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Transitional provisions for the CAP post 2020

28-01-2021

On 31 October 2019, the European Commission adopted a legislative package aimed at ensuring the continuation of the current common agricultural policy (CAP) until the legislation on the post 2020 CAP is in force. The package includes a proposal for a CAP transitional regulation setting out a number of adjustments to current CAP regulations, concerning their applicability beyond 2020 with new financial allocations. This proposal introduces transitional provisions and amendments that are necessary ...

On 31 October 2019, the European Commission adopted a legislative package aimed at ensuring the continuation of the current common agricultural policy (CAP) until the legislation on the post 2020 CAP is in force. The package includes a proposal for a CAP transitional regulation setting out a number of adjustments to current CAP regulations, concerning their applicability beyond 2020 with new financial allocations. This proposal introduces transitional provisions and amendments that are necessary to ensure the continuity of the CAP through a transitional period between policy cycles and to smooth the passage to the new policy framework envisaged by the post 2020 CAP proposals. It concerns all the basic acts which regulate how the CAP now works. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP horizontal regulation: Financing, management and monitoring of the common agricultural policy for 2021-2027

18-01-2021

As part of the preparation of the EU budget for 2021-2027, the European Commission put forward a new set of regulations to shape the future EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on 1 June 2018. The proposal for a regulation on the financing, management and monitoring of the CAP provides the legislative framework for adapting the financing, management and monitoring rules to a new CAP delivery model. This seeks to achieve more subsidiarity and simplification, with greater responsibility given to Member ...

As part of the preparation of the EU budget for 2021-2027, the European Commission put forward a new set of regulations to shape the future EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on 1 June 2018. The proposal for a regulation on the financing, management and monitoring of the CAP provides the legislative framework for adapting the financing, management and monitoring rules to a new CAP delivery model. This seeks to achieve more subsidiarity and simplification, with greater responsibility given to Member States, a shift from ensuring single transaction compliance to monitoring system performance in each Member State, and reduced 'red tape', among other things. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP strategic plans

18-01-2021

The Commission's legislative proposals on the future of the common agricultural policy (CAP) were published on 1 June 2018. They comprise three proposals: a regulation setting out rules on support for CAP strategic plans; a regulation on the single common market organisation (CMO) and a horizontal regulation on financing, managing and monitoring the CAP. The proposal for a regulation on CAP strategic plans introduces a new delivery model, described by the Commission as a fundamental shift in the ...

The Commission's legislative proposals on the future of the common agricultural policy (CAP) were published on 1 June 2018. They comprise three proposals: a regulation setting out rules on support for CAP strategic plans; a regulation on the single common market organisation (CMO) and a horizontal regulation on financing, managing and monitoring the CAP. The proposal for a regulation on CAP strategic plans introduces a new delivery model, described by the Commission as a fundamental shift in the CAP, involving a shift from compliance towards results and performance. It includes a new distribution of responsibilities between the EU and Member States. A new planning process is proposed which will cover both Pillar I (direct payments) and Pillar II (rural development) of the CAP. Second edition of a briefing originally drafted by James McEldowney and Patrick Kelly. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP transitional rules for 2021 and 2022

10-12-2020

The lengthy negotiations on the EU budget and farm policy post-2020 convinced the European Commission to put forward rules in 2019 to ensure continuity of EU support for farmers and rural areas. The European Parliament is set to debate and vote on these transitional rules, extending current EU farm policy until the new common agricultural policy framework is in place (i.e. until the end of 2022), during the December plenary session.

The lengthy negotiations on the EU budget and farm policy post-2020 convinced the European Commission to put forward rules in 2019 to ensure continuity of EU support for farmers and rural areas. The European Parliament is set to debate and vote on these transitional rules, extending current EU farm policy until the new common agricultural policy framework is in place (i.e. until the end of 2022), during the December plenary session.

CAP amending regulation (CMO)

14-10-2020

The 'amending regulation' is part of a set of three legislative proposals presented by the European Commission with the aim of reshaping and modernising the EU's common agricultural policy (CAP) for 2021 to 2027. It introduces changes to five regulations, including regarding the single common market organisation (CMO). Based on the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) during the previous legislative term, Parliament is expected to debate the framework ...

The 'amending regulation' is part of a set of three legislative proposals presented by the European Commission with the aim of reshaping and modernising the EU's common agricultural policy (CAP) for 2021 to 2027. It introduces changes to five regulations, including regarding the single common market organisation (CMO). Based on the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) during the previous legislative term, Parliament is expected to debate the framework during the October II plenary session and adopt its position for negotiations with the Council.

Agroforestry in the European Union

25-06-2020

Agroforestry is a very ancient agricultural practice that is still widely implemented in certain EU countries, and is gaining renewed interest due to its many economic and environmental benefits. It is a dynamic system combining trees, crops and/or livestock on the same area of land in some form of spatial arrangement or temporal sequence. Prominent examples are the dehesa in Spain (oak trees with livestock grazing underneath) and the Fennoscandian area (covering Finland, Norway, and Sweden in their ...

Agroforestry is a very ancient agricultural practice that is still widely implemented in certain EU countries, and is gaining renewed interest due to its many economic and environmental benefits. It is a dynamic system combining trees, crops and/or livestock on the same area of land in some form of spatial arrangement or temporal sequence. Prominent examples are the dehesa in Spain (oak trees with livestock grazing underneath) and the Fennoscandian area (covering Finland, Norway, and Sweden in their entireties, and a part of Russia), where reindeer husbandry is practised. The main types of agroforestry include the silvopastoral and silvoarable systems, forest farming, hedgerows, riparian buffer strips and kitchen gardens. A number of studies have attempted to classify the existing systems, a task made difficult by the number of possible combinations of woody components/crops/livestock and the variety of criteria to consider. A comprehensive European project on agroforestry suggests that it covers a total area of more than 15 million hectares in the EU, or 52 million hectares if reindeer husbandry is included. Agroforestry systems, which are sustainable and multifunctional, provide many environmental benefits. They contribute to climate change adaptation and mitigation, protect the soil, enhance biodiversity and improve the overall condition of the landscapes. That way, they are also beneficial to the local rural economy, as those improved landscapes offer cultural and recreational opportunities. Moreover, agroforestry farmers can diversify their production, reduce some costs and achieve better productivity. However agroforestry is usually more complex and knowledge-intensive than conventional agriculture and may involve a greater administrative burden. Agroforestry enjoys EU-level recognition and support from the common agricultural policy (CAP). Farmers can receive direct payments per hectare of land under agroforestry, as well as support for the establishment or maintenance of agroforestry systems under the rural development strand of the CAP. Innovation and research in this field may also be supported. The European Parliament has recognised the benefits of agroforestry in several resolutions, and called for more effective support for a range of sustainable production methods, including agroforestry.

Coronavirus crisis support for EU farmers

28-04-2020

EU farmers are among the few key workers who have not seen a dramatic change in their daily routines since the coronavirus crisis began. They are still farming to supply EU citizens with food. Some public health protection measures have however affected farming activities and sales badly. While the EU has taken a number of measures to mitigate this impact, the possibility of further measures is high on the agricultural policy agenda.

EU farmers are among the few key workers who have not seen a dramatic change in their daily routines since the coronavirus crisis began. They are still farming to supply EU citizens with food. Some public health protection measures have however affected farming activities and sales badly. While the EU has taken a number of measures to mitigate this impact, the possibility of further measures is high on the agricultural policy agenda.

The EU sugar sector

16-03-2020

The sugar sector in the European Union provides a source of income for many farmers and sugar manufacturers. The EU is the world's top producer of sugar beet and one of the main sugar manufacturers' and consumer markets. The EU sugar market had been one of the most heavily regulated markets in the agri-food sector for 50 years, until the quota regime ended on 30 September 2017, thereby introducing a new scenario for this segment of the economy. The sector faces challenges on a number of fronts. The ...

The sugar sector in the European Union provides a source of income for many farmers and sugar manufacturers. The EU is the world's top producer of sugar beet and one of the main sugar manufacturers' and consumer markets. The EU sugar market had been one of the most heavily regulated markets in the agri-food sector for 50 years, until the quota regime ended on 30 September 2017, thereby introducing a new scenario for this segment of the economy. The sector faces challenges on a number of fronts. The changed policy environment which resulted from quota elimination, as well as trading conditions due to higher production levels, and the ongoing debate on the agreement with Mercosur have all contributed to a period of uncertainty for commodity prices. Maintaining a viable sugar sector is inextricably linked with the development of agriculture and rural areas. This means the parallel development of economic, social and environmental policy objectives. At an economic level, the fate of sugar farming will help to ensure farmers’ incomes as well as those in the wider processing sector. From a social perspective, keeping jobs in agriculture, manufacturing and services sectors will benefit rural communities. Sugar beet cultivation also allows farmers to diversify their income sources while improving soil quality and encouraging environmentally friendly agricultural practices. Future policy for the sector should focus on risk mitigation. It will also be mindful of the stabilisation of farm incomes; instruments to limit farm income volatility; linking sugar beet production with environmental and climate change objectives, and encouraging the development of a long-term risk management system. This briefing updates and expands an earlier publication, published in April 2018 (PE 620.224).

'From Farm to Fork' strategy on sustainable food

20-01-2020

The 'Farm to Fork' strategy is one of the initiatives announced in President Ursula von der Leyen's political guidelines for the new Commission, as part of the European Green Deal. It aims at creating a sustainable food value chain through legislative and non legislative actions to be presented in spring 2020.

The 'Farm to Fork' strategy is one of the initiatives announced in President Ursula von der Leyen's political guidelines for the new Commission, as part of the European Green Deal. It aims at creating a sustainable food value chain through legislative and non legislative actions to be presented in spring 2020.

The EU fruit and vegetable sector: Main features, challenges and prospects

11-03-2019

Fruit and vegetables accounted for approximately 14 % of the total value of the EU's agricultural production in 2018. This is a fundamental sector for many EU Member States, especially those where it is particularly well developed, such as in the Mediterranean region and in some northern and eastern European countries. Moreover, all EU Member States produce at least a few types of fruit and vegetables. Apples and tomatoes are the main products of the richly diversified produce of the EU's fruit and ...

Fruit and vegetables accounted for approximately 14 % of the total value of the EU's agricultural production in 2018. This is a fundamental sector for many EU Member States, especially those where it is particularly well developed, such as in the Mediterranean region and in some northern and eastern European countries. Moreover, all EU Member States produce at least a few types of fruit and vegetables. Apples and tomatoes are the main products of the richly diversified produce of the EU's fruit and vegetable farms. Mostly small-sized with relatively high labour input, these farms earn incomes ranging from average (for fruit specialists) to very high (for horticulture specialists, including also flower and ornamental plant production). EU trade in fruit and vegetables is characterised by the predominance of internal over external flows, where the EU is traditionally a net importer. To strengthen the resilience of both the fruit and vegetable sector and its operators, and to boost the consumption of their produce, the EU has in place a comprehensive support system, especially through the regulatory framework for the common organisation of the markets in agricultural products. Rules on producer organisations and their operational programmes, crisis management and marketing standards, help the functioning of the sector, with additional support from the EU school fruit and vegetables scheme, as well as from the EU promotion and quality policies, income support and rural development measures, valid for all agricultural sectors. Recently passed EU legislation has already brought in important adjustments for the fruit and vegetable sector and no further major policy changes are currently anticipated. It will be its capacity to overcome its structural vulnerability and weak organisation, adopt innovation and respond to consumer needs that will shape its future.

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