14

tulos(ta)

Hakusana(t)
Julkaisutyyppi
Toimiala
Laatija
Hakusana
Päivämäärä

Migrant seasonal workers in the European agricultural sector

26-02-2021

The EU fruit and vegetable sector is heavily dependent on a non-national labour force, either from other EU Member States or third countries. Germany, Italy, Spain, France and Poland, in particular, employ high numbers of migrant seasonal farm workers. While these numbers have been steadily increasing, they compensate only partly for the ongoing decline in national agricultural workforces. Migrant seasonal workers from the EU are entitled to fully equal treatment with nationals of the host country ...

The EU fruit and vegetable sector is heavily dependent on a non-national labour force, either from other EU Member States or third countries. Germany, Italy, Spain, France and Poland, in particular, employ high numbers of migrant seasonal farm workers. While these numbers have been steadily increasing, they compensate only partly for the ongoing decline in national agricultural workforces. Migrant seasonal workers from the EU are entitled to fully equal treatment with nationals of the host country under the fundamental right to the free movement of workers within the EU, whereas third-country nationals are covered by the Seasonal Workers Directive of 2014, which grants them equal treatment as regards terms of employment and some social benefits. EU Member States manage their own seasonal worker schemes depending on the needs of the domestic labour market, their ties with third countries and their broader immigration system. The reality of seasonal agricultural work is a harsh one, with generally poor working and living conditions. Undocumented migrants, but also legal ones, can fall victim to illegal gang-master practices or even modern forms of slavery. Exploitation of women occurs in certain regions. The coronavirus pandemic, which disrupted harvests in the spring of 2020 as seasonal workers faced travel restrictions, also highlighted their essential role in EU agriculture and laid bare their sometimes appalling working and living conditions. Reacting to this situation, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on the protection of seasonal workers in June 2020, calling on Member States to ensure proper implementation of the relevant EU legislation and on the European Commission to issue new specific guidelines and propose long-term solutions to fight abusive practices and protect victims. In July 2020, the Commission responded to this call by issuing new guidelines on the protection of seasonal workers in the context of the pandemic, announcing further action, including ongoing work with the European Labour Authority.

Professional qualifications in inland navigation

08-11-2017

As part of its efforts to reduce transport emissions, the EU wants to make better use of inland navigation. This requires addressing the limited labour mobility and shortage of qualified workers in the sector. The proposed directive seeks to establish one competence-based system of qualifications for workers on all EU inland waterways. Ultimately, the new rules aim to make jobs in inland navigation more attractive. Parliament is due to vote on the proposal in plenary in November.

As part of its efforts to reduce transport emissions, the EU wants to make better use of inland navigation. This requires addressing the limited labour mobility and shortage of qualified workers in the sector. The proposed directive seeks to establish one competence-based system of qualifications for workers on all EU inland waterways. Ultimately, the new rules aim to make jobs in inland navigation more attractive. Parliament is due to vote on the proposal in plenary in November.

Migration and the EU: A long-term perspective

19-05-2016

Policy debate on migration understandably focuses on short-term challenges and costs, given the refugee wave that arrived in the EU in 2015. This briefing by contrast addresses challenges and opportunities for the EU of migration in the long term, and builds on foresight work within the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS). It identifies three areas which call for robust policy responses, at different levels, in the period to 2030 and beyond: demographic change and its implications ...

Policy debate on migration understandably focuses on short-term challenges and costs, given the refugee wave that arrived in the EU in 2015. This briefing by contrast addresses challenges and opportunities for the EU of migration in the long term, and builds on foresight work within the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS). It identifies three areas which call for robust policy responses, at different levels, in the period to 2030 and beyond: demographic change and its implications for the supply of labour; the integration of migrants; and the international dimension of migration, including the prevention and management of refugee crises. The underlying assumption is that anticipatory policy (management by foresight) is preferable to, and more effective than, responsive policy (crisis management). Because the challenges posed by migration cross many sectoral and institutional boundaries, a comprehensive and coordinated response is needed. This in turn underlines the case for shared and strategic policy analysis across the EU institutions. Continual dialogue, sharing many different perspectives and with a focus on the medium and long term, is a path towards a common understanding of both challenges and choices.     

Towards a Digital Single Market Act

11-01-2016

In May 2015, the Commission adopted a strategic proposal entitled 'A Digital Single Market Strategy for Europe', comprising 16 legislative and non-legislative initiatives to be delivered by the end of 2016. A report by the Committees on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) and on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), elaborating on the Strategy and its impact on society and economy, is due to be discussed in plenary in January.

In May 2015, the Commission adopted a strategic proposal entitled 'A Digital Single Market Strategy for Europe', comprising 16 legislative and non-legislative initiatives to be delivered by the end of 2016. A report by the Committees on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) and on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), elaborating on the Strategy and its impact on society and economy, is due to be discussed in plenary in January.

Matching skills and jobs in the European Union

05-01-2016

Skills mismatch (the discrepancy between workers' skills and labour market needs) is not only a problem encountered by jobseekers; it also affects employees working in positions below their levels of qualification or outside their fields of study, and concerns some groups of older workers that face difficulties in keeping their skills up to date. According to studies, various solutions include adapting education and training more closely to labour market needs; providing flexible arrangements and ...

Skills mismatch (the discrepancy between workers' skills and labour market needs) is not only a problem encountered by jobseekers; it also affects employees working in positions below their levels of qualification or outside their fields of study, and concerns some groups of older workers that face difficulties in keeping their skills up to date. According to studies, various solutions include adapting education and training more closely to labour market needs; providing flexible arrangements and appropriate facilities at the workplace; and enhancing labour mobility and lifelong learning. In order to better understand skills mismatch, the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (Cedefop) carried out in 2014 the first pan-European skills survey, the initial results of which were published in October 2015. The European Union (EU) is dealing with the issue of skills mismatch in different ways, particularly by making recommendations to national and/or local authorities responsible for labour markets or for the content of education and training; enhancing the mobility of workers, for example through deepening international cooperation; implementing Community instruments such as the job search platform EURES; and facilitating the matching of skills and jobs through EU funding.

Employment and Skills Aspects of the Digital Single Market Strategy

16-11-2015

The ongoing and anticipated impact of digitalisation and the digital single market not only provides opportunities, but also presents challenges in terms of the job dynamics and changes in working conditions. The net effects of digitalisation on employment are ambiguous, but job losses in certain sectors are inevitable. Classic employer-employee relationships are also under pressure. The transformation of jobs calls for different skills requirements which could lead to growing skill gaps and mismatch ...

The ongoing and anticipated impact of digitalisation and the digital single market not only provides opportunities, but also presents challenges in terms of the job dynamics and changes in working conditions. The net effects of digitalisation on employment are ambiguous, but job losses in certain sectors are inevitable. Classic employer-employee relationships are also under pressure. The transformation of jobs calls for different skills requirements which could lead to growing skill gaps and mismatch in the labour market.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

Daphne Valsamis (IDEA Consult)

Labour Market Shortages in the European Union

22-09-2015

Employment and Social Affairs Committee requested a study on Labour market Shortages in the European Union to provide a comprehensive overview of labour shortages in the European Union as there is evidence that in many countries considerable unemployment coexists with difficult to fill vacancies. This study analyses the different types and causes of labour shortages, their occurrence within the EU-28 and lists possible solutions for employers, Member States and the European Union to counter these ...

Employment and Social Affairs Committee requested a study on Labour market Shortages in the European Union to provide a comprehensive overview of labour shortages in the European Union as there is evidence that in many countries considerable unemployment coexists with difficult to fill vacancies. This study analyses the different types and causes of labour shortages, their occurrence within the EU-28 and lists possible solutions for employers, Member States and the European Union to counter these labour shortages. The study includes a number of cases studies on good practices developed in different Member States. This leaflet presents the key findings of the study.

Third-country migration and European labour markets: Integrating foreigners

16-07-2015

The EU faces long-term economic challenges. Its population is ageing, and its economy is increasingly dependent on jobs requiring high levels of skills. Therefore, during the last ten years, the EU has come to consider managed migration as an increasingly important way to provide European economies with the talent they need. Managing legal migration and integrating third-country nationals has significantly evolved in that time, following a sectoral approach. Several new legal instruments have been ...

The EU faces long-term economic challenges. Its population is ageing, and its economy is increasingly dependent on jobs requiring high levels of skills. Therefore, during the last ten years, the EU has come to consider managed migration as an increasingly important way to provide European economies with the talent they need. Managing legal migration and integrating third-country nationals has significantly evolved in that time, following a sectoral approach. Several new legal instruments have been introduced – most importantly, the Single Permit and the Blue Card Directive, in 2011 and 2009 respectively – in order to facilitate permanent residence and assist in attracting highly skilled workers. The European Union's 'Stockholm Programme' of 2009, and the Commission's 'European Agenda for the Integration of Third-country nationals' of 2011, both pointed to the most crucial element in the successful integration of migrants being their participation in the labour market. Since then, the situation has improved in only a few Member States. Recent data confirm the persistent disadvantages for third-country nationals manifested in their employment and unemployment rates.

Proceedings of the Workshop on the Impact of the Crisis on Skills Shortages

15-07-2015

A workshop on "The impact of the crisis on skills shortages" was held in the European Parliament in Brussels on 23 March 2015. This Policy Department A document contains the programme, a summary of discussions, background papers and the presentations of that workshop.

A workshop on "The impact of the crisis on skills shortages" was held in the European Parliament in Brussels on 23 March 2015. This Policy Department A document contains the programme, a summary of discussions, background papers and the presentations of that workshop.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

Paul de Beer, Maarten Gerard and Anja Meierkoord (Idea consult) ; Konstantinos Pouliakas (Cedefop) ; John Mc Grath (SOLAS) ; Solveigh Hieronimus (McKinsey & Company)

The Added Value of EU policy in Education: European Added Value in Action

18-03-2015

In recent years, the EU has developed a European dimension to education, notably in the area of higher education, where it has stimulated mobility of students and teachers. In the last two decades, major progress has also been made in harmonizing university degree structures and increasing the compatibility of higher education systems. The benefits of the support given to education at a Union level derive from the cross-border character of the activities in the field, which are additional to those ...

In recent years, the EU has developed a European dimension to education, notably in the area of higher education, where it has stimulated mobility of students and teachers. In the last two decades, major progress has also been made in harmonizing university degree structures and increasing the compatibility of higher education systems. The benefits of the support given to education at a Union level derive from the cross-border character of the activities in the field, which are additional to those developed at national or regional levels. It is worth noting that only EU programmes guarantee that all Member States benefit from mobility and exchange of good practices in the area while ensuring optimal dissemination of results. Hence, EU action in the ground is a way of filling in the missing links, avoiding fragmentation and realising the potential of a border-free Europe. In practical terms, the implementation of programmes by the EU offers better value for money and economies of scale - than a series of wholly bilateral relations between Member States in this field would allow- because externalities can be addressed, resources or expertise pooled, and action better coordinated. This ‘At a Glance’ publication is part of a series of summaries of the added value of existing EU policies in practice. Previous publications in this series include summaries of the benefits of the European single market and the added value of EU action in the field of mobile telephone roaming charges.

Tulevat tapahtumat

27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
Muu tapahtuma -
BECA
27-09-2021
US trade policy
Kuulemistilaisuus -
INTA
27-09-2021
Consumer protection and automated decision-making tools in a modern economy
Kuulemistilaisuus -
IMCO

Kumppanit