22

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

Coronavirus and prisons in the EU: Member-State measures to reduce spread of the virus

22-06-2020

The coronavirus crisis has put huge pressure on European prisons, already often affected by chronic overcrowding and poor healthcare services. Ensuring strict sanitary conditions, adequate health monitoring and the necessary distancing to prevent an outbreak in these closed environments − particularly vulnerable to contagion − has been a considerable challenge for most, if not all EU Member States. Starting from March 2020, as lockdowns and states of emergency gradually came into force across Europe ...

The coronavirus crisis has put huge pressure on European prisons, already often affected by chronic overcrowding and poor healthcare services. Ensuring strict sanitary conditions, adequate health monitoring and the necessary distancing to prevent an outbreak in these closed environments − particularly vulnerable to contagion − has been a considerable challenge for most, if not all EU Member States. Starting from March 2020, as lockdowns and states of emergency gradually came into force across Europe, EU Member States have taken a number of containment measures to protect prisoners' health. These measures have consisted mostly of suspending all visits and regular activities in order to limit contacts among detainees and also between detainees and the outside world. Transfers of prisoners between EU countries have been put on hold as well. Improved sanitary measures have been taken in detention centres, in terms of both personal hygiene and cleanliness of premises. At the same time, several Member States have sought to reduce overcrowding, by limiting entries and increasing exits, for instance by postponing the execution of sentences or using alternatives to detention. However, according to the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, at least half the Member States did not seek alternatives to detention. This briefing looks into the various measures adopted by Member States between early March and the end of May 2020 in response to the challenges posed to the Union's prisons by the coronavirus crisis. While, at the time of writing, containment measures in many Member States are gradually being eased, the long-term impact of the pandemic on prison conditions and populations remains to be seen.

Understanding EU data protection policy

20-05-2020

The near-ubiquity of data in the lives of ordinary people, along with its exponential growth in generation rate and potential misuse, has made the protection of personal information an increasingly important social, legal and political matter for the EU. In recent years, both awareness of data rights and expectations for EU action in this area have grown considerably. The right to privacy and the right to protection of personal data are both enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU ...

The near-ubiquity of data in the lives of ordinary people, along with its exponential growth in generation rate and potential misuse, has made the protection of personal information an increasingly important social, legal and political matter for the EU. In recent years, both awareness of data rights and expectations for EU action in this area have grown considerably. The right to privacy and the right to protection of personal data are both enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU and the EU Treaties. The entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in 2009 gave the Charter the same legal value as the Treaties and abolished the pillar structure, providing a stronger basis for a more effective and comprehensive data protection regime in the EU. In 2012, the European Commission launched an ambitious reform to modernise the EU data protection framework. It resulted in the adoption in 2016 of the main EU data protection legislative instrument – the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – and the Law Enforcement Directive. The framework overhaul also included adopting an updated Regulation on Data Processing in the EU Institutions and reforming the ePrivacy Directive, pending in the Council since September 2017. The European Parliament has played a major role in passing these reforms, both as co-legislator and author of own-initiative reports and resolutions seeking to guarantee a high level of data protection to EU citizens. Last but not least, the European Court of Justice has also played an important part in building the EU data protection framework, with several landmark judgments delivered in recent years. In the coming years, potential challenges to the data protection framework include the question of how to adapt the GDPR to emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, facial recognition technology and the Internet of Things. Potential fragmentation issues include differing Member State interpretations of consent for data processing, while compliance burdens for SMEs and insufficient resources for data protection authorities may present challenges for enforcement. The European Commission is expected to address these issues in its upcoming evaluation of the GDPR.

States of emergency in response to the coronavirus crisis: Situation in certain Member States II

13-05-2020

Member States have adopted a range of emergency measures in response to the unprecedented public health crises generated by the coronavirus pandemic. Whereas not all Member States dispose of constitutional mechanisms to enable the declaration of a 'state of emergency', all have taken exceptional and far-reaching emergency measures that affect citizens' rights and freedoms as well as democratic processes. These institutional changes and the restrictions imposed on citizens' lives pose significant ...

Member States have adopted a range of emergency measures in response to the unprecedented public health crises generated by the coronavirus pandemic. Whereas not all Member States dispose of constitutional mechanisms to enable the declaration of a 'state of emergency', all have taken exceptional and far-reaching emergency measures that affect citizens' rights and freedoms as well as democratic processes. These institutional changes and the restrictions imposed on citizens' lives pose significant institutional and democratic challenges. Given their impact on fundamental rights and freedoms and on the normal functioning of democracy, emergency measures need to be carefully examined, matched with adequate legal safeguards, and subject to close democratic scrutiny. This is particularly true in the context of rapid changes of circumstances and in view of new evidence about the evolution of the crisis and its implications. This briefing covers the following countries: Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Malta, Austria, Romania, and Slovenia. It focuses on three key aspects: i) the constitutional framework of the state emergency or legitimation of the emergency legislation; ii) the concrete measures adopted; and iii) the extent of parliamentary oversight exercised on the adopted measures. This briefing is the second in a series aimed at providing a comparative overview of Member States' institutional responses to the coronavirus crisis. The first in the series covered an initial set of seven Member States.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Margaritis Schinas – Vice-President: Promoting the European way of life

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Didier Reynders - Justice

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens: La lutte contre le terrorisme

28-06-2019

Confrontée à la menace croissante du terrorisme international, l’Union européenne joue un rôle toujours plus ambitieux dans la lutte contre le terrorisme. Si la responsabilité en matière de lutte contre la criminalité et de sécurité incombe en premier lieu aux États membres, l’Union offre des instruments de coopération, de coordination et (dans une certaine mesure) d’harmonisation, ainsi qu’un soutien financier, pour faire face à un phénomène qui ne connaît pas de frontières. Par ailleurs, l’hypothèse ...

Confrontée à la menace croissante du terrorisme international, l’Union européenne joue un rôle toujours plus ambitieux dans la lutte contre le terrorisme. Si la responsabilité en matière de lutte contre la criminalité et de sécurité incombe en premier lieu aux États membres, l’Union offre des instruments de coopération, de coordination et (dans une certaine mesure) d’harmonisation, ainsi qu’un soutien financier, pour faire face à un phénomène qui ne connaît pas de frontières. Par ailleurs, l’hypothèse selon laquelle il existe un lien entre le développement et la stabilité, ainsi qu’entre la sécurité intérieure et la sécurité extérieure, dicte désormais l’action de l’Union au-delà de ses propres frontières. Les dépenses de l’Union dans le domaine de la lutte contre le terrorisme ont augmenté au fil des années et sont appelées à croître à l’avenir en vue d’améliorer la coopération entre les autorités répressives nationales et de renforcer le soutien fourni par les organes de l’Union responsables de la sécurité, tels que l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour la coopération des services répressifs (Europol) et l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour la gestion opérationnelle des systèmes d’information à grande échelle au sein de l’espace de liberté, de sécurité et de justice (eu-LISA). Les fonds alloués à la coopération avec les pays tiers ont également été revus à la hausse, y compris au moyen de l’instrument contribuant à la stabilité et à la paix. L’objet des nombreux instruments et règles adoptés depuis 2014 va de l’harmonisation des définitions des infractions terroristes et des peines y afférentes à l’échange d’informations et de données, en passant par la protection des frontières, le financement de la lutte contre le terrorisme et l’adoption d’une réglementation sur les armes à feu. Pour évaluer l’efficacité des outils existants et mettre en évidence les lacunes et les éventuelles voies à suivre, le Parlement européen a mis en place une commission spéciale sur le terrorisme (TERR), qui a rendu son rapport en novembre 2018. La commission TERR a formulé des recommandations poussées invitant à prendre des mesures immédiates ou à plus long terme pour prévenir le terrorisme, s’attaquer à ses causes profondes, protéger les citoyens de l’Union et aider les victimes du mieux qui soit. Conformément à ces recommandations, les actions de l’Union en matière de lutte contre le terrorisme privilégieront très probablement la réponse aux menaces actuelles et futures, la lutte contre la radicalisation, y compris par la prévention de la diffusion de la propagande terroriste sur l’internet, ainsi que l’amélioration de la résilience des infrastructures critiques. Parmi les évolutions prévisibles figurent également l’intensification de l’échange d’informations, qui va de pair avec l’interopérabilité programmée des bases de données de l’Union liées à la sécurité et aux frontières, ainsi qu’avec la réalisation d’enquêtes sur les attaques terroristes commises sur le territoire de l’Union et la poursuite en justice de leurs auteurs, grâce à l’extension proposée du mandat du Parquet européen récemment créé. Le présent document est une mise à jour d’une note plus ancienne, publiée avant les élections européennes de 2019.

Interoperability between EU border and security information systems

14-06-2019

To enhance EU external border management and internal security, the European Commission has made several proposals to upgrade and expand European border and security information systems. As part of a broader process to maximise their use, the Commission presented legislative proposals for two regulations in December 2017 (amended in June 2018), establishing an interoperability framework between EU information systems on borders and visas, and on police and judicial cooperation, asylum and migration ...

To enhance EU external border management and internal security, the European Commission has made several proposals to upgrade and expand European border and security information systems. As part of a broader process to maximise their use, the Commission presented legislative proposals for two regulations in December 2017 (amended in June 2018), establishing an interoperability framework between EU information systems on borders and visas, and on police and judicial cooperation, asylum and migration. After completion of the legislative procedure at first reading in the Parliament and in the Council, the final acts were signed by the co-legislators on 20 May 2019 and published in the Official Journal two days later. Both acts came into force on 11 June 2019. The new rules aim to improve checks at the EU’s external borders, allow for better detection of security threats and identity fraud, and help in preventing and combating irregular migration. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Système européen d'information sur les casiers judiciaires

06-03-2019

Le Parlement européen doit voter en plénière au mois de mars au sujet de deux propositions législatives visant à moderniser le système européen d'information sur les casiers judiciaires (ECRIS). ECRIS permet aux juges et aux procureurs de demander des informations sur les antécédents judiciaires de tout ressortissant de l’Union européenne. Or, le système actuel ne permet pas d’accéder facilement aux informations relatives aux ressortissants de pays tiers qui ont été condamnés dans l’Union. Les nouvelles ...

Le Parlement européen doit voter en plénière au mois de mars au sujet de deux propositions législatives visant à moderniser le système européen d'information sur les casiers judiciaires (ECRIS). ECRIS permet aux juges et aux procureurs de demander des informations sur les antécédents judiciaires de tout ressortissant de l’Union européenne. Or, le système actuel ne permet pas d’accéder facilement aux informations relatives aux ressortissants de pays tiers qui ont été condamnés dans l’Union. Les nouvelles règles visent à remédier à ce problème.

Combattre le blanchiment de capitaux grâce au droit pénal

05-09-2018

Le blanchiment de capitaux constitue certes une infraction pénale dans tous les États membres de l’Union, mais sa définition et les sanctions encourues varient d’un pays à l’autre. Ceux qui enfreignent la loi peuvent tirer parti de ces différences, en effectuant leurs transactions financières dans les pays où les règles sont les moins sévères. Durant la session de septembre, le Parlement européen doit voter sur une proposition de nouvelle directive destinée à harmoniser les règles et les sanctions ...

Le blanchiment de capitaux constitue certes une infraction pénale dans tous les États membres de l’Union, mais sa définition et les sanctions encourues varient d’un pays à l’autre. Ceux qui enfreignent la loi peuvent tirer parti de ces différences, en effectuant leurs transactions financières dans les pays où les règles sont les moins sévères. Durant la session de septembre, le Parlement européen doit voter sur une proposition de nouvelle directive destinée à harmoniser les règles et les sanctions au sein de l’Union et à favoriser la coopération transfrontière afin de combattre le blanchiment de capitaux et le financement du terrorisme.

EYE event - Europe's fight against terror

16-05-2018

11 March 2019 will mark the 15th European Day of Remembrance of Victims of Terrorism, established to commemorate all victims of terror following the 2004 Madrid bombings, which left 191 people dead and around 2 000 injured. Since then, Europe has experienced several waves of terrorism and the European Union's policy response has evolved over the years, starting after 11 September 2001 and reaching cruising speed in 2015. What are the results of more than 15 years of EU counter-terrorism action? Is ...

11 March 2019 will mark the 15th European Day of Remembrance of Victims of Terrorism, established to commemorate all victims of terror following the 2004 Madrid bombings, which left 191 people dead and around 2 000 injured. Since then, Europe has experienced several waves of terrorism and the European Union's policy response has evolved over the years, starting after 11 September 2001 and reaching cruising speed in 2015. What are the results of more than 15 years of EU counter-terrorism action? Is there still room for further progress?

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