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Publié le 05-05-2021

Current membership of the European Council

05-05-2021

The European Council consists of the 27 Heads of State or Government of the EU Member States, who are voting members, together with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission, who have no vote (Article 15(2) TEU). The chart shows the current members, the national office they hold and their political affiliation, as well as the year their membership of the institution began. This publication is updated periodically to reflect changes in the European Council's ...

The European Council consists of the 27 Heads of State or Government of the EU Member States, who are voting members, together with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission, who have no vote (Article 15(2) TEU). The chart shows the current members, the national office they hold and their political affiliation, as well as the year their membership of the institution began. This publication is updated periodically to reflect changes in the European Council's membership.

Revision of the Schengen Evaluation and Monitoring Mechanism

05-05-2021

As a component of the Schengen Strategy that the European Commission intends to adopt in 2021, the revision of regulation (EU) No 1053/2013 will aim at making the Schengen Evaluation and Monitoring Mechanism more efficient, by revising current practices - for example, by shortening the adoption processes of the evaluation reports and recommendations, and ensuring a timely follow-up by Member States.

As a component of the Schengen Strategy that the European Commission intends to adopt in 2021, the revision of regulation (EU) No 1053/2013 will aim at making the Schengen Evaluation and Monitoring Mechanism more efficient, by revising current practices - for example, by shortening the adoption processes of the evaluation reports and recommendations, and ensuring a timely follow-up by Member States.

Publié le 04-05-2021

Histoire de l’hymne européen

04-05-2021

Dès l’entre-deux-guerres, des militants en faveur de l’unité européenne se sont interrogés sur le choix d’un hymne qui pourrait traduire le sentiment d’appartenance à une communauté de destin et le partage de valeurs communes. La création du Conseil de l’Europe en 1949 suscite de nombreuses vocations. Les projets spontanés de partitions et de paroles pour un hymne européen se multiplient. Ce n’est qu’en 1972 que le Conseil de l’Europe adopte officiellement le prélude de l’Ode à la joie extrait de ...

Dès l’entre-deux-guerres, des militants en faveur de l’unité européenne se sont interrogés sur le choix d’un hymne qui pourrait traduire le sentiment d’appartenance à une communauté de destin et le partage de valeurs communes. La création du Conseil de l’Europe en 1949 suscite de nombreuses vocations. Les projets spontanés de partitions et de paroles pour un hymne européen se multiplient. Ce n’est qu’en 1972 que le Conseil de l’Europe adopte officiellement le prélude de l’Ode à la joie extrait de la Neuvième symphonie de Beethoven comme hymne européen. Du côté de ce qui deviendra l’Union européenne, les institutions saisissent l’occasion des débats sur le thème de l’Europe des citoyens, au milieu des années 1980, pour adopter, elles aussi, l’Ode à la joie comme hymne. Le 29 mai 1986, une cérémonie à Bruxelles consacre officiellement l’adoption du drapeau et de l’hymne européens. Bien que choisi dans une version sans paroles, cet hymne symbolise désormais l’Union européenne. Il est joué lors des cérémonies officielles auxquelles l’Union européenne ou ses dirigeants participent et, d’une manière générale, lors de la plupart des événements à caractère européen.

The informal economy and coronavirus in Latin America

04-05-2021

The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in Latin America's worst economic and social crisis in decades, with a disproportionate impact on informal workers. The informal economy describes economic activity by workers or economic units that is not or only insufficiently covered by formal legal or practical arrangements. Although it is on the decline in Latin America, the informal economy still accounts for slightly over half of all jobs in the region. To counteract the spread of Covid-19, various confinement ...

The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in Latin America's worst economic and social crisis in decades, with a disproportionate impact on informal workers. The informal economy describes economic activity by workers or economic units that is not or only insufficiently covered by formal legal or practical arrangements. Although it is on the decline in Latin America, the informal economy still accounts for slightly over half of all jobs in the region. To counteract the spread of Covid-19, various confinement measures were implemented in Latin American countries. These lockdowns have had a substantial effect on earnings in the informal economy, some estimations show income contraction of up to 80 %. By its very nature, the informal economy leaves workers vulnerable to external shocks. Inadequate or non-existent social safety nets mean that income losses can quickly lead to poverty or death. Despite several Latin American countries being classified as high- or upper middle-income countries, large parts of the region's inhabitants lack access to health care. For those who do have access, out-of-pocket expenses are high. Furthermore, many public hospitals are overstrained and lack the qualified staff to deal with a health crisis. The pre-existing levels of high inequality have been aggravated since the start of the pandemic. Various economic and social policy responses have been implemented to alleviate the current circumstances. Nevertheless, limited fiscal space and a lack of state capacity weakens the effectiveness of such policies. The situation is worsened by an expected slow economic recovery: estimates project a return to pre-pandemic levels of aggregate output only by the end of 2023. The European Union has pledged €918 million to support the region under the Team Europe package.

Research for CULT Committee - The Situation of Artists and Cultural Workers and the post-COVID Cultural Recovery in the European Union : Policy Recommendations Concomitant expertise for INI report

04-05-2021

The following recommendations present medium- and long-term policy solutions to address the needs identified in the Background Analysis “The Situation of Artists and Cultural Workers and the post-COVID Cultural Recovery in the European Union”. Its aim is to provide guidelines and principles to structure the contents of the European Framework, and hence improve the situation and working conditions of artists and cultural workers in the EU.

The following recommendations present medium- and long-term policy solutions to address the needs identified in the Background Analysis “The Situation of Artists and Cultural Workers and the post-COVID Cultural Recovery in the European Union”. Its aim is to provide guidelines and principles to structure the contents of the European Framework, and hence improve the situation and working conditions of artists and cultural workers in the EU.

Auteur externe

Mafalda DÂMASO, Culture Action Europe

Research for CULT Committee - Education and youth in post-COVID-19 Europe - crisis effects and policy recommendations

04-05-2021

This paper demonstrates that the COVID-19 pandemic posed unprecedented and multidimensional challenges to the education systems and youth sector, revealing the lack of preparedness in terms of crisis management and digital education responses, as well as reinforcing structural weaknesses of education delivery. Given that various sectors of education and the youth sector faced distinct challenges, there are valuable lessons to be learnt from policy responses and best practices across Europe. The common ...

This paper demonstrates that the COVID-19 pandemic posed unprecedented and multidimensional challenges to the education systems and youth sector, revealing the lack of preparedness in terms of crisis management and digital education responses, as well as reinforcing structural weaknesses of education delivery. Given that various sectors of education and the youth sector faced distinct challenges, there are valuable lessons to be learnt from policy responses and best practices across Europe. The common goal should be to build more resilient education systems, which are responsive and adaptive to future crises.

Auteur externe

Public Policy and Management Institute: Loes VAN DER GRAAF, Jekatyerina DUNAJEVA, Hanna SIAROVA, Radvile BANKAUSKAITE

Publié le 03-05-2021

The six policy priorities of the von der Leyen Commission: State of play in spring 2021

03-05-2021

This EPRS paper analyses progress in attaining the policy agenda set out by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, and her College of Commissioners when they took office in December 2019. It looks in particular at the state of play in respect of delivery on the six key priorities asserted at that time and at how they have since been affected by the impact of the coronavirus crisis. The evidence so far suggests that, rather than undermine their original agenda or knock it badly ...

This EPRS paper analyses progress in attaining the policy agenda set out by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, and her College of Commissioners when they took office in December 2019. It looks in particular at the state of play in respect of delivery on the six key priorities asserted at that time and at how they have since been affected by the impact of the coronavirus crisis. The evidence so far suggests that, rather than undermine their original agenda or knock it badly off course, the Commission has been able to use the momentum of events to assert the increased relevance of their priorities – especially in the climate action and digital fields – and to operationalise them further through the €750 billion 'Next Generation EU' (NGEU) recovery fund. Concretely, EPRS finds that of the nearly 400 legislative and non-legislative initiatives foreshadowed by the von der Leyen Commission on taking office or since (397), almost half have already been submitted (192). Of these, one in five has already been adopted (43), while the great majority of the remainder are either proceeding normally in the legislative process (97) or are close to adoption (26). Conversely, a certain number of proposals are proceeding very slowly or are currently blocked (26).

President Biden's climate summit

03-05-2021

On 22 and 23 April 2021, United States (US) President Joe Biden convened a virtual summit of 40 world leaders in a bid to galvanise global efforts to address the climate crisis. There he announced new targets of cutting US net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 'between 26 and 28 %' by 2025, and by 'between 50 and 52 %' by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. Biden also announced initiatives to help developing countries decarbonise, and encouraged other countries to match US ambition. The summit, one ...

On 22 and 23 April 2021, United States (US) President Joe Biden convened a virtual summit of 40 world leaders in a bid to galvanise global efforts to address the climate crisis. There he announced new targets of cutting US net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 'between 26 and 28 %' by 2025, and by 'between 50 and 52 %' by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. Biden also announced initiatives to help developing countries decarbonise, and encouraged other countries to match US ambition. The summit, one of a number of events leading up to the (delayed) 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow (United Kingdom) in November 2021, prompted several other countries to pledge new targets. The EU has welcomed the new US targets, but questions remain about their level of ambition and feasibility.

Matching priorities and resources in the EU budget: Climate action, migration and borders

03-05-2021

Over the past two decades, the European Union (EU) has been entrusted with a growing number of objectives and responsibilities. However, ensuring financing of related activities through the EU budget has often proven problematic, as this has long been capped at around 1 % of the Union's gross national income (GNI). During the preparation of the post-2020 EU multiannual financial framework (MFF), climate action, migration and border management were identified among the emerging priorities that required ...

Over the past two decades, the European Union (EU) has been entrusted with a growing number of objectives and responsibilities. However, ensuring financing of related activities through the EU budget has often proven problematic, as this has long been capped at around 1 % of the Union's gross national income (GNI). During the preparation of the post-2020 EU multiannual financial framework (MFF), climate action, migration and border management were identified among the emerging priorities that required increased joint action and funding. The agreement on EU finances for 2021 to 2027 provides for a significant relative increase in the financial resources devoted to these policy areas. In absolute figures, the reinforcements are stronger for climate action than for migration and borders. Underpinned by the European Green Deal strategy, climate action will receive the bulk of its resources through the incorporation of climate considerations and objectives across all relevant EU funding instruments (climate mainstreaming). Next Generation EU (NGEU), the temporary instrument to aid recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, will play a major role in the boost to climate-relevant resources. In total, these could amount to some €550 billion (in 2018 prices, corresponding to 30 % of total MFF and NGEU resources). For the first time, migration and border management have a dedicated heading, accounting for 2.1 % of MFF resources. Among other activities, additional allocations will contribute to the agreed reinforcement of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency. Opinion surveys show that respondents see climate change and migration among the main global challenges for the EU, but there are gaps between perceptions and expectations of the role of the EU budget in these two domains. The European Parliament, which is a strong advocate of a robust EU budget commensurate with the Union's responsibilities, managed to secure additional resources for instruments relevant to both groups of policies, as well as the enhancement of the climate mainstreaming methodology. The Parliament plays a key role in shaping and scrutinising how the funding allocated to the policy areas is implemented. Other measures to reinforce the EU budget's capacity to deliver in the areas of climate action, migration and borders seek to improve synergies between budgetary instruments.

Communicating and perceiving the EU budget: Challenges and outcomes

03-05-2021

This analysis presents the EU budget as a subject of communication, while also outlining its importance for the perception of the EU's democratic legitimacy and the challenges involved in presenting it to the citizens. Currently, there are more Europeans supporting a bigger EU budget than ever before (48 %), and the distribution of opinions cannot be explained simply by identifying them as belonging to the group of the net beneficiaries or that of the net contributors. Citizens' perceptions and desires ...

This analysis presents the EU budget as a subject of communication, while also outlining its importance for the perception of the EU's democratic legitimacy and the challenges involved in presenting it to the citizens. Currently, there are more Europeans supporting a bigger EU budget than ever before (48 %), and the distribution of opinions cannot be explained simply by identifying them as belonging to the group of the net beneficiaries or that of the net contributors. Citizens' perceptions and desires regarding EU budget spending priorities are very different. Moreover, their perceptions are rather different from the actual EU spending priorities as well. The size and scope of the EU budget, budgetary cycles and timelines, revenue and expenditure structures, performance, different EU and national, institutional and political actors – these are all factors influencing the way citizens understand and relate to the EU budget. Some recent changes, such as the increased focus on results in budgetary reporting and the reform of the system of own resources, have the potential to contribute positively to the EU budget communication and to make it more comprehensible to citizens.

Evénements à venir

10-05-2021
Lessons from a public health crisis: Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer care
Audition -
BECA
10-05-2021
ENVI Public Hearing on new genomic techniques in the food sector
Audition -
ENVI
10-05-2021
Public hearing on the EU long-term strategy towards Russia
Audition -
AFET

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