16

vaste(t)

Sõna(d)
Väljaande liik
Poliitikavaldkond
Autor
Märksõna
Kuupäev

CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles

09-04-2019

In May 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation setting the first-ever CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles in the EU, as part of the third mobility package. It would require the average CO2 emissions from new trucks in 2025 to be 15 % lower than in 2019. For 2030, the proposal sets an indicative reduction target of at least 30 % compared to 2019. Special incentives are provided for zero- and low-emission vehicles. The proposed regulation applies to four categories of ...

In May 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation setting the first-ever CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles in the EU, as part of the third mobility package. It would require the average CO2 emissions from new trucks in 2025 to be 15 % lower than in 2019. For 2030, the proposal sets an indicative reduction target of at least 30 % compared to 2019. Special incentives are provided for zero- and low-emission vehicles. The proposed regulation applies to four categories of large trucks, which together account for 65 %-70 % of CO2 emissions from heavy-duty vehicles. The Commission proposes to review the legislation in 2022 in order to set a binding target for 2030, and to extend its application to smaller trucks, buses, coaches and trailers. In the European Parliament, the proposal was referred to the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, which adopted its report on 18 October 2018. Parliament voted on the report on 14 November 2018. Trilogue negotiations were concluded on 18 February 2019 with an agreement that sets a legally binding 30 % reduction target for the average fleet emissions of new trucks by 2030. The Parliament is expected to vote on the agreed text during the April II plenary session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Revision of the Eurovignette Directive

17-10-2018

The Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a directive amending Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (known as the Eurovignette Directive) in May 2017. The initiative is linked to two wider strategies, the energy union strategy, which inter alia envisaged a road transport package, including more efficient infrastructure pricing, and the Commission’s strategy for low-emission mobility. The proposal was presented within the context ...

The Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a directive amending Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (known as the Eurovignette Directive) in May 2017. The initiative is linked to two wider strategies, the energy union strategy, which inter alia envisaged a road transport package, including more efficient infrastructure pricing, and the Commission’s strategy for low-emission mobility. The proposal was presented within the context of the Commission’s ‘Europe on the move’ package that seeks to modernise mobility and transport and includes several legislative proposals. The objective of the Eurovignette proposal, which substantially amends the existing legislation by extending the scope of vehicles covered, is to make progress in the application of the ‘polluter pays’ and ‘user pays’ principles. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Setting CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles

13-09-2018

This initial appraisal assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment accompanying its proposal for a regulation setting CO2 emission performance standards for some categories of new 'rigid lorries' and 'tractors'. The proposal seeks to contribute to achieving the climate target set by the Paris Agreement, adopted on 12 December 2015, i.e. 'holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts ...

This initial appraisal assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment accompanying its proposal for a regulation setting CO2 emission performance standards for some categories of new 'rigid lorries' and 'tractors'. The proposal seeks to contribute to achieving the climate target set by the Paris Agreement, adopted on 12 December 2015, i.e. 'holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels'. In addition, it intends to help Member States achieving the national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets in the road transport sector for the period 2021-2030 set by the 'effort sharing' regulation proposed by the Commission. The appraisal concludes that the impact assessment clearly defines the problems to be addressed, although in a couple of cases only one option is considered (in addition to the baseline). In such cases, the Commission's approach appears not to be entirely in line with the better regulation toolbox. The analysis carried out appears to be sound and well evidenced, providing ample and detailed insight into the issues considered. The analysis of impacts focuses on the economic and environmental dimension, consistently with the manner in which the problems have been defined. Their quantitative assessment is based on three models which, according to the IA, have already been 'successfully' used in previous impact assessment regarding transport, energy and climate policies, The IA appears to have addressed all of the Regulatory Scrutiny Board's recommendations, and the legislative proposal seems to be consistent with the analysis carried out in the IA.

Review of CO2 emission standards for new cars and vans

31-01-2018

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 8 November 2017 and referred to European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI). According to the IA, road transport caused 22 % of all EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2015, 73 % of which came from cars and vans (IA, p. 19). The transport sector (except for aviation) is not covered by ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 8 November 2017 and referred to European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI). According to the IA, road transport caused 22 % of all EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2015, 73 % of which came from cars and vans (IA, p. 19). The transport sector (except for aviation) is not covered by the EU's emissions trading system (ETS), adopted in 2005 in the context of international efforts to reduce GHG. Instead, the EU has put sector-specific legislation in place, in particular to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. When it became clear that a 1999 voluntary emissions reduction agreement between the European Commission and the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers had not delivered, the EU adopted two regulations on mandatory CO2 standards for all new passenger cars and vans, in 2009 and 2011 respectively. Both were amended in 2014 with new emissions targets. After the Paris Agreement, countries such as China, the United States of America (USA) and Japan quickly began implementing ambitious policies for low-carbon transport. To comply with the agreement, the EU included the proposal to amend the current legislation in the European Commission's 2017 work programme. The review of the current regulations started in 2015, with publication of the European Commission's extensive ex-post evaluation. It found the current regulations effective and more efficient than expected, but also identified weaknesses. These included the measurement of emissions (test procedures), the utility parameter (mass or footprint) and emissions from energy and vehicle production, currently not covered (IA, pp. 15-16). As announced in its May 2017 communication, Europe on the Move, the Commission is pursuing an integrated approach to address all factors and actors relevant for CO2 emissions, from environment to industry (IA, p. 11). This proposal is therefore part of a comprehensive legislative package aiming to ensure 'clean, competitive and connected mobility for all' (IA, pp. 11-12, 17) and is flanked by important initiatives such as the EU action plan on alternative fuels infrastructure, revision of the Clean Vehicles Directive and the battery initiative.

Research for TRAN Committee - Odometer tampering: measures to prevent it

15-11-2017

Odometer tampering is still a widespread malpractice in the European Union and it affects almost all second-hand car markets of its Member States. This study examines how improvement can be made by presenting the best practices implemented in some Member States and countries outside of the EU, while emphasising their success factors and results achieved. Furthermore, the study highlights the available technological developments and IT solutions to combat the phenomenon with a view to a potential ...

Odometer tampering is still a widespread malpractice in the European Union and it affects almost all second-hand car markets of its Member States. This study examines how improvement can be made by presenting the best practices implemented in some Member States and countries outside of the EU, while emphasising their success factors and results achieved. Furthermore, the study highlights the available technological developments and IT solutions to combat the phenomenon with a view to a potential further application by the European automotive industry.

Parlamendiväline autor

Enrico Pastori, Raffaele Vergnani

Monitoring and reporting of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new heavy-duty vehicles

26-09-2017

The IA clearly defines the problems and the objectives of the proposed initiative, and relies on comprehensive and up to date sources of information. Overall, the objectives appear to be relevant, measurable, and achievable; however, some discrepancy seems to exist between the definition of the operational objective and the indicators suggested for monitoring and evaluating the impacts of the proposed initiative. In addition, two of the suggested indicators could have been better qualified, in order ...

The IA clearly defines the problems and the objectives of the proposed initiative, and relies on comprehensive and up to date sources of information. Overall, the objectives appear to be relevant, measurable, and achievable; however, some discrepancy seems to exist between the definition of the operational objective and the indicators suggested for monitoring and evaluating the impacts of the proposed initiative. In addition, two of the suggested indicators could have been better qualified, in order to make them operational. The IA lacks any precise quantification of the impacts of monitoring and reporting over time on HDV CO2 emissions in the EU, although this weakness is acknowledged and attributed to the lack of reliable methodology. The analysis of the impact on the competitiveness of SMEs appears to be, in general, insufficiently developed or explained. The Commission consulted a broad range of stakeholders, whose views are described and analysed extensively; however, at least two issues considered relevant by the large majority of stakeholders, were not taken up and dealt with in the IA. The IA appears to have addressed most of the RSB recommendations; however, the aspect regarding data sensitivity and the potential market-disruptive risks relating to the monitoring and data collecting system seems still to be insufficiently illustrated and the arguments used lack any supporting evidence. Finally, the IA seems to make a reasonable case for the preferred option, which is reflected in the legislative proposal; however it is unclear why vehicles of categories O3 and O4 (i.e. trailers), included in the scope of Article 2, are not covered by the IA.

Multimodal and Combined Freight Transport: Implementation Appraisal

07-07-2017

Council Directive 92/106/EEC lays down rules applicable to combined transport of goods. Various resources show that there are currently several challenges linked with the implementation of the directive. These include, for instance, a broad and ambiguous definition of combined transport, outdated provisions of the directive, the need to align these provisions with the new economic reality and a need for a unified combined transport document. These challenges influence harmonisation of combined freight ...

Council Directive 92/106/EEC lays down rules applicable to combined transport of goods. Various resources show that there are currently several challenges linked with the implementation of the directive. These include, for instance, a broad and ambiguous definition of combined transport, outdated provisions of the directive, the need to align these provisions with the new economic reality and a need for a unified combined transport document. These challenges influence harmonisation of combined freight transport and limit the fulfilment of the directive's goals. The European Parliament has called on the European Commission to update the directive to respond to these challenges. Similar recommendations have come from the European Economic and Social Committee and from representatives of various stakeholder groups. Finally, the European Commission itself has expressed its intention to revise the directive as part of the enhancement of the social legislation in the area of road transport. It is expected that the European Commission will submit this proposal in the fourth quarter of 2017.

The Eurovignette and the framework to promote a European electronic toll service (EETS)

06-03-2017

The various reports and assessments show that there are considerable differences in the way vehicle road charges have been implemented across Member States. This means that a fully integrated market is yet to be reached. This is partly due to the flexibility contained in the various legislations which allowed Member States to apply systems that first and foremost fitted with their needs. As transport policy has increasingly become more interlinked with reducing emissions, these differences have become ...

The various reports and assessments show that there are considerable differences in the way vehicle road charges have been implemented across Member States. This means that a fully integrated market is yet to be reached. This is partly due to the flexibility contained in the various legislations which allowed Member States to apply systems that first and foremost fitted with their needs. As transport policy has increasingly become more interlinked with reducing emissions, these differences have become more problematic. The available evidence shows that there are qualitative differences between the road charging systems with distance-based charges being the most effective option. Indeed, it is clear that a move towards this system has been happening for some time now, and that road charges generally vary depending on emissions. The reviews did not find evidence of discrimination against any HGV users. In the area of electronic tolling, substantial variations can also be found. While dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) is the most used system, significant challenges around inter-operability remain. In fact some argue that none of the current systems in use under EETS will increase operability. Technological advances are nevertheless making harmonising these services easier. Although some argue that the gradual harmonisation seen to date has more to do with new technologies than with EU legislation. While a harmonised system is important for the internal market, road charges have also become closely linked with the reduction in emissions according to the 'polluter pay' principle. Following that logic, it would be difficult not to consider road charges for all vehicles. Especially since passenger car emissions make up a higher proportion of GHG emissions than HGVs. Indeed, the Commission's consultation on the topic confirms that wide ranging options are being considered. A broader scope raises more challenges, and as road charges get more sophisticated, i.e. time-based for example, more care needs to be taken that rates do not discriminate against some road users, in particular non-nationals. However, road charges currently make up only a very small proportion of the total costs for the transport sector, which means that behavioural changes solely based on these charges are likely to be limited. To significantly reduce transport emissions, much broader actions will be required.

Weights and dimensions of trucks and buses

02-03-2015

Heavy-goods vehicles and buses circulating within the European Union must comply with certain rules regarding their weight, height, width and length, in accordance with the Weights and Dimensions Directive. The revision of the current Directive aims at improving road safety, energy efficiency and the environmental performance of road transport through greener and safer trucks.

Heavy-goods vehicles and buses circulating within the European Union must comply with certain rules regarding their weight, height, width and length, in accordance with the Weights and Dimensions Directive. The revision of the current Directive aims at improving road safety, energy efficiency and the environmental performance of road transport through greener and safer trucks.

Mega trucks: a solution or a problem?

07-05-2014

Longer and heavier vehicles (LHVs) also known as mega trucks, gigaliners, eurocombis, and ecoliners, are currently used in some EU Member States for transportation of freight by road. The EU has recently been discussing the question of whether to change the rules on their use for cross-border freight traffic around the EU. The pros and cons are explained in our briefing.

Longer and heavier vehicles (LHVs) also known as mega trucks, gigaliners, eurocombis, and ecoliners, are currently used in some EU Member States for transportation of freight by road. The EU has recently been discussing the question of whether to change the rules on their use for cross-border freight traffic around the EU. The pros and cons are explained in our briefing.

Eelseisvad üritused

10-12-2019
EU institutional dynamics: Ten years after the Lisbon Treaty
Muu sündmus -
EPRS
11-12-2019
Take-aways from 2019 and outlook for 2020: What Think Tanks are Thinking
Muu sündmus -
EPRS

Partnerid

Olge toimuvaga kursis

email update imageMeilipõhine uudistesüsteem

Euroopa Parlamendiga seotud inimeste tegevust ja sündmusi saab jälgida e-posti põhise uudistesüsteemi abil, mis saadab uudised otse Teie e-posti aadressile. Süsteem hõlmab parlamendiliikmetega seotud viimaseid uudiseid, uudisteteenuseid ja mõttekoja Think Tank teemasid.

Süsteemi saab siseneda Euroopa Parlamendi veebisaidi kõikidelt lehtedelt. Kasutajaks registreerumine on lihtne: Think Tanki uudiste saamiseks sisestage oma e-posti aadress, valige Teid huvitav teema ja märkige, kui sageli soovite uudiseid saada (iga päev, iga nädal või iga kuu). Seejärel saadetakse Teile e-kiri, milles oleval lingil klõpsates saate registreerimise kinnitada.

RSS imageRSS-kanalid

Veebisaidil olevaid uudiseid ja täiendusi saab jälgida RSS-kanali abil.

RSS-kanali konfigureerimiseks klõpsake allpool toodud linki.