland. These interviews are complemented by a literature review of available studies, reports and position papers; – the second paper is based on three elements. The first part presents an analysis of the Ecodesign Directive, ecodesign working plans and related regulations, the second is based on an analysis of the scientific articles discussing the application of the directive to specific product groups and the third presents the results of the on-line surveys evaluating the application of the regulations of the directive for selected product groups.

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

27-07-2017

In July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. The rescaling of different types of household products would be done ...

In July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. The rescaling of different types of household products would be done through delegated acts from the Commission. While the proposal is supported by consumer and environmental groups, industry groups are concerned that a major change in energy labelling could have a negative impact on both producers and consumers, acting as a disincentive to greater energy efficiency. The Council adopted a general approach in November 2015. The Parliament approved a series of legislative amendments in July 2016. After several trilogue meetings, a provisional agreement was reached in March 2017. The agreed text was subsequently approved by the Parliament on 13 June and by the Council on 26 June 2017. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of February 2017: PE 599.282.

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

07-06-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a regulation on energy labelling that would replace and repeal the 2010 directive on the subject. The Parliament proposed a series of amendments in July 2016, setting the stage for interinstitutional 'trilogue' negotiations. An agreement was eventually reached in March 2017, and the agreed text is due to be voted in the June plenary.

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a regulation on energy labelling that would replace and repeal the 2010 directive on the subject. The Parliament proposed a series of amendments in July 2016, setting the stage for interinstitutional 'trilogue' negotiations. An agreement was eventually reached in March 2017, and the agreed text is due to be voted in the June plenary.

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

15-02-2017

On 15 July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. Detailed legislation on energy labelling of household appliances ...

On 15 July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. Detailed legislation on energy labelling of household appliances would subsequently be adopted in the form of delegated acts. While the proposal is supported by consumer and environmental groups, industry groups are concerned that a major change in energy labelling could have a negative impact on both producers and consumers, acting as a disincentive to greater energy efficiency. The Council adopted a general approach in November 2015. The Parliament approved a set of legislative amendments in July 2016. Several trilogue meetings were held at political and technical level in autumn 2016. Ongoing institutional dialogue to resolve the remaining areas of disagreement may see further trilogue negotiations. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html.

Planned obsolescence: Exploring the issue

02-05-2016

Although no overarching definition of planned obsolescence exists, the term 'planned obsolescence' (of products or technology) is described as the intentional production of goods and services with short economic lives, stimulating consumers to repeat purchases too frequently. The incandescent light bulb with an engineered shorter lifespan (the Phoebus cartel case) is one example from the past of proven planned obsolescence. Data suggest that the median lifespans of certain categories of product have ...

Although no overarching definition of planned obsolescence exists, the term 'planned obsolescence' (of products or technology) is described as the intentional production of goods and services with short economic lives, stimulating consumers to repeat purchases too frequently. The incandescent light bulb with an engineered shorter lifespan (the Phoebus cartel case) is one example from the past of proven planned obsolescence. Data suggest that the median lifespans of certain categories of product have been shortening, and consumer organisations have drawn attention to more recent suspected cases of planned obsolescence in connection with washing machines, inkjet cartridges, electronic devices, etc. One Member State – France – recently introduced a definition of planned obsolescence into its legislation, making it a punishable offence. No specific EU rules mention planned obsolescence, but the subject ties in with EU legislation on ecodesign, waste, use of natural resources, consumer information and the new package from the European Commission on the circular economy. The main consumer concerns and problematic strategies associated with the issue are: design features that do not allow repair, upgradability or interoperability with other devices; the unavailability of spare parts and high repair costs; and marketing strategies pushing consumers to buy new, fashionable products and replace existing ones very quickly. Various ways to curb the practice of planned obsolescence have been proposed, not least a shift towards a culture that values product durability and sustainability.

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

14-03-2016

On 15 July 2015 the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The new regulation would contribute towards meeting the EU target of improving energy efficiency by 27% by 2030. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard ...

On 15 July 2015 the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The new regulation would contribute towards meeting the EU target of improving energy efficiency by 27% by 2030. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. Detailed legislation on energy labelling of household appliances would be adopted as delegated acts. While the proposal is supported by consumer and environmental groups, industry groups are concerned that a major change in energy labelling could have a negative impact on producers and consumers and act as a disincentive to energy efficiency. The Parliament has in the past supported a closed A-G scale on energy labelling as a way to provide a stronger incentive for consumers to buy more efficient products. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of October 2015, PE 568.360. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

How to End Energy Poverty? Scrutiny of Current EU and Member States Instruments

26-10-2015

Policymaking to alleviate energy poverty needs to find a balance between short-term remedies and the resolution of long-term drivers of energy poverty. EU policy might need to work towards a) finding a definition of energy poverty; b) supporting national policies financially through EU coordination; and c) setting minimum standards for energy efficiency of buildings and devices. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE ...

Policymaking to alleviate energy poverty needs to find a balance between short-term remedies and the resolution of long-term drivers of energy poverty. EU policy might need to work towards a) finding a definition of energy poverty; b) supporting national policies financially through EU coordination; and c) setting minimum standards for energy efficiency of buildings and devices. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

External author

Schumacher, Katja (Öko-Institut e.V.), Cludius, Johanna (Öko-Institut e.V.), Förster, Hannah (Öko-Institut e.V.), Greiner, Benjamin (Öko-Institut e.V.), Hünecke, Katja (Öko-Institut e.V.), Kenkmann, Tanja (Öko-Institut e.V.) and van Nuffel, Luc (Trinomics)

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

01-10-2015

On 15 July 2015 the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The new regulation would contribute towards meeting the target set by the October 2014 European Council of improving energy efficiency in the EU by 27% by 2030. The proposed regulation would restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on ...

On 15 July 2015 the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The new regulation would contribute towards meeting the target set by the October 2014 European Council of improving energy efficiency in the EU by 27% by 2030. The proposed regulation would restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. Detailed legislation on energy labelling of household appliances would be adopted as delegated acts. While the proposal is supported by consumer and environmental groups, industry groups are concerned that a major change in energy labelling could have a negative impact on producers and consumers and act as a disincentive to energy efficiency. The Parliament has in the past supported a closed A-G scale on energy labelling as a way to provide a stronger incentive for consumers to buy more efficient products. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html