5

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The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

17-05-2016

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in May 2015.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

19-05-2015

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in November 2013.

EU Readmission Agreements: Facilitating the return of irregular migrants

24-04-2015

EU Readmission Agreements (EURAs) are based on reciprocal obligations and are concluded between the European Union and non-EU countries to facilitate the return of people residing irregularly in a country to their country of origin or to a country of transit. They operate alongside but take precedence over bilateral readmission agreements between individual EU Member States and non-EU countries. They are negotiated in a broader context where partner countries are usually granted visa facilitation ...

EU Readmission Agreements (EURAs) are based on reciprocal obligations and are concluded between the European Union and non-EU countries to facilitate the return of people residing irregularly in a country to their country of origin or to a country of transit. They operate alongside but take precedence over bilateral readmission agreements between individual EU Member States and non-EU countries. They are negotiated in a broader context where partner countries are usually granted visa facilitation and other incentives such as financial support for implementing the agreement or special trade conditions in exchange for readmitting people residing without authorisation in the EU. As such, they are crucial to the EU’s return policy, as defined in the Return Directive (Directive 2008/115/EC). The legal basis for concluding EURAs is Article 79(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). They are negotiated with the partner country on the basis of a negotiating mandate granted by the Council to the Commission. They are then concluded after the European Parliament has given its consent. Once they come into force, their effectiveness can vary significantly from country to country. In the past, the European Parliament (EP) has raised concerns that EURAs do not provide sufficient human-rights safeguards to ensure the protection of returnees at all times. The EURA with Albania (signed in 2005) was the first to reflect the EP's concerns about this insufficient reference to human rights.

Oficina Europea de Apoyo al Asilo (EASO)

30-01-2015

La Oficina Europea de Apoyo al Asilo (EASO) es una agencia de la UE que facilita herramientas para ayudar a los Estados miembros a prepararse para la afluencia de solicitantes de asilo y para aplicar la legislación de la UE correspondiente. También apoya a los Estados miembros que se enfrentan a presiones particulares relacionadas con el asilo.

La Oficina Europea de Apoyo al Asilo (EASO) es una agencia de la UE que facilita herramientas para ayudar a los Estados miembros a prepararse para la afluencia de solicitantes de asilo y para aplicar la legislación de la UE correspondiente. También apoya a los Estados miembros que se enfrentan a presiones particulares relacionadas con el asilo.

Frontex: gestión de las fronteras de Europa

30-01-2015

Frontex es la agencia que se encarga de ayudar a los Estados miembros que hacen frente a fuertes presiones migratorias en la protección de las fronteras exteriores de la UE coordinando el despliegue del equipo y los agentes de la guardia de fronteras puestos a disposición por los Estados miembros. Estos últimos años, Frontex ha gestionado varias operaciones en las aguas costeras de Grecia, Italia y España, así como en las fronteras terrestres orientales de la UE. Dada la incesante afluencia de migrantes ...

Frontex es la agencia que se encarga de ayudar a los Estados miembros que hacen frente a fuertes presiones migratorias en la protección de las fronteras exteriores de la UE coordinando el despliegue del equipo y los agentes de la guardia de fronteras puestos a disposición por los Estados miembros. Estos últimos años, Frontex ha gestionado varias operaciones en las aguas costeras de Grecia, Italia y España, así como en las fronteras terrestres orientales de la UE. Dada la incesante afluencia de migrantes que intentan entrar en la UE mediante rutas y procedimientos cada vez más variados, son muchos los expertos que hacen hincapié en lo limitado de los recursos de los que dispone Frontex y piden a la UE y a los Estados miembros que aumenten sus contribuciones a la Agencia.

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