4

tulos(ta)

Hakusana(t)
Julkaisutyyppi
Toimiala
Laatija
Päivämäärä

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

16-05-2019

The prohibition of discrimination, and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as grounds of discrimination. However, the scope of the provisions dealing with this issue is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare ...

The prohibition of discrimination, and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as grounds of discrimination. However, the scope of the provisions dealing with this issue is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship, or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies, and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is a further updated version of a Briefing originally drafted by Piotr Bakowski. The previous edition was published in June 2018.

LGBTI in Africa: Widespread discrimination against people with non-conforming sexual orientations and gender identities

16-05-2019

Three out of five African countries have laws criminalising homosexuality and the public expression of sexual or gender behaviour that does not conform with heterosexual norms. These same laws even sometimes punish LGBTI (lesbian, gay, trans, intersex) rights advocacy. Some African countries have partly decriminalised LGBTI persons or given them better protection. However, across the continent – with the notable exception of South Africa – such persons are still far from fully enjoying the same rights ...

Three out of five African countries have laws criminalising homosexuality and the public expression of sexual or gender behaviour that does not conform with heterosexual norms. These same laws even sometimes punish LGBTI (lesbian, gay, trans, intersex) rights advocacy. Some African countries have partly decriminalised LGBTI persons or given them better protection. However, across the continent – with the notable exception of South Africa – such persons are still far from fully enjoying the same rights as other citizens. Furthermore, recent years have seen the emergence of a worrying trend: the adoption of tougher legislation coupled with clampdowns on homosexuals. An argument frequently used in support of discriminatory legislative and other measures targeting LGBTI persons is that non-conforming sexual orientations and gender identities were brought to Africa by Western colonisers and are contrary to the 'African values'. This claim has long been proven false by academic research, but tolerance for LGBTI is still very low in most African countries, and LGBTI people are all too often exposed to discrimination and violence. Against this backdrop, the EU institutions and Member States have a difficult task: on the one hand, they are committed under the Treaties to promote the EU core values in their external relations, and to monitor and tackle abuses in their partner countries. On the other hand, their actions and declarations in this area risk reinforcing the perception that the EU is trying to impose non-African values on Africa, all the more so since the notion of sexual orientation and gender identity as grounds for discrimination is contested by African countries in the multilateral arena.

Towards an EU Roadmap for Equality on Grounds of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

15-10-2012

This study presents an overview of problems faced by LGBTI persons as identified in EU studies, along with EU actions taken in this area to date. It focuses in particular on the areas of Equality (including in the fields of employment, health, education, access to goods and services and housing); specific trans and intersex issues; diverse families and freedom of movement; freedom of assembly and expression; hate speech, hate crime and violence; and fleeing homophobia and transphobia. Based on these ...

This study presents an overview of problems faced by LGBTI persons as identified in EU studies, along with EU actions taken in this area to date. It focuses in particular on the areas of Equality (including in the fields of employment, health, education, access to goods and services and housing); specific trans and intersex issues; diverse families and freedom of movement; freedom of assembly and expression; hate speech, hate crime and violence; and fleeing homophobia and transphobia. Based on these findings, it proposes recommendations with a timeline which could be included in a roadmap for equality on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

Vanessa Leigh (MILIEU Ltd.), Levent Altan (MILIEU Ltd.), Jordan Long, with the participation of Evelyne Paradis (ILGA)

The European Union and rights of LGBT people

14-05-2010

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbians, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised by EU law as grounds of discrimination; the scope of protection is however limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare education and access to goods ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbians, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised by EU law as grounds of discrimination; the scope of protection is however limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare education and access to goods and services – areas where LGBT people are often discriminated against. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. But it remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law.

Tulevat tapahtumat

20-01-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable with the World Bank: Where next for the global economy
Muu tapahtuma -
EPRS
25-01-2021
Public Hearing on "Gender aspects of precarious work"
Kuulemistilaisuus -
FEMM
26-01-2021
Public hearing on Co-management of EU fisheries at local level
Kuulemistilaisuus -
PECH

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