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Pilot projects and preparatory actions in the annual EU budgetary procedure

19-07-2019

Pilot projects and preparatory actions (PP/PAs) are tools introduced in the European Union (EU) budget that aim at testing new policy initiatives and/or preparing the ground for the adoption of future measures. Such PP/PAs give Members of the European Parliament the possibility to initiate innovative policies and fund them in advance of a legal basis being set. Both new PP/PAs and those continued from previous years must be included in the EU budget through the annual budgetary procedure.

Pilot projects and preparatory actions (PP/PAs) are tools introduced in the European Union (EU) budget that aim at testing new policy initiatives and/or preparing the ground for the adoption of future measures. Such PP/PAs give Members of the European Parliament the possibility to initiate innovative policies and fund them in advance of a legal basis being set. Both new PP/PAs and those continued from previous years must be included in the EU budget through the annual budgetary procedure.

Annual EU budgetary procedure: An introduction to the steps in the EP

19-07-2019

The European Parliament (EP) and the Council are the budgetary authority of the European Union. The two institutions, assisted by the European Commission, decide on the budget in the annual EU budgetary procedure. The annual EU budget funds EU policies and programmes following the Union's political priorities and legal obligations. The financial year starts on 1 January and ends on 31 December. The European Parliament amends the Council position through the work of its Committee on Budgets (BUDG) ...

The European Parliament (EP) and the Council are the budgetary authority of the European Union. The two institutions, assisted by the European Commission, decide on the budget in the annual EU budgetary procedure. The annual EU budget funds EU policies and programmes following the Union's political priorities and legal obligations. The financial year starts on 1 January and ends on 31 December. The European Parliament amends the Council position through the work of its Committee on Budgets (BUDG) and the specialised parliamentary committees. The EP then adopts the Parliament's reading in plenary session. This briefing presents possible scenarios set in the EU Treaties for adoption or non-adoption of the annual budget. It explains differences between the Treaty calendar and the 'pragmatic calendar'. The key actors in establishing the Parliament's position are: the Committee on Budgets and EP specialised committees, in particular the BUDG chair, the annual budget rapporteurs and their shadows, BUDG coordinators and budget rapporteurs in specialised committees. An amendment to the Council's position is a tool enabling Members of the European Parliament to modify the annual budget draft. This briefing sketches the life cycle of such an amendment. The European Parliament and the Council work out an agreement on the annual budget through negotiations consisting of trilogue meetings and conciliation. Last but not least, this briefing explains what happens if there is no agreement on the EU annual budget.

Follow up to the 2009 and 2014 Studies on the Code of Conduct for Commissioners - Improving Effectiveness and Efficiency

15-07-2019

The European Parliament is very attentive to the issue of transparency and integrity within the EU institutions. In the past, the EP has commissioned two studies to verify the level of effectiveness and efficiency of the Code of Conduct for Commissioners of the European Commission. This in-depth analysis verifies whether the Code of Conduct of 2018 complies with the requests the EP has made in order to guarantee the best performance in terms of transparency and integrity by the EC Commissioners. ...

The European Parliament is very attentive to the issue of transparency and integrity within the EU institutions. In the past, the EP has commissioned two studies to verify the level of effectiveness and efficiency of the Code of Conduct for Commissioners of the European Commission. This in-depth analysis verifies whether the Code of Conduct of 2018 complies with the requests the EP has made in order to guarantee the best performance in terms of transparency and integrity by the EC Commissioners. Most of the EP requests have been satisfied. However, there is still some room for improvement in terms of transparency of the Independent Ethical Committee, the cooling off period for Commissioners and provisions related to the role of the European Ombudsman within the Code. Moreover, the Code of Conduct, being a soft law instrument, could be upgraded to a hard law instrument having a stronger binding force. Finally, the EP could reiterate the study recommendations concerning stricter provisions on the involvement of Commissioners in the national, regional or local politics. ince the entry into force of the Financial Perspectives of 2007-2013 one decade ago, the EU’s budget has undergone significant change. In 2009, the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) agreed at Lisbon came into effect. This significantly modified the powers of the European Union’s institutions. The eruption of the global financial crisis in 2008, followed by the crisis particular to the euro area, led to pressure for austerity in the EU’s Member States and put pressure on the EU’s budget itself. This briefing provides a summary of these developments.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Future financing of EU policies

28-06-2019

The principle of subsidiarity means that the European Union (EU) should act where it can do so more effectively than its constituent Member States individually, and this also holds true in the area of public finance – the EU's budget together with off-budget tools for financing EU policies. At €165.8 billion in 2019 – or approximately 1 % of Member States' collective gross national income (GNI) – the EU budget is a great deal smaller in relative terms than EU national governments' budgets. It serves ...

The principle of subsidiarity means that the European Union (EU) should act where it can do so more effectively than its constituent Member States individually, and this also holds true in the area of public finance – the EU's budget together with off-budget tools for financing EU policies. At €165.8 billion in 2019 – or approximately 1 % of Member States' collective gross national income (GNI) – the EU budget is a great deal smaller in relative terms than EU national governments' budgets. It serves mainly as a vehicle for investment, particularly in the areas of rural and regional development, industrial research and support for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and political and economic development in neighbouring countries. These policies are designed to yield European public goods, with benefits that go beyond the national borders of individual EU countries. The Commission calculates that they do so for less than the cost of one cup of coffee a day per citizen. During the 2014-2019 parliamentary term, the EU was buffeted by challenges to its capacity to act, including financially, by geopolitical instability in the wider region, the migration and refugee crisis, and unresolved questions about the future of the euro, linked to the legacy of the economic, financial and sovereign debt crises. However, the EU also saw several notable achievements. These include the update to the financial rules governing the use of EU funds, simplifying the rules and strengthening the focus on performance and results; the creation of a European Public Prosecutor's Office to help address the roughly 0.35 % of the EU budget at risk of fraud; a mid-term revision of the multiannual financial framework (MFF), enhancing its flexibility to provide for a more responsive EU; the development of proposals for new sources of revenue in time for negotiations on the post-2020 MFF; and policy innovation in the field of financial engineering, helping EU finance go further by leveraging private investment. The 2019 elections mark a turning point in the future financing of EU policies, since the new Parliament will be responsible for concluding negotiations on the next multiannual spending plan. The Commission has proposed a 2021-2027 MFF totalling 1.11 % of the post-Brexit EU-27's GNI, and new sources of EU revenue to reduce the burden on national treasuries and forge a clearer link between revenue and policies. It also proposes to consolidate progress made in the last term with regard to budgetary flexibility, financial integrity and the rule of law, and in encouraging private investment in Europe. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued prior to the 2019 European elections.

Multiannual financial framework for the years 2021 to 2027: The future of EU finances

28-06-2019

On 20 June 2019, the European Council examined the progress of work in the Council on the Commission proposal for the long-term design of the post-2020 EU budget. The European Council now aims to reach an agreement among Heads of State or Government before the end of 2019. Elements for consideration in the draft regulation, which is part of a broader package of proposals, include the following features of the new multiannual financial framework (MFF): total resources, structure, priorities, flexibility ...

On 20 June 2019, the European Council examined the progress of work in the Council on the Commission proposal for the long-term design of the post-2020 EU budget. The European Council now aims to reach an agreement among Heads of State or Government before the end of 2019. Elements for consideration in the draft regulation, which is part of a broader package of proposals, include the following features of the new multiannual financial framework (MFF): total resources, structure, priorities, flexibility provisions, and revision clauses. The European Parliament has already detailed its negotiating position in November 2018, with a view to contributing to a smooth transition to the next MFF and its related EU spending programmes as of 2021.

Outlook for the European Council and Euro Summit meetings, 20-21 June 2019

19-06-2019

The June 2019 European Council will discuss, and potentially agree on, high-level appointments to EU institutions and adopt the 2019-2024 strategic agenda. Other agenda topics are the next Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), the EU’s common climate ambition, disinformation, enlargement and foreign policy issues, including relations with Russia. EU-27 leaders will meet for a Euro Summit in extended format to discuss the report submitted by the Eurogroup on EMU reforms.

The June 2019 European Council will discuss, and potentially agree on, high-level appointments to EU institutions and adopt the 2019-2024 strategic agenda. Other agenda topics are the next Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), the EU’s common climate ambition, disinformation, enlargement and foreign policy issues, including relations with Russia. EU-27 leaders will meet for a Euro Summit in extended format to discuss the report submitted by the Eurogroup on EMU reforms.

Summary of the exchange of views on EU Member States National Declarations (ND) - Committee on Budgetary Control Meeting on 11 April 2019

14-06-2019

Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) held an exchange of views with Mr Olivier Waelbroeck, Director, European Commission, and Ms Eva Lindström, Member of the European Court of Auditors, in which they explored ways to promote the National Declarations (ND). ND are a voluntary public accountability instrument that strengthen the provision of assurance in the management of EU funds, and demonstrate the political commitment towards sound financial management.

Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) held an exchange of views with Mr Olivier Waelbroeck, Director, European Commission, and Ms Eva Lindström, Member of the European Court of Auditors, in which they explored ways to promote the National Declarations (ND). ND are a voluntary public accountability instrument that strengthen the provision of assurance in the management of EU funds, and demonstrate the political commitment towards sound financial management.

La historia del presupuesto de la Unión Europea

14-06-2019

El presupuesto de la Unión Europea se basa en tres pilares: el gasto, la financiación y el control. En este documento se examinan los orígenes del presupuesto, su evolución a través de la planificación plurianual y la presupuestación anual, todo ello en el contexto de los cambios introducidos en las competencias del Parlamento Europeo en materia de presupuesto, así como de la evolución de su financiación y del proceso de control. Desde la creación de la primera Comunidad Europea en 1952 han existido ...

El presupuesto de la Unión Europea se basa en tres pilares: el gasto, la financiación y el control. En este documento se examinan los orígenes del presupuesto, su evolución a través de la planificación plurianual y la presupuestación anual, todo ello en el contexto de los cambios introducidos en las competencias del Parlamento Europeo en materia de presupuesto, así como de la evolución de su financiación y del proceso de control. Desde la creación de la primera Comunidad Europea en 1952 han existido tensiones entre las instituciones europeas y los Estados miembros en torno a la elaboración del presupuesto, así como una estrecha relación entre las reformas en materia de gasto y financiación.

Autor externo

Dr Giacomo Benedetto

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

22-05-2019

The European Commission has proposed a new regulation on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) as part of the next EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period. The European Parliament established its first-reading position on the proposal on 4 April 2019. The new fund will continue to support the EU common fisheries policy and the Union's maritime policy. The proposal aims to simplify the delivery of the fund compared to the very complex legal framework in use for the current EMFF. It ...

The European Commission has proposed a new regulation on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) as part of the next EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period. The European Parliament established its first-reading position on the proposal on 4 April 2019. The new fund will continue to support the EU common fisheries policy and the Union's maritime policy. The proposal aims to simplify the delivery of the fund compared to the very complex legal framework in use for the current EMFF. It therefore presents a more flexible architecture: this would allow Member States to use the funds where they see the greatest need, instead of being bound to a list of pre-defined measures and eligibility rules. Small-scale coastal fisheries and outermost regions would receive greater preferential treatment. It further proposes increased support for international ocean governance and stronger synergies with other EU policies. The fund is also expected to contribute to the development of the blue economy and support the EU's climate objectives. Negotiations with the Council on the proposal are expected to start in the new term. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The European Public Prosecutor’s Office: Strategies For Coping With Complexity

15-05-2019

This study analyses challenges related to the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO) as enhanced cooperation among the current 22 Member States and discusses possible solutions for coping with them. Complexity is identified as a main challenge owing to the EPPO’s specific multilevel structure, the relationship between the EPPO and non-participating Member States, and the fact that the EPPO Regulation leaves many procedural rules to the law of the Member State in which an ...

This study analyses challenges related to the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO) as enhanced cooperation among the current 22 Member States and discusses possible solutions for coping with them. Complexity is identified as a main challenge owing to the EPPO’s specific multilevel structure, the relationship between the EPPO and non-participating Member States, and the fact that the EPPO Regulation leaves many procedural rules to the law of the Member State in which an investigation takes place. Depending on the nature of the challenge, the suggested strategies to cope with complexity encompass legislative, administrative, and monitoring measures.

Autor externo

Hartmut Aden, Maria-Luisa Sanchez-Barrueco, Paul Stephenson

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