13

result(s)

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Policy area
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Keyword
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Venezuela: The standoff continues

12-04-2019

Three months since Juan Guaido declared himself interim president of Venezuela and won official recognition from over 50 countries, his standoff with Nicolás Maduro continues, as the Chavista regime steps up its pressure on the opposition. The outcome is uncertain, but some progress has been made on the humanitarian front.

Three months since Juan Guaido declared himself interim president of Venezuela and won official recognition from over 50 countries, his standoff with Nicolás Maduro continues, as the Chavista regime steps up its pressure on the opposition. The outcome is uncertain, but some progress has been made on the humanitarian front.

Copyright in the digital single market

20-03-2019

On 13 February 2019, after more than two years of protracted negotiations, Parliament and Council negotiators reached a provisional agreement on the proposal for an EU directive on copyright. The compromise, approved by the Legal Affairs Committee and by the Council, is due to be voted by Parliament in plenary during March.

On 13 February 2019, after more than two years of protracted negotiations, Parliament and Council negotiators reached a provisional agreement on the proposal for an EU directive on copyright. The compromise, approved by the Legal Affairs Committee and by the Council, is due to be voted by Parliament in plenary during March.

'Fake news' [What Think Tanks are thinking]

14-09-2018

Attempts at influencing or distorting elections in the United States and other countries, including some European Union Member States, have drawn attention to what is commonly referred to as ‘fake news’, or false news posing as factual stories. Although the phenomenon of generating misleading news stories is at least as old as the printing press, the growth of social media has led to a very significant proliferation of this phenomenon. Some outlets use deceitful headlines and content to boost readership ...

Attempts at influencing or distorting elections in the United States and other countries, including some European Union Member States, have drawn attention to what is commonly referred to as ‘fake news’, or false news posing as factual stories. Although the phenomenon of generating misleading news stories is at least as old as the printing press, the growth of social media has led to a very significant proliferation of this phenomenon. Some outlets use deceitful headlines and content to boost readership, in a search for higher advertising revenue. Other sources, often sponsored by certain state actors, are accused of spreading ‘fake news’ for entirely political ends. In March 2018, the European Commission published the Final Report of the High Level Expert Group on Fake News and Online Disinformation, which proposes ways to combat the phenomenon. In April a Commission communication followed, entitled ‘Tackling online disinformation: a European Approach.’

EYE event - Free speech in the digital era

16-05-2018

Are the business models of the big social media companies compatible with the principles of democracy? Can we protect free speech and at the same time ensure that social media companies take more responsibility for the content they spread, including hate speech? Can we turn the challenges into opportunities?

Are the business models of the big social media companies compatible with the principles of democracy? Can we protect free speech and at the same time ensure that social media companies take more responsibility for the content they spread, including hate speech? Can we turn the challenges into opportunities?

Media freedom trends 2017: Eastern Partnership countries

03-05-2017

Media freedom is a core EU value and a cornerstone of democracy. That makes it a key part of the overall set of democratic and legal reforms being implemented by the six Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries. As such, it is high on the agenda in political dialogue between the EU and these former Soviet states. Since the 2015 Eastern Partnership Media Conference highlighted media freedom in the EaP countries and options for EU engagement, international rankings assessing the levels of media freedom ...

Media freedom is a core EU value and a cornerstone of democracy. That makes it a key part of the overall set of democratic and legal reforms being implemented by the six Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries. As such, it is high on the agenda in political dialogue between the EU and these former Soviet states. Since the 2015 Eastern Partnership Media Conference highlighted media freedom in the EaP countries and options for EU engagement, international rankings assessing the levels of media freedom in most EaP countries have seen limited changes. Whereas Ukraine has made progress, despite the on-going crisis in the country, Moldova — former 'poster child' of the international media freedom rankings — has slipped downwards over recent years. In both countries, the Kremlin's increasing information activities present a difficult challenge to media freedom policies. Sustainable changes in media freedom do not happen overnight. Nevertheless, beneath the surface, EU-funded projects and programmes are helping to change the media landscape. The European Parliament (EP) has also been consistent in promoting and supporting press freedom and freedom of expression in the region.

Human Rights in Iran after the Nuclear Deal Business as Usual or Time for Change?

13-03-2017

This report summarises the proceedings of a workshop organised jointly by the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Human Rights (DROI) and the Delegation for relations with Iran (D-IR). The purpose of the workshop was to analyse the most recent developments regarding human rights in Iran since the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) was signed in July 2015 and to explore the options available to the EU in seeking to help improve the situation. Experts and human rights defenders pointed to ...

This report summarises the proceedings of a workshop organised jointly by the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Human Rights (DROI) and the Delegation for relations with Iran (D-IR). The purpose of the workshop was to analyse the most recent developments regarding human rights in Iran since the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) was signed in July 2015 and to explore the options available to the EU in seeking to help improve the situation. Experts and human rights defenders pointed to the gaps between law and practice in Iran and raised continuing concerns about the death penalty, political prisoners, prison conditions, arrests of dual nationals, minority rights and restrictions to internet access. They identified Iran’s dual power structure of elected and non-elected institutions and corruption as some of the chief constraints to any reform efforts. They said the EU should keep human rights — including support for the relevant UN mechanisms and efforts — high on its agenda. They said the key factors for engaging successfully with Iran on human rights in future were clear criteria and benchmarks, detailed knowledge of the human rights issues at stake and interaction with Iranian civil society both inside and outside Iran.

External author

Firouzeh NAHAVANDI (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium - chapter 2.1) ; Nazila GHANEA (University of Oxford, the UK - chapter 2.2) and Giulia BONACQUISTI (Trans European Policy Studies Association - TEPSA, Belgium - workshop report)

Belarus: Human rights situation remains bleak

23-02-2016

Belarus is the only European country where the death penalty is still applied. Opposition politicians have disappeared, the President has stifled all forms of budding protests with violence; and authorities continue to harass human rights activists and independent journalists. Despite the softening in EU-Belarus ties and the newly lifted sanctions, the overall human rights situation under President Lukashenko's autocratic rule has yet to improve.

Belarus is the only European country where the death penalty is still applied. Opposition politicians have disappeared, the President has stifled all forms of budding protests with violence; and authorities continue to harass human rights activists and independent journalists. Despite the softening in EU-Belarus ties and the newly lifted sanctions, the overall human rights situation under President Lukashenko's autocratic rule has yet to improve.

Religious fundamentalism and radicalisation

23-03-2015

The recent terrorist attacks in Europe and the increasing number of European terrorist 'foreign fighters' highlight the need not only to reinforce the policy measures against radicalisation and religious fundamentalism but also to understand the processes of these two phenomena in the European context. Radicalisation is a complex matter that has not been defined uniformly in the social sciences. It can be seen as a phenomenon of people embracing views which could lead to terrorism, and is closely ...

The recent terrorist attacks in Europe and the increasing number of European terrorist 'foreign fighters' highlight the need not only to reinforce the policy measures against radicalisation and religious fundamentalism but also to understand the processes of these two phenomena in the European context. Radicalisation is a complex matter that has not been defined uniformly in the social sciences. It can be seen as a phenomenon of people embracing views which could lead to terrorism, and is closely connected to the notion of extremism. Religious fundamentalism, a belief in an absolute religious ideology with no tolerance for differing interpretations, is a contributing factor to the development of radical opinions. Radicalisation is a dynamic process cutting across social and demographic strata. Recent studies seeking to understand it suggest of the need to profile the processes of recruitment, be it online or in places such as schools, mosques and prisons. The causes of radicalisation are complex, drawing from the continuing conflicts in the Middle East, the disconnectedness of large Muslim communities living in Western societies and their search for identity. The process of recruitment occurs by way of extremist propaganda spread by terrorist organisations with roots abroad, but operating in Europe. Radicalisation is a serious threat to internal security in EU Member States, who retain the main competence in this matter. The measures taken at EU level contribute to the fight against radicalisation by offering common strategies, EU-wide cooperation networks and coordination of Member States' efforts.

Outcome of the informal European Council meeting of 12 February 2015: Post-European Council Briefing

24-02-2015

The informal meeting of the European Council on 12 February generated a statement on anti-terrorism measures, a discussion on improving economic policy in the eurozone following a presentation by Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, an assessment of the result of the Minsk talks in the presence of Ukrainian President Poroshenko, and a report by Eurogroup President Dijsselbloem on Greece. Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank also attended the meeting.  

The informal meeting of the European Council on 12 February generated a statement on anti-terrorism measures, a discussion on improving economic policy in the eurozone following a presentation by Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, an assessment of the result of the Minsk talks in the presence of Ukrainian President Poroshenko, and a report by Eurogroup President Dijsselbloem on Greece. Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank also attended the meeting.  

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND HUMAN RIGHTS

14-06-2010

The rapid evolution of information and communications technology (ICT) and associated digital communications over the past two decades has dramatically changed communication practices across the world. This has had profound implications for human rights on a number of levels. Firstly, communication technologies are presenting new ways to more fully realise our human rights. This is particularly true of the right to freedom of expression. Secondly, ICTs have provided human rights activists with new ...

The rapid evolution of information and communications technology (ICT) and associated digital communications over the past two decades has dramatically changed communication practices across the world. This has had profound implications for human rights on a number of levels. Firstly, communication technologies are presenting new ways to more fully realise our human rights. This is particularly true of the right to freedom of expression. Secondly, ICTs have provided human rights activists with new tools for defending human rights. Internet access via mobile phones gives citizens the power to communicate rights violations in real time to global audiences; social networking tools connect human rights defenders across the world to enhance collaboration and information sharing; censorship circumvention technologies allow people to bypass attempts to monitor and control information and communication flows. However, as well as unleashing tremendous new opportunities for protecting and advancing human rights, digital communications also present a series of serious challenges. These include direct threats to human rights, such as the development of increasingly sophisticated censorship and surveillance mechanisms. They also include deeper, structural problems such as the persistence of digital divides in access to communications infrastructure and capacities along geographical, gender and social lines.

External author

Lisa HORNER, Head of Research and Policy, Global Partners and Associates ; Dixie HAWTIN, Global Partners and Associates ; Andrew PUDDEPHATT, Director, Global Partners and Associates - London, United Kingdom

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