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his in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, looks at the use of data for the purpose of regulatory assessment/evaluation. The author finds that data is needed to support evidence-based regulation, that information technologies, and in particular AI, can enable a more extensive and beneficial use of data, and that the use of data in ex-post evaluations can improve the regulatory ...

This paper summarises the findings and provides some further details of the replies received from a survey on the involvement of national parliaments in scrutinising the implementation of Recovery and Resilience Facility, notably the Recovery and Resilience Plans at the national level. This survey aimed to keep stock of whether and how EU national parliaments are involved in the implementation of the RRF. It was addressed directly to EU national parliament services and reflected developments in the ...

This In-Depth Analysis, requested by the European Parliament's LIBE Committee - Democracy Rule of Law and Fundamental Rights Monitoring Group, examines the situation of Democracy, the Rule of Law and Fundamental Rights in Greece and how Article 2 TEU values are respected and implemented in the country, focusing on anti-corruption measures and issues related to media freedom.

This research paper explores the opportunities and challenges faced by the EU from the rapid emergence of new technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Analytics and Blockchain in the area of taxation .These technologies enable a transformation of the way that tax administration interact with taxpayers and can move tax compliance into real time. At the same time they raise practical and legal challenges for both the Member States and the European Union. This document was ...

An increasing number of politicians and analysts argue that the European Union should boost its ‘strategic autonomy’ and/or develop a higher degree of ‘European sovereignty’. These concepts encompass a greater potential for independence, self-reliance and resilience in a wide range of fields – such as defence, trade, industrial policy, digital policy, economic and monetary policy, and health policy – following a series of events in recent years that have exposed Europe’s vulnerability to external ...

Nearly two months ago, on 20 January, Joseph Biden was sworn in as the 46th President of the United States, at the end of perhaps the most divisive electoral processes in his country's history. The new President's supporters and advocates, including many in Europe, are counting on him to set a new course for the US in global politics, moving to firm up and advance the multilateral, rules-based world order and rekindle America's traditional alliances, notably within the NATO framework. Very high hopes ...

This paper illustrates and discusses the monetary policies activated in response to the COVID-19 crisis. We argue that these policy measures have stabilised the European economic and financial system by incentivising banks’ lending to households and businesses and by indirectly creating short-term fiscal capacity also for those Member States of the euro area that have a very high government debt/GDP ratio. This paper was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life ...

Over recent years, the members of the European Council have, in a number of landmark declarations such as the Bratislava Declaration, pointed to the need to improve communication with citizens, as part of the process of building greater trust and confidence in the European Union and its institutions. As social media, and notably Twitter, have become an important part of politicians' communication strategy generally, this study looks specifically at how EU leaders in the European Council communicate ...

EU banks entered the coronavirus crisis with high capital and liquidity buffers resulting from the reforms undertaken after the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. This allowed a bold and swift response by supervisors oriented towards supporting banks’ ability to provide credit to the real economy. This paper provides an overview and an assessment of the regulatory response to the crisis, and suggests some recommendations for the future design of countercyclical regulation.

We analyse the recent policy decisions made by the ECB and the national authorities related to capital, liquidity, and shareholders’ remuneration aimed at promoting credit supply from the banking sector to the coronavirus-afflicted economy. We forecast the impact of the regulatory decisions based on the empirical literature, discuss the factors that reduce the banks’ incentives to expand loan portfolios and develop policy suggestions intended to mitigate the effect of these factors.