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Trade and Economic relations between the EU and the GCC countries

06-12-2017

The EU and the six member countries of the GCC have started negotiations for an FTA long ago, in 1990, suspended since 2008. Meanwhile, GCC countries, suffering from the drop in oil price since mid-2014, have engaged in extremely ambitious economic programmes for the diversification of their economies too dependent on hydrocarbons. Within the institutional economic dialogue set between the EU and the GCC countries, the European parliament offered its diplomacy to organise this conference in order ...

The EU and the six member countries of the GCC have started negotiations for an FTA long ago, in 1990, suspended since 2008. Meanwhile, GCC countries, suffering from the drop in oil price since mid-2014, have engaged in extremely ambitious economic programmes for the diversification of their economies too dependent on hydrocarbons. Within the institutional economic dialogue set between the EU and the GCC countries, the European parliament offered its diplomacy to organise this conference in order to bring EU businesses closer to GCC institutional. Academic speakers, EU and GCC institutional as much as EU experienced companies praised for partnership instead of competition. This workshop opens the door to further initiatives of economic diplomacy by the European parliament.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

Oliver CORNOCK, Managing Editor for the Middle East at the Oxford Business Group, UK. Dr Jean-François SEZNEC, Professor for the Middle East and Gulf region at Georgetown and SAIS Universities in Washington, US.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP): Potential regional and global impacts

12-05-2016

On 4 February 2016, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement was signed by 12 countries: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam. It encompasses about 800 million people, and the participating countries account for roughly a quarter of global trade and approximately 40% of the world's GDP. The TPP – described by US President Barack Obama as 'a regional agreement that will have broad-based membership and the high standards ...

On 4 February 2016, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement was signed by 12 countries: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam. It encompasses about 800 million people, and the participating countries account for roughly a quarter of global trade and approximately 40% of the world's GDP. The TPP – described by US President Barack Obama as 'a regional agreement that will have broad-based membership and the high standards worthy of a 21st century trade agreement' – provides deeper liberalisation for trade in goods and services and introduces a set of common rules in a number of fields, going beyond current WTO plus commitments in existing free trade agreements. It is highly probable that the TPP, although yet to be ratified, will influence the way that regional free trade agreements, including the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), develop. Alongside China's growing stature and the increase in intraregional economic relations in the Asia-Pacific region, the TPP could adversely affect the interests of the EU. It remains to be seen how quickly the forthcoming ratification and implementation process can be completed, what the ultimate economic significance of the TPP will be, and whether other countries will be able to join the partnership.

The TTIP’s Potential Impact on Developing Countries: A Review of Existing Literature and Selected Issues

29-04-2015

The position and concerns of developing countries have only belatedly entered the discussion over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). While poor countries may gain much from the positive effects of the TTIP, their precarious positions means that they may be less able to react and adapt to negative consequences. The EU is required to assess the development effects of its policies, including trade policies, by the Lisbon Treaty. Although the shape and scope of the final TTIP ...

The position and concerns of developing countries have only belatedly entered the discussion over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). While poor countries may gain much from the positive effects of the TTIP, their precarious positions means that they may be less able to react and adapt to negative consequences. The EU is required to assess the development effects of its policies, including trade policies, by the Lisbon Treaty. Although the shape and scope of the final TTIP agreement is not yet known, economic analyses have identified different ways in which it could affect developing countries and influence the global trading system. Several economic studies have also attempted to measure the possible outcomes for different countries and regions. While it appears that the negative impact of trade diversion and preference erosion is likely to be small, there may be notable exceptions, including risks to the position of some countries in international value chains. Proposals to address such negative consequences include concrete measures for affected countries, such as extending unilateral preferences and shaping the TTIP in such a way as to facilitate positive effects. Extending the principle of mutual recognition or equivalence to third parties and defining liberal rules of origin in the agreement are particularly important.

EU-Asia trade relations beyond China

09-10-2012

While the focus is often on China, the EU is also deepening trade relations with other Asian countries. This paper aims to show levels of trade between the EU and nine Asian countries – India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Taking EU, US and China in comparison, it looks at trade in both goods and services, to measure the importance of EU trade for those countries, and how important they are for the EU.

While the focus is often on China, the EU is also deepening trade relations with other Asian countries. This paper aims to show levels of trade between the EU and nine Asian countries – India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Taking EU, US and China in comparison, it looks at trade in both goods and services, to measure the importance of EU trade for those countries, and how important they are for the EU.

Western Balkan countries

13-03-2012

In the context of EU enlargement, this document provides statistical background for six Western Balkan countries. Croatia is the acceding country which is due to become the 28th EU Member State on 1 July 2013; the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Montenegro and Serbia are candidate countries. Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina are potential candidates.

In the context of EU enlargement, this document provides statistical background for six Western Balkan countries. Croatia is the acceding country which is due to become the 28th EU Member State on 1 July 2013; the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Montenegro and Serbia are candidate countries. Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina are potential candidates.

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