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The future of regional airports: Challenges and opportunities

26-02-2021

Regional airports are an important part of the aviation system in the European Union (EU). They are engines of socio-economic development and improve accessibility to certain locations, in particular those that are remote or not well served by other forms of transportation. They also have a vital role in terms of economic and social cohesion, stimulating tourism and employment, as well as facilitating access to essential services. In addition, they can help to reduce congestion at major hub airports ...

Regional airports are an important part of the aviation system in the European Union (EU). They are engines of socio-economic development and improve accessibility to certain locations, in particular those that are remote or not well served by other forms of transportation. They also have a vital role in terms of economic and social cohesion, stimulating tourism and employment, as well as facilitating access to essential services. In addition, they can help to reduce congestion at major hub airports. The Covid 19 pandemic has hit regional airports hard, especially those more dependent on passenger traffic, which has been more severely hit than cargo traffic. The situation is so difficult that without government support, many regional airports, which serve local communities, face the risk of insolvency. Meanwhile, the pandemic is putting airports under pressure to become more digital. Moreover, a greater focus on tackling climate change is driving various projects to make airports more sustainable. The recovery from the crisis is likely to take several years. It will depend on several factors, such as the duration and magnitude of the crisis, pace of vaccination and consumer confidence. The speed with which the economy recovers will also affect how long the recovery of air travel will take. All this requires support. The EU has taken steps to ensure that Member States can make full use of the flexibility allowed under State aid rules, to provide regional airports with support to overcome this unprecedented crisis. Since March 2020, the European Commission has approved numerous State aid schemes from which regional airports can benefit. The EU can also support airports through its Recovery and Resilience Facility, which aims at making Europe more sustainable, resilient and better prepared for the challenges and opportunities of the green and digital transitions.

At a glance - Research for TRAN Committee - Transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas

05-02-2021

The study investigates key challenges and trends concerning transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas . It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects already implemented as well as policy recommendations aimed at overcoming those identified challenges and gaps.

The study investigates key challenges and trends concerning transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas . It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects already implemented as well as policy recommendations aimed at overcoming those identified challenges and gaps.

Parlamendiväline autor

VVA: Luca BISASCHI, Liviu CALOFIR , Jessica CARNEIRO, Davide CECCANTI, Francesco ROMANO, and Malin CARLBERG TEPR: Ian SKINNER

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - February 2021

04-02-2021

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Research for TRAN Committee: Transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas

03-02-2021

This study investigates the key challenges and trends concerning the provision of transport policies and infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas. It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects implemented in these areas. Finally, it provides policymakers with an array of policy recommendations aimed at overcoming the identified challenges and gaps.

This study investigates the key challenges and trends concerning the provision of transport policies and infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas. It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects implemented in these areas. Finally, it provides policymakers with an array of policy recommendations aimed at overcoming the identified challenges and gaps.

Parlamendiväline autor

Luca BISASCHI, Francesco ROMANO, Malin CARLBERG, Jessica CARNEIRO, Davide CECCANTI, and Liviu CALOFIR.

EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement: An analytical overview

02-02-2021

This EPRS publication seeks to provide an analytical overview of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), which was agreed between the two parties on 24 December and signed by them on 30 December 2020, and has been provisionally applied since 1 January 2021. The European Parliament is currently considering the Agreement with a view to voting on giving its consent to conclusion by the Council on behalf of the Union. The paper analyses many ...

This EPRS publication seeks to provide an analytical overview of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), which was agreed between the two parties on 24 December and signed by them on 30 December 2020, and has been provisionally applied since 1 January 2021. The European Parliament is currently considering the Agreement with a view to voting on giving its consent to conclusion by the Council on behalf of the Union. The paper analyses many of the areas covered in the agreement, including the institutional framework and arrangements for dispute settlement, trade in goods, services and investment, digital trade, energy, the level playing field, transport, social security coordination and visas for short-term visits, fisheries, law enforcement and judicial coordination in criminal matters, and participation in Union programmes. It looks at the main provisions of the Agreement in each area, setting them in context, and also gives an overview of the two parties' published negotiating positions in the respective areas.

Research for TRAN Committee-Sustainable and smart urban transport

26-01-2021

Recent trends and developments indicate a growing user-centric approach to mobility, prioritising individual needs and users’ interests. Disruptive emerging technologies and shared mobility solutions bring new stakeholders to the urban ecosystem. COVID-19 has changed behaviours, with walking, cycling and private car use increasing. E-commerce demand has increased significantly, and contactless solutions are still preferred.

Recent trends and developments indicate a growing user-centric approach to mobility, prioritising individual needs and users’ interests. Disruptive emerging technologies and shared mobility solutions bring new stakeholders to the urban ecosystem. COVID-19 has changed behaviours, with walking, cycling and private car use increasing. E-commerce demand has increased significantly, and contactless solutions are still preferred.

Parlamendiväline autor

Università degli Studi Roma Tre: Giacomo Lozzi, Edoardo Marcucci, Valerio Gatta Panteia B.V: Maria Rodrigues, Tharsis Teoh, Carolina Ramos, Eline Jonkers

Sustainable and smart mobility strategy

20-01-2021

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion ...

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion and loss of biodiversity. EU ambitions to address these negative impacts have increased over the years. In December 2019, the European Commission put forward the European Green Deal that aims to make the EU carbon neutral by 2050. This goal was subsequently endorsed by the European Parliament and EU Member States. To achieve climate neutrality, the EU transport sector has to cut its CO2 emissions by 90 %. This requirement is in stark contrast with the past trend: despite previously adopted measures, transport is the only sector in which greenhouse gas emissions have kept growing. The Commission has therefore proposed a strategy outlining how it wants to transform the EU transport sector and align it with the European Green Deal, by making it green, digital and resilient. While transport stakeholders have welcomed parts of the strategy as steps in the right direction, concerns about the text’s high ambitions and lack of concrete elements have been voiced. The Commission is to start proposing the measures envisaged in 2021. It remains to be seen to what extent, with what modifications and how fast they will be adopted and then implemented by EU Member States, shaping transport transformation for the years to come.

The trans-European transport network: State of play in 2020

22-12-2020

For a number of years now, the EU has been developing a transport network across its territory to link its regions and countries, and thus also markets and people. This large-scale project – the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) – should be efficient and sustainable, and contribute to economic activity. It covers the development of all transport modes, yet seeks to shift a significant part of road transport to less polluting modes, in particular rail and inland waterways. In 2013, the EU Member ...

For a number of years now, the EU has been developing a transport network across its territory to link its regions and countries, and thus also markets and people. This large-scale project – the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) – should be efficient and sustainable, and contribute to economic activity. It covers the development of all transport modes, yet seeks to shift a significant part of road transport to less polluting modes, in particular rail and inland waterways. In 2013, the EU Member States agreed to have the 'core' network ready by 2030, and set aside unprecedented amounts of funding to achieve this goal. Seven years later, the European Commission is taking stock of what has been achieved, what remains to be done and what will not be achieved within the 2030 horizon. It has already proposed changes to the EU financial support for TEN-T for the 2021-2027 period and reviews of the relevant guidelines, and plans to propose an adapted set of rules to the European Parliament and the Council in 2021. These should better support transport decarbonisation and digitalisation, as well as boost infrastructure resilience to climate change. This briefing looks at the latest updates to the work plans prepared by the European Coordinators, the experts each responsible for advancing one branch of the network through having the best grassroots information available to them. Their views are complemented with the more general findings from reports published by the European Court of Auditors. Some thorny issues of past and future financing of the TEN-T projects are mentioned and, finally, an outline of expected developments is given, both related to the United Kingdom's exit from the EU and the EU's next multiannual budget, for 2021-2027.

What if artificial intelligence in medical imaging could accelerate Covid-19 treatment?

21-12-2020

Thermal imaging cameras are currently being installed in office buildings, hospitals, shopping malls, schools and airports as a means of detecting people with fever-like symptoms. Given that these cameras are not necessarily designed to operate as medical devices, there are questions about their suitability in the context of the current pandemic. This note provides an overview of the use of thermal imaging empowered with artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, its suitability in the context of ...

Thermal imaging cameras are currently being installed in office buildings, hospitals, shopping malls, schools and airports as a means of detecting people with fever-like symptoms. Given that these cameras are not necessarily designed to operate as medical devices, there are questions about their suitability in the context of the current pandemic. This note provides an overview of the use of thermal imaging empowered with artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, its suitability in the context of the current pandemic and the core technical limitations of this technology. The main legal responses and ethical concerns related to the use of AI in the context of thermal imaging at entry points to identify and triage people who may have elevated temperatures are also examined.

What if technology and culture combined to boost a green recovery?

21-12-2020

With its recent European Green Deal framework, the EU is striving to achieve climate neutrality in its economy by 2050 and, simultaneously, bring itself on the path of recovery from the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Technology will inevitably play a significant part in this process. However, historical experience tells us that culture and aesthetic have too had significant roles in recovery from a crises, be it war, economic recession, or an epidemic.

With its recent European Green Deal framework, the EU is striving to achieve climate neutrality in its economy by 2050 and, simultaneously, bring itself on the path of recovery from the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Technology will inevitably play a significant part in this process. However, historical experience tells us that culture and aesthetic have too had significant roles in recovery from a crises, be it war, economic recession, or an epidemic.

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