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Recovery plan for Europe: State of play, September 2021

14-09-2021

Since the beginning of 2021, Member States and EU institutions have been preparing intensively to launch the recovery instrument, Next Generation EU (NGEU). In order to make this unique financial stimulus package fully operational, many conditions have needed to be met and preparatory steps completed. First, preparations have been ongoing for the spending of the biggest part of NGEU (90 %) under the Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF). This process includes the drawing up of national recovery ...

Since the beginning of 2021, Member States and EU institutions have been preparing intensively to launch the recovery instrument, Next Generation EU (NGEU). In order to make this unique financial stimulus package fully operational, many conditions have needed to be met and preparatory steps completed. First, preparations have been ongoing for the spending of the biggest part of NGEU (90 %) under the Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF). This process includes the drawing up of national recovery and resilience plans by the Member States, their evaluation by the European Commission, and approval by the Council of the EU. Up to 15 September 2021, most of the national plans submitted have been positively assessed by the Commission and approved by the Council (18). Based on this, the Commission concluded agreements with those Member States on a legal commitment authorising the financial contribution to be made, and the first transfers of EU aid (pre-financing) were made on 3 August. In the case of some countries, however, the assessment procedure has been delayed. In parallel, the system for financing NGEU had to be created almost from scratch. It is based on borrowing operations carried out by the European Commission on behalf of the European Union. These operations could start only once all Member States had ratified the Own Resources Decision (ORD), which was done by the end of May 2021. In the meantime, the Commission was preparing for its role of borrower on an unprecedented scale. At the beginning of the summer, it started implementing its diversified funding strategy for the financing of NGEU. In three issuances successfully conducted so far, the Commission has raised €45 billion in total out of the €80 billion planned for 2021. This is an update of a Briefing of 7 June 2021.

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - September 2021

09-09-2021

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Presupuesto rectificativo n.° 1/2021: Reserva de Adaptación al Brexit

08-09-2021

El proyecto de presupuesto rectificativo n.º 1/2021 (PPR n.º 1/2021) al presupuesto general de la Unión Europea de 2021, modificado por el Consejo, tiene por objeto consignar cerca de 1 698 millones EUR a precios corrientes en el presupuesto anual de la Unión para 2021, tanto en créditos de compromiso como de pago. El objetivo del PPR n.º 1/2021 es cubrir las necesidades de prefinanciación resultantes de la aplicación de la Reserva de Adaptación al Brexit (RAB) en 2021. La nueva RAB tiene como objetivo ...

El proyecto de presupuesto rectificativo n.º 1/2021 (PPR n.º 1/2021) al presupuesto general de la Unión Europea de 2021, modificado por el Consejo, tiene por objeto consignar cerca de 1 698 millones EUR a precios corrientes en el presupuesto anual de la Unión para 2021, tanto en créditos de compromiso como de pago. El objetivo del PPR n.º 1/2021 es cubrir las necesidades de prefinanciación resultantes de la aplicación de la Reserva de Adaptación al Brexit (RAB) en 2021. La nueva RAB tiene como objetivo contrarrestar las consecuencias negativas en los Estados miembros de la UE y los sectores más afectados por la retirada del Reino Unido de la UE. Las negociaciones sobre el Reglamento sobre la RAB se han llevado a cabo en paralelo. Se espera que el Parlamento Europeo vote la posición del Consejo sobre el PPR n.º 1/2021 en su sesión plenaria de septiembre, cuando también someterá a votación el propio Reglamento.

The Impact of Organised Crime on the EU’s Financial Interests

31-07-2021

This analytical study, requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Budgetary Control, examines the impact of organised crime on EU’s finances. Taking together the expenditure and revenue sides, the research suggests that between 1% and 2% of the EU budget is defrauded each year. The study also assesses measures at the EU and Member State levels to combat the problem, and recommends actions to help reinforce these measures.

This analytical study, requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Budgetary Control, examines the impact of organised crime on EU’s finances. Taking together the expenditure and revenue sides, the research suggests that between 1% and 2% of the EU budget is defrauded each year. The study also assesses measures at the EU and Member State levels to combat the problem, and recommends actions to help reinforce these measures.

Autor externo

Jack MALAN, Ivan BOSCH CHEN et al. (CSES)

Budgetary control of the Sustainable Development Goals in the EU budget

27-07-2021

As of July 2021, only very limited conclusions can be drawn about the performance of EU policies and programmes towards the Sustainable Development Goals. With only nine years left until 2030, this raises the question as to whether the EU budget is used efficiently via the many spending programmes. This briefing explores what kind of measures are in place to ensure that the implementation of the EU budget contributes effectively to the SDGs at both the EU- and Member States level.

As of July 2021, only very limited conclusions can be drawn about the performance of EU policies and programmes towards the Sustainable Development Goals. With only nine years left until 2030, this raises the question as to whether the EU budget is used efficiently via the many spending programmes. This briefing explores what kind of measures are in place to ensure that the implementation of the EU budget contributes effectively to the SDGs at both the EU- and Member States level.

National budgets and the European Union budget since 2007

16-07-2021

National budgets are a competence of the national governments of the Member States. However, EU countries adopting the euro have to meet specific conditions designed to ensure economic convergence, known as the convergence criteria or Maastricht criteria (agreed by the Member States in the Maastricht Treaty of 1992). They include conditions on sound and sustainable public finances, along with the macroeconomic indicators - price stability, durability of convergence, and exchange rate stability.

National budgets are a competence of the national governments of the Member States. However, EU countries adopting the euro have to meet specific conditions designed to ensure economic convergence, known as the convergence criteria or Maastricht criteria (agreed by the Member States in the Maastricht Treaty of 1992). They include conditions on sound and sustainable public finances, along with the macroeconomic indicators - price stability, durability of convergence, and exchange rate stability.

Brexit Adjustment Reserve

15-07-2021

As part of the preparations for the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, the European Council agreed in July 2020 to create a Brexit adjustment reserve within the special instruments outside the budget ceilings of the European Union's multiannual financial framework, with a budget of €5 billion to counter unforeseen and adverse consequences in Member States and sectors that are most affected. The Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the Brexit adjustment reserve on 25 ...

As part of the preparations for the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, the European Council agreed in July 2020 to create a Brexit adjustment reserve within the special instruments outside the budget ceilings of the European Union's multiannual financial framework, with a budget of €5 billion to counter unforeseen and adverse consequences in Member States and sectors that are most affected. The Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the Brexit adjustment reserve on 25 December 2020. The reserve will support public expenditure incurred by Member States from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2023 for eligible measures, which include support for affected sectors, training, and new border facilities. Funding will be available for all Member States, distributed in several allocation tranches, with 80 % of the resources due to be allocated to Member States in the form of pre-financing, to be disbursed in 2021, 2022 and 2023, and the remainder to be made available in 2025, where applicable. Each country's allocation is calculated based on the importance of its trade with the UK and, where applicable, its dependence on fisheries in UK waters and the size of the population of maritime border regions with the UK. In the European Parliament, the file was assigned to the Committee on Regional Development, which adopted its report on 25 May 2021. A final political trilogue meeting took place on 17 June 2021, confirming the political agreement reached between the Council and Parliament. That agreement now needs to be formally adopted in plenary, expected in September 2021, and then by the Council. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The Sustainable Development Goals in the EU budget

15-07-2021

This briefing will present an overview of the implementation of the SDGs in the EU long-term budget.

This briefing will present an overview of the implementation of the SDGs in the EU long-term budget.

The financial management of visitor groups to the national parliaments

08-07-2021

In most Member States, visitor’ groups are not sponsored to visit the national parliament. A visit to the national parliament is free of charge, and all the costs related to the visit, for example travel costs, accommodation and local minor expenses, need to be paid by the visitors themselves. Germany is the only country which has various kinds of programmes where visitors can be reimbursed. Members of Parliament can invite up to 200 people a year of which the travel costs are partially covered by ...

In most Member States, visitor’ groups are not sponsored to visit the national parliament. A visit to the national parliament is free of charge, and all the costs related to the visit, for example travel costs, accommodation and local minor expenses, need to be paid by the visitors themselves. Germany is the only country which has various kinds of programmes where visitors can be reimbursed. Members of Parliament can invite up to 200 people a year of which the travel costs are partially covered by the German Bundestag. There is also a programme which consists of more days for which all the costs related to travel and accommodation are covered by the German government. The German Bundesrat has a programme in which the 16 federal states can invite people for a visit of multiple days to Berlin. In this case the travel costs and accommodation are paid for by the Bundesrat. For all reimbursements, the rules apply that the receipts and underlying documents need to be provided to the Bundestag and Bundesrat after the visit. All documents and receipts are checked through an ex-post control. The United Kingdom has a programme in which costs are reimbursed, and this programme is funded by the commercial tours of the parliament. In this case, it can be MPs, Peers or the House of Commons or Lords who can invite visitors who are eligible for reimbursement. In Hungary, only schools can get reimbursement for their travel costs and the entry fee for the national parliament. All the receipts need to be provided to the visitor service of the parliament. Some countries do have other schemes in which they provide coverage for schools or costs are covered by the MPs’ own funds. The Council of the EU does not sponsor visitor groups. All visits are requested by visitors themselves and they need to cover all the costs related to the visit themselves. The questions were also sent to the European Commission but no answer was received.

The Impact of Organised Crime on the EU’s Financial Interests

07-07-2021

The research, which focused on a sample of 14 EU Member States (BG, CZ, ES, FR, FI, DE, GR, HU, IT, LU, LV, MT, SE and SK), involved a combination of desk-research, interviews and quantitative modelling. The study considered the impact of organised crime on EU expenditure (e.g. Cohesion Funds) as well EU revenues (e.g. VAT own resources).

The research, which focused on a sample of 14 EU Member States (BG, CZ, ES, FR, FI, DE, GR, HU, IT, LU, LV, MT, SE and SK), involved a combination of desk-research, interviews and quantitative modelling. The study considered the impact of organised crime on EU expenditure (e.g. Cohesion Funds) as well EU revenues (e.g. VAT own resources).

Autor externo

Jack MALAN et al., CSES

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