13

tulos(ta)

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Päivämäärä

Argentina: Economic indicators and trade with EU

07-12-2018

In 2017, Argentina’s economy continued its gradual recovery from major macroeconomic imbalances with a GDP per capita growth rate of 2.9% thanks to austerity measures and a comprehensive reform agenda. However, inflation at 25.7% and unemployment at 8.5% remained high. Whereas economic fundamentals were slowly improving and the country’s political context remained stable after president Mauricio Macri made political gains at the mid-term legislative elections in October 2017, a crisis of confidence ...

In 2017, Argentina’s economy continued its gradual recovery from major macroeconomic imbalances with a GDP per capita growth rate of 2.9% thanks to austerity measures and a comprehensive reform agenda. However, inflation at 25.7% and unemployment at 8.5% remained high. Whereas economic fundamentals were slowly improving and the country’s political context remained stable after president Mauricio Macri made political gains at the mid-term legislative elections in October 2017, a crisis of confidence hit the economy in spring 2018. The crisis exposed vulnerabilities resulting from Argentina’s fiscal and current account deficit and large foreign-denominated debt. As the peso continued its downward trend in autumn 2018, although Argentina secured an IMF US$50 billion credit line and committed to new austerity measures, the economic context is likely to harden ahead of the 2019 presidential elections. With a share of 16.2% of Argentina’s overall trade, the EU is the country’s second largest trading partner after Brazil that accounts for 21.9%. In 2017, EU exports to Argentina increased to almost €10 billion, while EU imports slightly decreased to more than €8 billion. Total imports of primary products from Argentina declined and those of manufactures, notably chemicals, grew. EU exports of both primary products and manufactures, particularly machinery and appliances as well as transport equipment, increased.

Workshop: Facilitating external trade via border management

24-05-2017

The subject of trade facilitation and border management lies at the heart of EU trade policy, which seeks to take advantage of global value chains for the benefit of workers, consumers and businesses. This demands that goods may flow smoothly across borders without jeopardising EU values and standards. Trade facilitation principles help reduce the cost of cross-border trade in goods while safeguarding regulatory control objectives. Good border management practice is integral to trade facilitation ...

The subject of trade facilitation and border management lies at the heart of EU trade policy, which seeks to take advantage of global value chains for the benefit of workers, consumers and businesses. This demands that goods may flow smoothly across borders without jeopardising EU values and standards. Trade facilitation principles help reduce the cost of cross-border trade in goods while safeguarding regulatory control objectives. Good border management practice is integral to trade facilitation. In this study many ideas and examples about how borders management can be improved are shown. The key is coordination, cooperation and integration within the respective border agencies (intra-agency), between the many border agencies (inter-agency) and international (with colleagues across the border and EU trade partners). Despite considerable policy interest, research is still in its infancy. There is much demand for further enquiry. This paper discusses relevant principles, ideas and concepts and concludes with a list of recommendations. This includes the recommendation to develop suitable EU institutions in aid of trade facilitation as well as for research.

Proceedings of the Workshop on "Trade and Economic Relations with Asia"

07-03-2016

This publication consists of the proceedings and of three studies which were presented during the workshop on trade and economic relations with Asia: - Asia as a new global engine: foreign trade and regional cooperation ; - EU external trade strategy vis-à-vis Asia ; - Implementation of the EU-Republic of Korea FTA.

This publication consists of the proceedings and of three studies which were presented during the workshop on trade and economic relations with Asia: - Asia as a new global engine: foreign trade and regional cooperation ; - EU external trade strategy vis-à-vis Asia ; - Implementation of the EU-Republic of Korea FTA.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

Alessia AMIGHINI, Elisa BORGHI, Rodolfo HELG and Lucia TAJOLI

Myanmar/Burma: The next tiger?

22-10-2015

Decades of economic mismanagement have left formerly wealthy Myanmar/Burma one of the poorest countries in the world. However, prospects have brightened recently – foreign trade and investment are booming, growth is accelerating and decrepit infrastructure is being rebuilt, giving the country a chance of becoming the next south-east Asian 'tiger' economy.

Decades of economic mismanagement have left formerly wealthy Myanmar/Burma one of the poorest countries in the world. However, prospects have brightened recently – foreign trade and investment are booming, growth is accelerating and decrepit infrastructure is being rebuilt, giving the country a chance of becoming the next south-east Asian 'tiger' economy.

European Union trade policy [What Think Tanks are thinking]

13-07-2015

International trade is an area where the European Union has an unquestionable global clout. It is the world's biggest trading bloc while trade policy is an exclusive power of the EU. The EU faces numerous challenges in the trade area, notably talks on the Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership (TTIP), an agreement with the United States, the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA), an accord currently being negotiated by 24 members of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and, in general reviving the ...

International trade is an area where the European Union has an unquestionable global clout. It is the world's biggest trading bloc while trade policy is an exclusive power of the EU. The EU faces numerous challenges in the trade area, notably talks on the Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership (TTIP), an agreement with the United States, the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA), an accord currently being negotiated by 24 members of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and, in general reviving the Doha Round of world trade negotiations. On 8 July, the European Parliament approved its recommendations on TTIP to EU trade negotiators. This note offers links to recent studies and reports from major international think tanks on EU trade policies, divided into a section devoted to TTIP, the most pending current trade issue and other trade matters.

The future of the EU trade policy

26-06-2015

After years of relative stagnation and emphasis on multilateral negotiations (WTO), the European Union has instigated an impressive number of trade negotiations, some successfully concluded. The scene is currently dominated by negotiations with the US (TTIP) and Japan. The success of the current Commission will greatly depend on the outcome of these negotiations. The Union's trade strategy cannot be limited to the creation of new negotiation tables, but must also ensure the proper implementation ...

After years of relative stagnation and emphasis on multilateral negotiations (WTO), the European Union has instigated an impressive number of trade negotiations, some successfully concluded. The scene is currently dominated by negotiations with the US (TTIP) and Japan. The success of the current Commission will greatly depend on the outcome of these negotiations. The Union's trade strategy cannot be limited to the creation of new negotiation tables, but must also ensure the proper implementation of negotiated agreements and combat the rise of new non-tariff barriers. The European Union and its bodies must also be able to convince civil society that its actions are correct and secure the solid support of Member States and public opinion for the new international agreements which will gradually come into force. This significant objective can only be achieved if the Union's trade policy is able to incorporate the aspirations of European citizens and provide coherent responses, based on the ongoing and unconditional defence of the common interest. Obviously, this objective does not merely involve the Commission, but calls for a proactive and credible contribution from the European Parliament and the Council.

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