134

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European framework on ethical aspects of artificial intelligence, robotics and related technologies

28-09-2020

The EU can become a global standard-setter in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) ethics. Common EU legislative action on ethical aspects of AI could boost the internal market and establish an important strategic advantage. While numerous public and private actors around the globe have produced ethical guidelines in this field, there is currently no comprehensive legal framework. The EU can profit from the absence of a competing global governance model and gain full 'first mover' advantages. ...

The EU can become a global standard-setter in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) ethics. Common EU legislative action on ethical aspects of AI could boost the internal market and establish an important strategic advantage. While numerous public and private actors around the globe have produced ethical guidelines in this field, there is currently no comprehensive legal framework. The EU can profit from the absence of a competing global governance model and gain full 'first mover' advantages. Building on the EU's economic and regulatory powers, common EU legislative action has great potential to provide European industry with a competitive edge. Furthermore, EU action can facilitate the adoption of EU standards globally and ensure that the development, uptake and diffusion of AI is based on the values, principles and rights protected in the EU. Those benefits cannot be achieved by actions of individual Member States. Thus, the success and benefits of EU action are contingent on the ability of the EU to take timely, common legislative action and to back this action up with strong democratic oversight, accountability and enforcement. The analyses of this European added value assessment suggest that a common EU framework on ethics has the potential to bring the European Union €294.9 billion in additional GDP and 4.6 million additional jobs by 2030.

Civil liability regime for artificial intelligence

25-09-2020

The findings of this European added value assessment (EAVA) suggest that the revision of the EU civil liability regime for artificial intelligence systems (AI) would likely generate substantial economic and social added value. The current preliminary analysis suggests that by 2030, EU action on liability could generate €54.8 billion in added value for the EU economy by stepping up the level of research and development in AI and in the range of €498.3 billion if other broader impacts, including reductions ...

The findings of this European added value assessment (EAVA) suggest that the revision of the EU civil liability regime for artificial intelligence systems (AI) would likely generate substantial economic and social added value. The current preliminary analysis suggests that by 2030, EU action on liability could generate €54.8 billion in added value for the EU economy by stepping up the level of research and development in AI and in the range of €498.3 billion if other broader impacts, including reductions in accidents, health and environmental impacts and user impacts are also taken into consideration. A clear and coherent EU civil liability regime for AI has the potential to reduce risks and increase safety, decrease legal uncertainty and related legal and litigation costs, and enhance consumer rights and trust. Those elements together could facilitate the faster and arguably safer uptake and diffusion of AI. Member States have not yet adopted specific legislation related to the regulation of liability for AI, with some exceptions related to drones, autonomous vehicles and medical AI applications. Timely action at EU level would therefore reduce regulatory fragmentation and costs for producers of AI while also helping to secure high levels of protection for fundamental and consumer rights in the EU

Shaping a European Child Guarantee

22-09-2020

The briefing presents data on the problem of child poverty in the European Union followed by an overview of policy initiatives by the Commission, the Council and the European Palriament. It concludes with points from the debate in research on how to shape an effective Child Guarantee. The note covers aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The briefing presents data on the problem of child poverty in the European Union followed by an overview of policy initiatives by the Commission, the Council and the European Palriament. It concludes with points from the debate in research on how to shape an effective Child Guarantee. The note covers aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The right to disconnect

09-07-2020

The right to disconnect refers to the right of a worker to be able to disconnect from work-related electronic communications during non-work hours and during holidays.

The right to disconnect refers to the right of a worker to be able to disconnect from work-related electronic communications during non-work hours and during holidays.

Assessing the potential impact of an EU-India trade agreement

01-07-2020

The EU and India are major actors in the international arena and the discussions over a possible Free Trade Agreement has been ongoing for several years. This study analyses the potential effects of an FTA between EU and India in a "Cost of Non Europe" perspective. The results of a quantitative simulation of a potential FTA in goods and services indicate that welfare gains from increased trade for both sides may be between € 8 billion and € 8.5 billion (0.03 % increase with respect to the baseline ...

The EU and India are major actors in the international arena and the discussions over a possible Free Trade Agreement has been ongoing for several years. This study analyses the potential effects of an FTA between EU and India in a "Cost of Non Europe" perspective. The results of a quantitative simulation of a potential FTA in goods and services indicate that welfare gains from increased trade for both sides may be between € 8 billion and € 8.5 billion (0.03 % increase with respect to the baseline for the EU and about 0.3 % for India). Furthermore, a qualitative analysis suggests that potential gains may appear from a coordinated EU action in addressing possible side effects, distributive impacts and externalities (such as inequalities, labour market effects, poverty and development implications, environmental issues) and from increased coordination in the provision of global public goods. By considering these aspects, the Cost of Non-Europe in the field may be larger.

Coronavirus and the cost of non-Europe: An analysis of the economic benefits of common European action

11-05-2020

This EPRS paper focuses on the economic benefits of common action at European level and the risk involved if the current coronavirus crisis and its aftermath were to stall or reverse the process of European integration. It attempts to quantify the losses from: (i) any gradual dismantling of the EU project - where cautious estimates suggest that erosion of the EU single market alone would cost the European economy between 3.0 and 8.7 per cent of its collective GDP (this would be existing 'European ...

This EPRS paper focuses on the economic benefits of common action at European level and the risk involved if the current coronavirus crisis and its aftermath were to stall or reverse the process of European integration. It attempts to quantify the losses from: (i) any gradual dismantling of the EU project - where cautious estimates suggest that erosion of the EU single market alone would cost the European economy between 3.0 and 8.7 per cent of its collective GDP (this would be existing 'European added value' permanently lost); and (ii) a parallel failure to take advantage of the unexploited potential of collective public goods that have yet be achieved (this would be future GDP growth foregone). The latter 'cost of non-Europe' in 50 policy areas was identified by EPRS in 2019 as around 14 per cent of EU GDP by the end of a ten-year running-in period.

Added value of a common EU response to the economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic

17-04-2020

In addition to the tragic loss of human lives, the ongoing novel coronavirus pandemic will have severe consequences for the European economy. Common action at EU level and coordinated long-term strategic action at international level is more necessary than ever before. In particular, in addition to the measures taken after the 2008 economic and financial crisis, a resolute move towards greater common policy action and a deepening of the single market, more strategic autonomy, increased common investment ...

In addition to the tragic loss of human lives, the ongoing novel coronavirus pandemic will have severe consequences for the European economy. Common action at EU level and coordinated long-term strategic action at international level is more necessary than ever before. In particular, in addition to the measures taken after the 2008 economic and financial crisis, a resolute move towards greater common policy action and a deepening of the single market, more strategic autonomy, increased common investment, and a reasonable deepening of risk-sharing within the economic and monetary union (EMU), could help to achieve a rapid, broad based and sustainable recovery. Our simulations, which use growth models based on long-term scenarios to 2035, indicate that the cost of complacency could be substantial. In a pessimistic worst-case scenario, where the policy response is fragmented and where no risk-sharing takes place, potential added value growth would be reduced by 0.8 % in 2035. For 2020 to 2035, this would represent a cumulated €2.9 trillion of added value losses for the EU as a whole compared to the initial baseline. In a more optimistic scenario, we assume a decisive move towards more sustained common action at EU level. As a result, potential added value growth is initially less impacted and the common action boosts long-term growth prospects to levels surpassing the estimates from the baseline scenario. For 2020 to 2035, such a scenario would represent a cumulated gain of €0.5 trillion of added value for the EU as a whole compared to the initial baseline.

Towards a joint European approach on vaccination

08-04-2020

Diseases such as measles and the recent Covid-19 outbreak show the need of a joint European approach and EU actions in the area of vaccination to prevent, reduce and eradicate diseases.

Diseases such as measles and the recent Covid-19 outbreak show the need of a joint European approach and EU actions in the area of vaccination to prevent, reduce and eradicate diseases.

Impact of the Erasmus+ programme

07-04-2020

Erasmus+ is the EU programme in the field of education and training, and highly valued by the Member States, the general public and the stakeholders. The European Added Value is high. The multiplier effect of this investment is EUR 10 (lowest estimation) for each EUR 1 invested within 5 years.

Erasmus+ is the EU programme in the field of education and training, and highly valued by the Member States, the general public and the stakeholders. The European Added Value is high. The multiplier effect of this investment is EUR 10 (lowest estimation) for each EUR 1 invested within 5 years.

External author

Mueller, Klaus

EU-27 support for national short-time work schemes

02-04-2020

The outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic hits all Member States, not all in the same way but the impact can spill over on to those Member States not (yet) so much affected. A common STW for the EU 27 can support/reinsure the existing national STW’s. This scheme would limit severe economic crisis, through its stabilising effect on disposable income. It would strengthen the social dimension of EU 27 and demonstrate European solidarity bringing support directly to the citizens.

The outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic hits all Member States, not all in the same way but the impact can spill over on to those Member States not (yet) so much affected. A common STW for the EU 27 can support/reinsure the existing national STW’s. This scheme would limit severe economic crisis, through its stabilising effect on disposable income. It would strengthen the social dimension of EU 27 and demonstrate European solidarity bringing support directly to the citizens.

External author

Müller, Klaus

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