7

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Standard Essential Patents and the Internet of Things

15-01-2019

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, assesses the European Commission of (EC) Communication of 29 November 2017 on the EU approach to Standard Essential Patents. The report examines the principles identified in the Communication with respect to the Commission’s proposals on (i) increasing transparency on SEPs; (ii) determining valuation of SEPs( Standard Essential Patents ...

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, assesses the European Commission of (EC) Communication of 29 November 2017 on the EU approach to Standard Essential Patents. The report examines the principles identified in the Communication with respect to the Commission’s proposals on (i) increasing transparency on SEPs; (ii) determining valuation of SEPs( Standard Essential Patents) and FRAND ( Fair, Reasonable, and Non-Discriminatory) terms; and (iii) enforcement. The report evaluates the efficient resolution of licensing disputes over FRAND, including via litigation, arbitration and mediation, licensing pools and collective licensing. The current document also puts forward some policy recommendations to, inter alia, enhance the general environment of FRAND licencing in the context of SEPs.

Autor externo

Dr Luke MCDONAGH Dr Enrico BONADIO

European high-performance computing joint undertaking

29-06-2018

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026, and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes as well as ...

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026, and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes as well as an equivalent contribution from the participating countries. The joint undertaking would be charged with the joint procurement of two pre-exascale supercomputers for the Union. It would also implement an HPC research and innovation programme to support the European HPC ecosystem in developing technologies to reach exascale performance by 2022-2023. Within the European Parliament, the Industry Committee adopted its report on 19 June 2018. It is expected that Parliament will adopt its opinion during the July 2018 plenary session. Second edition, based on an original briefing by Vincent Reillon. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

¿Debemos temer a la inteligencia artificial?

26-03-2018

Para bien o para mal, se prevé que la inteligencia artificial (IA) tendrá una enorme repercusión en el futuro de la humanidad. A medida que llegan nuevas promesas y preocupaciones a un público cada vez más amplio, el debate está empezando a captar la imaginación pública. En esta publicación, presentamos cuatro artículos de opinión, cada uno de los cuales responde a la pregunta ¿debemos temer a la IA? Los cuatro autores provienen de distintos ámbitos disciplinarios y presentan perspectivas divergentes ...

Para bien o para mal, se prevé que la inteligencia artificial (IA) tendrá una enorme repercusión en el futuro de la humanidad. A medida que llegan nuevas promesas y preocupaciones a un público cada vez más amplio, el debate está empezando a captar la imaginación pública. En esta publicación, presentamos cuatro artículos de opinión, cada uno de los cuales responde a la pregunta ¿debemos temer a la IA? Los cuatro autores provienen de distintos ámbitos disciplinarios y presentan perspectivas divergentes sobre si debemos temer el futuro de la IA y cómo deberíamos proceder con su desarrollo. Los avances en la inteligencia artificial han inspirado formidables esperanzas y temores, muchos de ellos apenas fundamentados en la realidad. Esta magnífica recopilación, de verdaderos expertos, aplica la racionalidad y el análisis a esta esfera emocional y es indispensable para cualquiera que quiera entender uno de los temas más importantes de nuestro día. Steven Pinker Johnstone, Catedrático de Psicología en la Universidad de Harvard y autor de Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress.

Autor externo

EPRS, DG

A renewed industrial policy strategy

09-11-2017

EU industry seems to be on a solid path to recovery from the crisis, with growth in both employment and value added. Industry creates jobs across the economy and is responsible for the bulk of investment in private research and development. In the same way as in other developed parts of the world, European industry is undergoing a transformation based not least on increased convergence between traditional industries and the digital sector. This change is bringing both opportunities and challenges ...

EU industry seems to be on a solid path to recovery from the crisis, with growth in both employment and value added. Industry creates jobs across the economy and is responsible for the bulk of investment in private research and development. In the same way as in other developed parts of the world, European industry is undergoing a transformation based not least on increased convergence between traditional industries and the digital sector. This change is bringing both opportunities and challenges. In order to maintain the global competitiveness of European industry, many current shortcomings, such as insufficient investment levels, widening productivity and innovation gaps, and skills shortages, must be addressed. Many of these issues have been emphasised before: in the aftermath of the recent crisis the EU sought to boost the reindustrialisation of Europe in order to stimulate jobs and growth. The European Commission under Jean-Claude Juncker has made this one of its top priorities and, after a series of related initiatives such as the investment plan and the circular economy package, in September 2017 it announced a renewed industrial policy strategy. This strategy takes a holistic approach, combining both existing and new horizontal and sector-specific initiatives, and sets out actions to be launched by early 2018. The newly proposed initiatives concern cybersecurity, free flow of non-personal data, trade and foreign investment, raw materials and public procurement. Upcoming proposals will concern the circular economy, the intellectual property rights framework, sustainable finance, mobility and skills. The reaction from stakeholders has been mixed: while many have welcomed the strategy in general, particularly its holistic approach and the involvement of multiple stakeholders, others have criticised it as lacking clear new objectives and actions and a long-term vision.

Developing supercomputers in Europe

24-10-2017

A number of companies, universities and start-ups are racing to develop the fastest supercomputer in global rankings. So far China, Switzerland and the USA occupy the top four places in this regard, while the EU does not feature in the top 10. To address the situation, the European Commission has launched, as part of its European cloud strategy, a target plan to acquire and develop European high-performance computers that would rank among the world's top three by 2022. This would allow European science ...

A number of companies, universities and start-ups are racing to develop the fastest supercomputer in global rankings. So far China, Switzerland and the USA occupy the top four places in this regard, while the EU does not feature in the top 10. To address the situation, the European Commission has launched, as part of its European cloud strategy, a target plan to acquire and develop European high-performance computers that would rank among the world's top three by 2022. This would allow European science and technology actors to regain competitive advantage. Supercomputers are increasingly needed to exploit big data and facilitate scientific discoveries that need large computational efforts, such as materials science, artificial intelligence technologies, climate modeling and cryptography. As no single EU Member State has the capacity to develop this on its own, the Commission aims to launch an initiative on the scale of Airbus and, more recently, Galileo, to develop a European data-infrastructure ecosystem in high-performance computing. This has been set as a target in the European digital single market mid-term review, and it has also been established as a goal in the EuroHPC Declaration, which was signed during the first half of 2017 by nine Member States and more are expected. In addition, the Commission has an ambitious €1 billion flagship initiative on quantum technology in place, which will also contribute to the development of quantum supercomputers in the longer term. Expected to surpass traditional supercomputers, the new ones could dramatically improve the technology used in communication, computing and sensing, as well as and in other areas.

Digitising Industry (Industry 4.0) and Cybersecurity

18-10-2017

The digitalisation of manufacturing industry, i.e. employing in depth digital technologies for the performance of good production raises additional cybersecurity questions. Currently EU cybersecurity policies are mainly targeting network security and large infrastructures of public interest, with little emphasis on the needs of a digitised industry. Still, recent policy developments do provide framework of possibly covering these needs.

The digitalisation of manufacturing industry, i.e. employing in depth digital technologies for the performance of good production raises additional cybersecurity questions. Currently EU cybersecurity policies are mainly targeting network security and large infrastructures of public interest, with little emphasis on the needs of a digitised industry. Still, recent policy developments do provide framework of possibly covering these needs.

Bioinformatics - A Technology Assessment of Recent Developments in Bioinformatics and Related Areas of Research and Development Including Highthroughput Screening and Combinatorial Chemistry

01-05-1999

In recent years, new gene science has become probably the most information and automation intensive activity in modern research and clinical innovation. In particular, gene sequence and functional analysis is now fundamentally dependent upon the global production, circulation and consumption of huge amounts of data. The exchanges between computational and biological sciences are both far reaching and reciprocal. On the one hand, masses of genetic information are being translated from their ‘wet platform ...

In recent years, new gene science has become probably the most information and automation intensive activity in modern research and clinical innovation. In particular, gene sequence and functional analysis is now fundamentally dependent upon the global production, circulation and consumption of huge amounts of data. The exchanges between computational and biological sciences are both far reaching and reciprocal. On the one hand, masses of genetic information are being translated from their ‘wet platform’ onto the ‘dry platforms’ of silicon based databases. On the other hand, silicon is now becoming the basis for conducting ‘wet’ biological and chemical research using genechips and labchips. However, the interfaces between life science research, clinical innovation and computational science are fraught with problems for policy makers. For example, with what consequences does genetic data become property; how is data-access controlled and distributed; who will benefit and who will be excluded from potential dividends; how will Europe’s life sciences adapt to the rising access costs to modern biological innovation; how might it be possible to create seamless integration across Europe’s bioinformatic resources; what are the difficulties in bringing biological and computational skills together in innovative combinations; how will the Parliament prepare for new therapeutic and diagnostic innovations; how will quality and safety be maintained? All of these questions are addressed in this report beginning with a brief introduction to new developments in bioinformatics and the key actors involved. Section Two discusses some of the main technical, organisational and market barriers which inhibit actors from fully exploiting opportunities in the area. Section Three offers an assessment of the likely impact of bioinformatic-related technologies on healthcare. These impacts are then discussed in the context of nonclinical sectors like financial and forensic s

Autor externo

Nik Brown, Annemiek Nelis, Brian Rappert and Andrew Webster (Science and Technology Studies Unit - SATSU, Anglia, Polytechnic University, Cambridge, United Kingdom) ; J. B. van Ommen (Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands)

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