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Limits on exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at work: Third proposal

18-02-2019

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing substances. The initiative is proceeding in steps. The first proposal of May 2016 covered 13 priority chemical agents, the second, of January 2017, a further seven. The current (third) proposal addresses an additional five. Broad discussions with scientists and the social partners fed into all three ...

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing substances. The initiative is proceeding in steps. The first proposal of May 2016 covered 13 priority chemical agents, the second, of January 2017, a further seven. The current (third) proposal addresses an additional five. Broad discussions with scientists and the social partners fed into all three proposals. Reacting to the Commission’s set of measures as a whole, trade unions have acknowledged the importance of further improving the existing framework. Actors on the employers’ side have underlined the need to ensure that values are proportionate and feasible in terms of technical implementation. Parliament’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee voted its report on 20 November 2018. It includes the call to bring cytotoxic medicines, which are used in the treatment of cancer, within the scope of the directive, as well as to grant incentives to businesses that comply. Council agreed on its position on 6 December 2018. Trilogue negotiations gave rise to a provisional agreement in January 2019. Once endorsed by the Council, it will be voted in Parliament’s plenary. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders

12-12-2018

In order to respond more effectively to the challenge of criminals and terrorists hiding assets in other Member States, in 2016 the European Commission proposed a regulation on the mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders in criminal matters. The directly applicable instrument removes the need for national transposition, broadens the scope of the current rules to cover new types of confiscation and includes provisions on victims' rights to restitution and compensation. In June 2018, ...

In order to respond more effectively to the challenge of criminals and terrorists hiding assets in other Member States, in 2016 the European Commission proposed a regulation on the mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders in criminal matters. The directly applicable instrument removes the need for national transposition, broadens the scope of the current rules to cover new types of confiscation and includes provisions on victims' rights to restitution and compensation. In June 2018, provisional agreement was reached in interinstitutional negotiations and the European Parliament voted the agreed text on 4 October 2018. The Council followed suit on 6 November 2018. The final act was signed on 14 November and published in the Official Journal of the EU on 28 November 2018. The regulation will apply 24 months after its entry into force, namely from 19 December 2020. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European defence industrial development programme (EDIDP)

28-09-2018

The European Union is facing new security threats amid growing uncertainty about the reliability of some of its allies. As a consequence, it has embarked on a general scalingup of its defence capabilities. A European defence action plan has been agreed and a European Defence Fund created to provide financial support, ranging from the research phase to the acquisition phase of military equipment and technologies. The EDIDP, which will be part of that fund, is destined to provide the European defence ...

The European Union is facing new security threats amid growing uncertainty about the reliability of some of its allies. As a consequence, it has embarked on a general scalingup of its defence capabilities. A European defence action plan has been agreed and a European Defence Fund created to provide financial support, ranging from the research phase to the acquisition phase of military equipment and technologies. The EDIDP, which will be part of that fund, is destined to provide the European defence industry with financial support during the development phase of new products and technologies in areas selected at European level. An agreement was reached in trilogue negotiations in May 2018, and after Parliament and Council had approved the deal, the final legislative act was signed on 18 July 2018. This programme, with a financial envelope of €500 million, is due to run from January 2019 to December 2020.

Multiannual plan for North Sea demersal fisheries

20-09-2018

The European Parliament and Council have adopted a new multiannual plan to manage fisheries in the North Sea and some adjacent maritime areas. The plan covers demersal species (i.e. species living close to the sea bottom). These stocks are exploited by various fishing fleets using various fishing gear, but often catching different species together (mixed fisheries). The North Sea demersal fisheries are conducted by several thousand EU vessels, mainly from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands ...

The European Parliament and Council have adopted a new multiannual plan to manage fisheries in the North Sea and some adjacent maritime areas. The plan covers demersal species (i.e. species living close to the sea bottom). These stocks are exploited by various fishing fleets using various fishing gear, but often catching different species together (mixed fisheries). The North Sea demersal fisheries are conducted by several thousand EU vessels, mainly from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom, and represent over 70 % of EU catches in this area. The plan introduces new rules on how the catch limits for each stock must be set, so that it is fished sustainably. The ranges within which the catch limits are set are based on the best available scientific advice, and updated regularly to take account of the most recent data. The plan also contains safeguard measures to restore stocks when they fall below safe biological limits, and sets a framework for improved cooperation between the Member States concerned at sea-regional level. Fourth edition of a briefing originally drafted by Jean Weissenberger. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 621.885, May 2018.

Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

28-05-2018

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council meeting. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council meeting. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period until 2030, giving greater certainty to both industry and investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee took the lead on the proposal, while it shared competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. The European Parliament and the Council adopted their respective positions in February 2017, and interinstitutional trilogue negotiations were concluded in November 2017. After its adoption by Council and Parliament, the Directive entered into force on 8 April 2018.

New rules for managing the EU external fishing fleet

15-02-2018

The European Parliament and the Council have adopted a new Regulation on the sustainable management of external fishing fleets, which replaces the 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, and covers all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, as well as third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The regulation revised the system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations, so as to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. It extended the scope of the authorisation ...

The European Parliament and the Council have adopted a new Regulation on the sustainable management of external fishing fleets, which replaces the 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, and covers all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, as well as third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The regulation revised the system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations, so as to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. It extended the scope of the authorisation system to include practices such as private agreements between EU companies and third countries, and abusive reflagging operations. Member States are required to authorise fishing vessels using common eligibility criteria, complemented by specific conditions depending on the nature of the authorisation. Part of the electronic fishing authorisations register, showing who fishes for what and where, will for the first time be publicly accessible. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 608.651, July 2017.

Common rules and new framework for securitisation

25-01-2018

In autumn 2015, the European Commission proposed a regulation on securitisation, in the context of the Capital Markets Union initiative. The proposal followed a consultation with stakeholders and took into account initiatives at international (BCBS-IOSCO) and European levels (EBA). The proposal replaces existing rules relating to due diligence, risk retention, transparency and supervision with a uniform regime. It provides a framework to identify simple, transparent and standardised (STS) securitisations ...

In autumn 2015, the European Commission proposed a regulation on securitisation, in the context of the Capital Markets Union initiative. The proposal followed a consultation with stakeholders and took into account initiatives at international (BCBS-IOSCO) and European levels (EBA). The proposal replaces existing rules relating to due diligence, risk retention, transparency and supervision with a uniform regime. It provides a framework to identify simple, transparent and standardised (STS) securitisations and to allow investors to analyse associated risks. The proposal came as a package with a second proposal, to amend the Capital Requirements Regulation applicable to credit institutions and investment firms in respect of securitisation. During the October II plenary session, the European Parliament is due to vote on the compromise agreement struck with the Council in May 2017. This briefing further updates an earlier edition, of July 2016: PE 586.624. See also our updated briefing on the related proposal: PE 608.778.

Securitisation and capital requirements

25-01-2018

As part of its ambition to create a Capital Markets Union, the European Commission wants to revive the securitisation market in the EU, in order to offer new financing tools and ease credit provision, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Its 'securitisation initiative', set out in a proposed regulation on 30 September 2015, would establish a new framework for 'simple, transparent, and standardised' (STS) securitisations. This new initiative also has implications for the overall prudential ...

As part of its ambition to create a Capital Markets Union, the European Commission wants to revive the securitisation market in the EU, in order to offer new financing tools and ease credit provision, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Its 'securitisation initiative', set out in a proposed regulation on 30 September 2015, would establish a new framework for 'simple, transparent, and standardised' (STS) securitisations. This new initiative also has implications for the overall prudential framework for credit institutions and investment firms, therefore the Commission proposed to amend the Capital Requirements Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 accordingly. The proposed amendments would adjust risk retention profiles to reflect properly the specific features of STS securitisations. The most significant changes are: a new hierarchy of risk calculation methods and lower capital requirements for STS. The Council agreed on a general approach on both dossiers in early December 2015. Parliament’s ECON Committee adopted its report a year later, and the two institutions reached agreement on the text in trilogue in June 2017. This briefing further updates an earlier edition of July 2016: PE 573.935. See also our updated briefing on the related proposal: PE 608.777.

Transposing international measures for Atlantic tuna fisheries into EU law

23-01-2018

The European Parliament and Council have adopted a regulation concerning the conservation of tuna and tuna-like species, and the management of fisheries targeting these stocks in the Atlantic Ocean (including adjacent seas such as the Mediterranean). The new regulation, which entered into force on 3 December 2017, transposes into EU law a number of binding recommendations adopted by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), a regional fisheries management organisation ...

The European Parliament and Council have adopted a regulation concerning the conservation of tuna and tuna-like species, and the management of fisheries targeting these stocks in the Atlantic Ocean (including adjacent seas such as the Mediterranean). The new regulation, which entered into force on 3 December 2017, transposes into EU law a number of binding recommendations adopted by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), a regional fisheries management organisation to which the EU is a contracting party. These measures needed to be enacted in EU law to become applicable, notably to operators such as the masters of fishing vessels. When adopting its legislative resolution, the EP also voted on a statement to express its concern at the Commission’s delay in proposing to implement ICCAT recommendations (some dating back to 2008), and urged it to send future proposals for transposition of RFMOs' recommendations within six months of the date of their adoption.

Limits on exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at work

22-01-2018

The European Commission proposes to amend Directive 2004/37/EC by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer-causing chemical agents. According to the Commission, this would improve workers' health protection, increase the effectiveness of the EU framework and promote clarity for economic operators. Overall, the proposal received a broad welcome from stakeholders. After completion of the legislative procedure at first reading in ...

The European Commission proposes to amend Directive 2004/37/EC by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer-causing chemical agents. According to the Commission, this would improve workers' health protection, increase the effectiveness of the EU framework and promote clarity for economic operators. Overall, the proposal received a broad welcome from stakeholders. After completion of the legislative procedure at first reading in the European Parliament and the Council, the presidents of the co-legislators signed the final act on 12 December 2017. The directive applies as from 16 January 2018.