18

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

Anti-money laundering - reinforcing the supervisory and regulatory framework

02-09-2019

On the back of a number of high profile cases and alleged cases of money laundering, this briefing presents current initiatives and actions aiming at reinforcing the anti-money laundering supervisory and regulatory framework in the EU. This briefing first outlines (1) the EU supervisory architecture and the respective roles of European and national authorities in applying anti-money laundering legislation that have been further specified in the 5th AML Directive and (2) ways that have been proposed ...

On the back of a number of high profile cases and alleged cases of money laundering, this briefing presents current initiatives and actions aiming at reinforcing the anti-money laundering supervisory and regulatory framework in the EU. This briefing first outlines (1) the EU supervisory architecture and the respective roles of European and national authorities in applying anti-money laundering legislation that have been further specified in the 5th AML Directive and (2) ways that have been proposed to further improve the anti-money laundering supervisory and regulatory frameworks, including the 12 September 2018 Commission’s communication, the changes to the European Supervisory Authority (ESA) Regulation adopted by the co-legislators on the basis of a Commission proposal and the most recent Commission’s state of play of supervisory and regulatory landscapes on anti-money laundering. Some previous AML cases are presented in Annex. This briefing updates an EGOV briefing originally drafted in April 2018. On a more prospective note, this briefing also presents (3) some possible additional reforms to bring about a more integrated AML supervisory architecture in the EU. In that respect, President-elect U. von der Leyen’s political declaration stresses the need for further action without specifying at this stage possible additional supervisory and regulatory developments: “The complexity and sophistication of our financial system has opened the door to new risks of money laundering and terrorist financing. We need better supervision and a comprehensive policy to prevent loopholes.”

Latvia Cracks Down on Unscrupulous Banking

13-12-2018

This briefing, provided by Policy department A, discusses the Latvian banking system and its exposure to money laundering risks. It was prepared following the European Parliament’s Financial Crimes, Tax Evasion and Tax Avoidance Committee (TAX3) delegation visit to Latvia in August 2018.

This briefing, provided by Policy department A, discusses the Latvian banking system and its exposure to money laundering risks. It was prepared following the European Parliament’s Financial Crimes, Tax Evasion and Tax Avoidance Committee (TAX3) delegation visit to Latvia in August 2018.

Political and Electoral Rights of Non-citizen Residents in Latvia and Estonia: Current Situation and Perspectives

16-05-2018

Persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia (‘respective non-citizen populations’) do not have the right to take part in the elections to the European Parliament. The position of Estonia and Latvia is that their respective non-citizen populations have certain legal links with respective States but that these populations are not their nationals. There are certain differences between persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia, both regarding ...

Persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia (‘respective non-citizen populations’) do not have the right to take part in the elections to the European Parliament. The position of Estonia and Latvia is that their respective non-citizen populations have certain legal links with respective States but that these populations are not their nationals. There are certain differences between persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia, both regarding the formal title of the status and the content of the rights (for example, Estonian non-citizen population can vote in municipal elections). The background to the status of respective non-citizen populations is set by public international law rules on the statehood of Baltic States. The mainstream position is that Baltic States were unlawfully controlled by the Soviet Union until the early 1990s, therefore Soviet-era settlers and their descendants did not have an automatic right to their nationality. There are three ways of conceptualising the legal status of the respective non-citizen populations. The Estonian and Latvian position that they have a special status has been accepted by some States and, by necessary implication, by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights. Some UN human rights institutions characterise these peoples as stateless. The third reading, suggested by certain legal writers, is that respective non-citizen populations are nationals with limited political rights.

External author

Martins Paparinskis

Naturalization and Citizenship in Latvia and Estonia

16-05-2018

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, argues that Latvia and Estonia have introduced legal statuses –non-citizenship in Latvian and undetermined citizenship in Estonia – that are unique in the European Union in that they give their holders a status that is not citizenship but that is not statelessness either suggesting that the statuses give far-reaching rights to ...

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, argues that Latvia and Estonia have introduced legal statuses –non-citizenship in Latvian and undetermined citizenship in Estonia – that are unique in the European Union in that they give their holders a status that is not citizenship but that is not statelessness either suggesting that the statuses give far-reaching rights to their holders while staying short of citizenship. Moreover, the author suggests that debates about the status of non-citizens in Latvia and Aliens in Estonia need to be read against the background of the two states’ history as Soviet republics and political and legal decisions that were taken in the 1990s. She supports that Citizenship has become a very emotional and contested issue in Latvia and Estonia. She goes on to say that Latvia and Estonia bring a key question regarding citizenship to light i.e. the question of the agent of citizenship : who needs to act in issues regarding citizenship and whether it is the state´s task to confer citizenship or is it an individuals’ task to claim it.

External author

Susanne Tonsmann

Democratic Transition and Linguistic Minorities in Estonia and Latvia

16-05-2018

Upon request by the PETI Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned this in-depth analysis on Democratic Transition and Linguistic Minorities in Estonia and Latvia. The writer claims that in order to understand the situation of political representation rights of ethnic and linguistic minorities in Estonia and Latvia it is essential to provide a historical-political framework that contextualizes the presence of such substantial minorities in the ...

Upon request by the PETI Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned this in-depth analysis on Democratic Transition and Linguistic Minorities in Estonia and Latvia. The writer claims that in order to understand the situation of political representation rights of ethnic and linguistic minorities in Estonia and Latvia it is essential to provide a historical-political framework that contextualizes the presence of such substantial minorities in the two countries and justifies the type of relationship existing with the majority of nation holder. He also suggests that from one side, full integration is the goal that needs to be pursued, while at the same time it's important to ensure the cultural and national values of Latvians and Estonians.

External author

Angela DI GREGORIO

THE INSTRUMENTS PROVIDING MACRO-FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO EU MEMBER STATES

12-01-2017

This paper revises the European instruments for macro-financial stability providing financial support to member states. Three instruments, created on an ad-hoc basis during the crisis, are temporary and should gradually disappear. One instrument reserved for non-euro area member states, and others targeted at euro area countries remain in place. In the long term, the European Stability Mechanism is likely to become the only instrument for macro-financial assistance, but its current standing outside ...

This paper revises the European instruments for macro-financial stability providing financial support to member states. Three instruments, created on an ad-hoc basis during the crisis, are temporary and should gradually disappear. One instrument reserved for non-euro area member states, and others targeted at euro area countries remain in place. In the long term, the European Stability Mechanism is likely to become the only instrument for macro-financial assistance, but its current standing outside the EU legal framework needs to be addressed.

External author

Cinzia ALCIDI, David Rinaldi, Jorge Núñez Ferrer, Danel Gros, Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS)

Options of Handling Choke Species in the View of the EU Landing Obligation – The Baltic Plaice Example

15-12-2015

Under current fishing patterns, the Landing Obligation may result in plaice choking some Baltic Sea cod and mixed demersal fisheries. We propose a structured approach (decision tree) to identify solutions to the apparent problems, demonstrating how this problem can largely be mitigated by quota swaps, the use of more selective gear and spatio-temporal avoidance, for which the Landing Obligation will create incentives. As a last resort, short-term solutions are the provisions of flexibilities and ...

Under current fishing patterns, the Landing Obligation may result in plaice choking some Baltic Sea cod and mixed demersal fisheries. We propose a structured approach (decision tree) to identify solutions to the apparent problems, demonstrating how this problem can largely be mitigated by quota swaps, the use of more selective gear and spatio-temporal avoidance, for which the Landing Obligation will create incentives. As a last resort, short-term solutions are the provisions of flexibilities and exemptions in the CFP Basic Regulation.

External author

Christopher ZIMMERMANN, Sarah B. M. KRAAK, Uwe KRUMME, Juan SANTOS, Sven STÖTERA and Lena VON NORDHEIM (Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock)

Adult Education and Open Educational Resources

15-09-2015

This study reviews the current use of Open Educational Resources in Adult Education, assesses its potential and makes recommendations for policy interventions, taking account of the European Commission’s policy frameworks. It incorporates new research on over 12 Member States, leveraging on a synthesis of existing research from a range of projects including POERUP (Policies for OER Uptake) and a 2014-15 study on Shared OER for the Joint Research Centre, augmented by two more recent studies for JRC ...

This study reviews the current use of Open Educational Resources in Adult Education, assesses its potential and makes recommendations for policy interventions, taking account of the European Commission’s policy frameworks. It incorporates new research on over 12 Member States, leveraging on a synthesis of existing research from a range of projects including POERUP (Policies for OER Uptake) and a 2014-15 study on Shared OER for the Joint Research Centre, augmented by two more recent studies for JRC and LLP.

External author

Paul Bacsich, with additional research from Giles Pepler, Sara Frank Bristow, Ebba Ossiannilsson, Alistair Creelman, Eva Szalma and Ilmars Slaidins (Sero Consulting Ltd, the UK)

Gender equality in employment and occupation. European Implementation Assessment

29-05-2015

The principle of equal pay is anchored in the EEC founding Treaty of 1957. Directive 2006/54/EC was a recast of secondary law dating back to 1975 pursuing gender equality in (access to) employment and it ‘consolidated’ case law in this area developed by the European Court of Justice. This European Implementation Assessment is based on input received from four independent groups of experts (included as annexes) on different aspects of the application of the Recast Directive: legal aspects and in ...

The principle of equal pay is anchored in the EEC founding Treaty of 1957. Directive 2006/54/EC was a recast of secondary law dating back to 1975 pursuing gender equality in (access to) employment and it ‘consolidated’ case law in this area developed by the European Court of Justice. This European Implementation Assessment is based on input received from four independent groups of experts (included as annexes) on different aspects of the application of the Recast Directive: legal aspects and in particular direct and indirect discrimination; proper consideration of the role of job evaluation and classification systems; necessary protection of pregnancy and the role of maternity leave and related schemes in view of gender equality at work and for careers. The assessment concludes that there is a very strong case for immediate and vigorous actions at EU level, going beyond voluntary measures, in line with EP resolutions.  

Eastern Partnership after five years [What Think Tanks are thinking]

26-05-2015

The European Union reaffirmed on 22 May its commitment to developing closer political and economic relations with Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine under its Eastern Partnership programme. At a summit in Riga, Latvia, participants said in a declaration they would work together to strengthen democracy, rule of law, human rights and fundamental freedoms. Facing continued confrontation between Russia and Ukraine, the EU confirmed its support to the territorial integrity, independence ...

The European Union reaffirmed on 22 May its commitment to developing closer political and economic relations with Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine under its Eastern Partnership programme. At a summit in Riga, Latvia, participants said in a declaration they would work together to strengthen democracy, rule of law, human rights and fundamental freedoms. Facing continued confrontation between Russia and Ukraine, the EU confirmed its support to the territorial integrity, independence and sovereignty of all its partners. A selection of commentaries and analyses by major international think tanks on Eastern Partnership and its future are listed below, with hyperlinks to the texts concerned:

Upcoming events

13-11-2019
Understanding EU environment policy: State-of-play and future challenges
Other event -
EPRS
20-11-2019
Europe's Future: Where next for EU institutional Reform?
Other event -
EPRS

Partners

Stay connected

email update imageEmail updates system

You can follow anyone or anything linked to the Parliament using the email updates system, which sends updates directly to your mailbox. This includes the latest news about MEPs, committees, the news services or the Think Tank.

You can access the system from any page on the Parliament website. To sign up and receive notifications on Think Tank, simply submit your email address, select the subject you are interested in, indicate how often you want to be informed (daily, weekly or monthly) and confirm the registration by clicking on the link that will be emailed to you.

RSS imageRSS feeds

Follow all news and updates from the European Parliament website by making use of our RSS feed.

Please click on the link below to configure your RSS feed.