748

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Northern Ireland after Brexit

06-05-2020

The United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union ('Brexit'), by referendum in June 2016, raised particular concerns in and about Northern Ireland, which had voted by 56 per cent to remain within the European Union. Principal among these concerns was the prospect of a ‘hard’ border, potentially upsetting the delicate balance between the region's status as part of the United Kingdom and its close relationship with Ireland. There were fears that this in turn could disrupt the peace process and ...

The United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union ('Brexit'), by referendum in June 2016, raised particular concerns in and about Northern Ireland, which had voted by 56 per cent to remain within the European Union. Principal among these concerns was the prospect of a ‘hard’ border, potentially upsetting the delicate balance between the region's status as part of the United Kingdom and its close relationship with Ireland. There were fears that this in turn could disrupt the peace process and the progress made since the 1998 Good Friday/Belfast Agreement. Given the UK's insistence on leaving the EU’s customs union, the question of avoiding a hard border without introducing new divisions between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK was a particular challenge in the withdrawal negotiations. The Withdrawal Agreement eventually adopted in January 2020 envisages that the region will nominally be part of UK customs territory, but retain close ties to the EU customs union and single market regulations on manufactured and agricultural goods, with the aim of enabling unobstructed trade to continue between the two parts of the island of Ireland. Much will depend on the detailed arrangements for implementing the Agreement, to be worked out by a specialised committee of EU and UK representatives, which met for the first time on 30 April 2020. With uncertainty as to how Northern Ireland’s rather ambiguous status under the Withdrawal Agreement will work in practice, trade and investment could see some disruption. Economic effects could also result from migration restrictions – given the large number of EU nationals working in Northern Ireland – and the loss of some EU funding. There are also political implications, with the Brexit process having brought debate on Northern Ireland's status as part of the UK back on to the political agenda.

Thesaurus on Brexit

15-09-2017

This thesaurus is a collection of ECON related articles, papers and studies on the possible withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Recent literature from various sources is categorised, chronologically listed – while keeping the content of previous editions - and briefly summarised. To facilitate the use of this tool and to allow an easy access, certain documents may appear in more than one category. The thesaurus is non-exhaustive and may be updated. This document was provided by Policy Department A ...

This thesaurus is a collection of ECON related articles, papers and studies on the possible withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Recent literature from various sources is categorised, chronologically listed – while keeping the content of previous editions - and briefly summarised. To facilitate the use of this tool and to allow an easy access, certain documents may appear in more than one category. The thesaurus is non-exhaustive and may be updated. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the ECON Committee.

EU and UK citizens' rights after Brexit: An overview

18-06-2020

This EPRS paper analyses the implications of Brexit for the rights of both European Union and United Kingdom citizens and provides an overview of the rights protected by the Withdrawal Agreement, which entered into force on 1 February 2020, as well as of the national measures envisaged by the UK and the EU Member States to give effect to the relevant provisions thereof. As a result of the UK leaving the EU and becoming a third country, UK citizens are no longer EU citizens and they will therefore ...

This EPRS paper analyses the implications of Brexit for the rights of both European Union and United Kingdom citizens and provides an overview of the rights protected by the Withdrawal Agreement, which entered into force on 1 February 2020, as well as of the national measures envisaged by the UK and the EU Member States to give effect to the relevant provisions thereof. As a result of the UK leaving the EU and becoming a third country, UK citizens are no longer EU citizens and they will therefore lose a series of rights based on EU citizenship once the transition period provided for in the agreement expires. Currently, UK and EU citizens may still move to the EU and the UK respectively, under the applicable EU rules. Beyond the end of the transition period, the agreement guarantees the rights of EU and UK citizens who had made use of their freedom of movement rights by the end of 2020.

Research for TRAN Committee - BREXIT: transport and tourism - the consequences of a no-deal scenario

26-09-2018

The study investigates the potential impacts on the EU-27 of a no-deal scenario in the Brexit process, focusing on the transport, postal and tourism sectors. The study analyses both the economic policy and legislative dimension, detailing the practical consequences of such a new status quo. Alternatives to safeguard the EU interests are also discussed in the document and a set of practical recommendations is formulated. A no-deal scenario would seriously hurt both the UK and the EU-27 at least in ...

The study investigates the potential impacts on the EU-27 of a no-deal scenario in the Brexit process, focusing on the transport, postal and tourism sectors. The study analyses both the economic policy and legislative dimension, detailing the practical consequences of such a new status quo. Alternatives to safeguard the EU interests are also discussed in the document and a set of practical recommendations is formulated. A no-deal scenario would seriously hurt both the UK and the EU-27 at least in a short-term perspective, although with different intensity among the Member States.

External author

José Francisco PAPÍ FERRANDO, Raffaele ALFONSI, Sabine LANGER, Miguel TRONCOSO

EU Patent and Brexit

05-11-2019

This In-depth Analysis resumes the possible scenarios concerning several Intellectual Property provisions of EU and international law in the event of a withdrawal of the United Kingdom with or without a proper withdrawal agreement. It tries to clarify the question how Brexit may affect the entry into force of the new European Patent with Unitary effect (EPUE), especially, if the Unified Patent Court Agreement (UPCA) can enter into force, even in case the UK has withdrawn from the EU. What would be ...

This In-depth Analysis resumes the possible scenarios concerning several Intellectual Property provisions of EU and international law in the event of a withdrawal of the United Kingdom with or without a proper withdrawal agreement. It tries to clarify the question how Brexit may affect the entry into force of the new European Patent with Unitary effect (EPUE), especially, if the Unified Patent Court Agreement (UPCA) can enter into force, even in case the UK has withdrawn from the EU. What would be the necessary steps to be taken by the EU in order to ensure the functioning of the future European Unitary patent and in case the UPC Agreement would have to be revised because of Brexit.

Brexit and Horizon Europe

15-01-2019

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop on “Brexit and Horizon Europe”, which was held on 21 November 2018. The effects of Brexit on the Horizon Europe Programme were assessed. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies, at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop on “Brexit and Horizon Europe”, which was held on 21 November 2018. The effects of Brexit on the Horizon Europe Programme were assessed. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies, at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

External author

Chloé DE MEULENAER, Reinhilde VEUGELERS

Research for AGRI Committee - Implications of ‘Brexit’ for the EU agri-food sector and the CAP: budgetary, trade and institutional issues

15-11-2017

This is the reference document of the Workshop on ‘The Implications of ‘Brexit’ for the EU agricultural sector and the CAP’ of 9th November 2017, organised by COMAGRI and the Policy Department B. The purpose of this Workshop was to examine and debate the main budgetary, trade and institutional issues related to the Brexit process at the current state of negotiations. This document is structured in three parts: 1. Possible impact of Brexit on the EU budget and, in particular, CAP funding. 2. EU ...

This is the reference document of the Workshop on ‘The Implications of ‘Brexit’ for the EU agricultural sector and the CAP’ of 9th November 2017, organised by COMAGRI and the Policy Department B. The purpose of this Workshop was to examine and debate the main budgetary, trade and institutional issues related to the Brexit process at the current state of negotiations. This document is structured in three parts: 1. Possible impact of Brexit on the EU budget and, in particular, CAP funding. 2. EU - UK agricultural trade: state of play and possible impacts of Brexit. 3. Possible transitional arrangements related to agriculture in the light of the future EU - UK relationship: institutional issues.

External author

Jörg Haas, Eulalia Rubio, Alan MATTHEWS, Cecilia BELLORA, Charlotte EMLINGER, Jean FOURÉ, Houssein GUIMBARD

The Impact of Brexit on the EU Energy System

23-11-2017

This study provided by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) shows that the energy-system related impact of Brexit on EU citizens and companies will be limited. The EU will be able to complete its market, achieve its climate and energy targets and maintain supply security. It appears likely (although not guaranteed) that the UK will continue to maintain sensible environmental policies and safeguard the rights of EU companies ...

This study provided by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) shows that the energy-system related impact of Brexit on EU citizens and companies will be limited. The EU will be able to complete its market, achieve its climate and energy targets and maintain supply security. It appears likely (although not guaranteed) that the UK will continue to maintain sensible environmental policies and safeguard the rights of EU companies in the UK. However, special attention on the impact of Brexit on the Irish energy system is warranted.

External author

Gustav FREDRIKSSON, Alexander ROTH Simone TAGLIAPIETRA, Georg ZACHMANN

Brexit and Energy Policy - Workshop Proceedings

15-06-2018

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop on “Brexit and Energy Policy”, which was held on 16 May 2018. The impact of Brexit on the EU27 energy systems and the future EU electricity and gas partnership with the UK were assessed. The effects of Brexit on Ireland and the potential impact of the UK's withdrawal from Euratom were also discussed. This document was prepared at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop on “Brexit and Energy Policy”, which was held on 16 May 2018. The impact of Brexit on the EU27 energy systems and the future EU electricity and gas partnership with the UK were assessed. The effects of Brexit on Ireland and the potential impact of the UK's withdrawal from Euratom were also discussed. This document was prepared at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

External author

Gustav FREDRIKSSON, Bruegel Alexander ROTH, Bruegel Simone TAGLIAPIETRA, Bruegel Georg ZACHMANN, Bruegel

Implications of Brexit on EU Financial Services

15-06-2017

This study addresses the implications and economic impact of several scenarios of the UK leaving the EU in relation to financial services, ranging from a ‘hard Brexit’ without any arrangements concerning financial services to the current state of affairs under the terms of a full EU membership. Special focus is put on a peculiar variation of ‘hard Brexit’, which are the third-country regimes in the current EU secondary legal framework that allow partial access to the EU single market based on ‘equivalence ...

This study addresses the implications and economic impact of several scenarios of the UK leaving the EU in relation to financial services, ranging from a ‘hard Brexit’ without any arrangements concerning financial services to the current state of affairs under the terms of a full EU membership. Special focus is put on a peculiar variation of ‘hard Brexit’, which are the third-country regimes in the current EU secondary legal framework that allow partial access to the EU single market based on ‘equivalence’ on the basis of decisions by the European Commission or national authorities. The study presents these regimes and the extent to which they were already used in the past. The economic analysis looks at three variations of ‘hard Brexit’ (one, in which the access to the single market is closed, one with partial access based on equivalence and one, in which the City of London is transformed into an ‘offshore financial centre’) and at the scenario, in which the UK joins the EEA. The economic assessment is based on the current state of affairs in relation to the interwovenness of financial services in the EU28 including a closer look at the importance of UK-based clearing of Euro denominated trades.

External author

European Research Centre for Economic and Financial Governance (EURO-CEFG), Prof. Casper De Vries et al.

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