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résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

Offshore wind energy in Europe

30-10-2020

Offshore wind is a highly promising renewable energy source (RES) that could make a major contribution to global and European efforts to decarbonise the economy by 2050 and keep global warming to around 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, as set out in the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The European Commission expects the EU to produce at least 240 gigawatts (GW) of global offshore wind power capacity by 2050, while international organisations specialising in the energy field are even more optimistic ...

Offshore wind is a highly promising renewable energy source (RES) that could make a major contribution to global and European efforts to decarbonise the economy by 2050 and keep global warming to around 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, as set out in the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The European Commission expects the EU to produce at least 240 gigawatts (GW) of global offshore wind power capacity by 2050, while international organisations specialising in the energy field are even more optimistic about the prospects of this energy source. Europe accounts for 80 % of global offshore wind capacity and is the dominant region in terms of technologies and manufacturing. Offshore wind accounts for 210 000 jobs in Europe (over half of all jobs in wind energy), and this number should increase further with greater investment. Wind is the only offshore RES that is currently deployable on a commercial scale and there is vast untapped potential in the world's oceans and seas, even if only some potential sites can be developed. Offshore wind has a higher capacity and more consistent output than other variable RES, with the International Energy Agency describing it as a unique 'variable baseload' technology that could help to integrate the decarbonised energy systems of the future. A major constraint on offshore wind has been the difficulty of building fixed constructions in depths greater than 60 metres. Floating bases for offshore wind turbines could then prove to be a game changing technology, allowing much wider exploitation of wind resources. Many of the leading projects for commercialising these floating technologies are based in Europe. Hybrid projects linking offshore wind to other uses – such as hydrogen production or battery storage – represent another important avenue for offshore wind to contribute more widely to our energy systems. The Commission is expected to adopt a new strategy for offshore RES in 2020, proposing further EU action to scale up deployment of offshore wind and invest in its underlying technologies. Some EU Member States have set their own indicative targets for offshore wind deployment by 2030, accompanied by a range of support schemes. The European Parliament has been supportive of offshore wind energy, in particular the potential for a North Sea offshore grid (energy hub).

On the path to 'strategic autonomy': The EU in an evolving geopolitical environment

28-09-2020

In confronting the EU with an unprecedented crisis, the coronavirus outbreak is testing the bloc's unity, but may also accelerate the construction of EU strategic autonomy, as the roadmap for recovery is implemented. Political will, still in the making, and the capacity to act are key prerequisites for achieving effective European strategic autonomy. The EU is increasingly at risk of becoming a 'playground' for global powers in a world dominated by geopolitics. Building European strategic autonomy ...

In confronting the EU with an unprecedented crisis, the coronavirus outbreak is testing the bloc's unity, but may also accelerate the construction of EU strategic autonomy, as the roadmap for recovery is implemented. Political will, still in the making, and the capacity to act are key prerequisites for achieving effective European strategic autonomy. The EU is increasingly at risk of becoming a 'playground' for global powers in a world dominated by geopolitics. Building European strategic autonomy on a horizontal – cross-policy – basis would strengthen the EU's multilateral action and reduce dependence on external actors, to make the EU less vulnerable to external threats; while promoting a level playing field that benefits everyone. The EU could thus reap the full dividend of its integration and possibly benefit from greater economic gains. To build European strategic autonomy, the EU may choose to use the still 'under-used' or 'unused' potential of the Lisbon Treaty, with the European Council having a key role to play in triggering some of the Treaty provisions, particularly in foreign and security policy. European strategic autonomy may also result from a deepening of the EU integration process. Nevertheless, it remains to be seen whether the Member States will wish to grasp the opportunity offered by the Conference on the Future of Europe to deepen the European project.

New EU rules on labelling of tyres

26-06-2020

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The new regulation seeks to increase consumer awareness of the tyre label, and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display ...

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The new regulation seeks to increase consumer awareness of the tyre label, and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display the tyre label in all forms of purchase, including where the tyre is not physically shown in the store and where it is sold online or on a long-distance basis. Whereas the tyre label is currently applicable to passenger and light-duty vehicles, in future it would also apply to heavy-duty vehicles. The new label would include visual information on tyre performance in snow or ice conditions, and could be adjusted by means of delegated acts to include information on mileage, abrasion or re-studded tyres. Tyre labels would be included in the new European Product Database for Energy Labelling before any sale on the EU market. On 13 November 2019, successful trilogue negotiations resulted in a provisional agreement on the content of the new regulation. The legal text was finalised and the new TLR was formally adopted by the Council and Parliament in 2020 and published in the Official Journal of the EU on 5 June 2020. Its provisions become applicable from 1 May 2021.

Impact of coronavirus on energy markets

14-04-2020

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has had a strong impact on global energy markets, contributing to a collapse in the oil price as well as lower prices for other fossil fuels. Global shutdowns of economic activity have led to sharply reduced energy consumption and lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the short term, coronavirus will negatively affect new energy investments in all sectors, including renewables needed for the clean energy transition. The longer term impact is more uncertain and ...

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has had a strong impact on global energy markets, contributing to a collapse in the oil price as well as lower prices for other fossil fuels. Global shutdowns of economic activity have led to sharply reduced energy consumption and lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the short term, coronavirus will negatively affect new energy investments in all sectors, including renewables needed for the clean energy transition. The longer term impact is more uncertain and very much hinges on the nature and speed of the economic recovery, as well as the differing responses of global policy-makers to this challenge.

L’économie bleue: Vue d’ensemble et cadre stratégique de l’Union européenne

30-01-2020

L’économie bleue englobe toutes les activités économiques relatives aux mers et aux océans. Elle emploie plus de 4 millions de personnes dans l’UE et son paysage évolue rapidement. Certains secteurs traditionnels sont en déclin tandis que d’autres, tant traditionnels qu’émergents, affichent un fort potentiel de croissance et d’innovation. Le présent document s’intéresse au cadre stratégique et aux différentes initiatives et actions de l’UE. Il donne une vue d’ensemble des «facilitateurs clés» transversaux ...

L’économie bleue englobe toutes les activités économiques relatives aux mers et aux océans. Elle emploie plus de 4 millions de personnes dans l’UE et son paysage évolue rapidement. Certains secteurs traditionnels sont en déclin tandis que d’autres, tant traditionnels qu’émergents, affichent un fort potentiel de croissance et d’innovation. Le présent document s’intéresse au cadre stratégique et aux différentes initiatives et actions de l’UE. Il donne une vue d’ensemble des «facilitateurs clés» transversaux ainsi qu’une analyse par secteur. Lorsqu’elle s’avère pertinente, la dimension internationale ou la position du Parlement européen est mise en évidence.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Kadri Simson - Energy

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens: Approvisionnement et sécurité énergétiques

28-06-2019

La politique énergétique est une compétence partagée entre l’Union européenne et ses États membres. S’il appartient à l’Union, en vertu des traités, de garantir la sécurité de l’approvisionnement en énergie, les États membres sont compétents pour déterminer la structure de leur approvisionnement énergétique et choisir leurs sources d’énergie. La législation de l’Union en matière de sécurité de l’approvisionnement en énergie, qui se concentre sur les marchés du gaz naturel et de l’électricité, est ...

La politique énergétique est une compétence partagée entre l’Union européenne et ses États membres. S’il appartient à l’Union, en vertu des traités, de garantir la sécurité de l’approvisionnement en énergie, les États membres sont compétents pour déterminer la structure de leur approvisionnement énergétique et choisir leurs sources d’énergie. La législation de l’Union en matière de sécurité de l’approvisionnement en énergie, qui se concentre sur les marchés du gaz naturel et de l’électricité, est étroitement liée à d’autres objectifs de l’Union: la consolidation d’un marché unique de l’énergie, l’amélioration de l’efficacité énergétique ainsi que la promotion de sources d’énergie renouvelables afin de décarboner l’économie et d’atteindre les objectifs de l’accord de Paris. La législature 2014-2019 a vu naître de nombreuses initiatives en relation avec la sécurité de l’approvisionnement en énergie. Les institutions de l’Union sont parvenues à un accord concernant un règlement révisé sur la sécurité de l’approvisionnement en gaz, un règlement révisé sur la sécurité de l’approvisionnement en électricité, une décision révisée sur les accords intergouvernementaux dans le domaine de l’énergie, une révision ciblée de la directive sur le gaz en vue d’appliquer les principales dispositions de cette dernière aux gazoducs reliant l’Union européenne à des pays tiers, mais aussi de nouveaux objectifs relatifs à l’efficacité énergétique et aux énergies renouvelables à l’horizon 2030. Le Parlement a également adopté plusieurs résolutions d’initiative dans le domaine de l’énergie, y compris une résolution sur une nouvelle stratégie de l’Union pour le gaz naturel liquéfié et le stockage du gaz, élément primordial pour garantir la sécurité de l’approvisionnement en gaz. Entre-temps, des projets européens d’intérêt commun (PIC) financent des infrastructures énergétiques qui renforcent les interconnexions et consolident la sécurité de l’approvisionnement. Les citoyens européens attendent de plus en plus de l’Union qu’elle intervienne davantage dans le domaine de l’approvisionnement et de la sécurité énergétiques. Si ce point de vue était partagé par un peu plus de la moitié des citoyens de l’Union en 2016 (52 %), il est maintenant exprimé par environ deux tiers d’entre eux (65 %). L’Union conservera un rôle primordial dans le suivi de la sécurité de l’approvisionnement au cours de la transition énergétique depuis l’ancien système reposant sur une production centralisée dominée par les carburants fossiles et les marchés nationaux, vers un nouveau système caractérisé par une part élevée d’énergies renouvelables, par une production plus locale et par des marchés transfrontières. Cependant, si l’Union souhaitait intervenir directement dans la définition de l’approvisionnement en énergie de ses États membres, elle devrait suivre une procédure législative spéciale, exigeant l’unanimité du Conseil, et le Parlement serait amené à jouer un rôle consultatif uniquement. Le présent document est une mise à jour d’une note plus ancienne, publiée avant les élections européennes de 2019.

Common rules for gas pipelines entering the EU internal market

27-05-2019

In November 2017, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal to fully apply key provisions of the 2009 Gas Directive to gas pipelines between the European Union (EU) and third countries. Member States would need to cooperate with third countries to ensure full compliance with EU rules. The revised directive was seen by many observers as a part of the broader EU response to the Gazprom-led Nord Stream 2 project, which the European Commission publicly opposes. The Parliament adopted its ...

In November 2017, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal to fully apply key provisions of the 2009 Gas Directive to gas pipelines between the European Union (EU) and third countries. Member States would need to cooperate with third countries to ensure full compliance with EU rules. The revised directive was seen by many observers as a part of the broader EU response to the Gazprom-led Nord Stream 2 project, which the European Commission publicly opposes. The Parliament adopted its position on the gas directive in plenary on April 2018, whereas the Council adopted its general approach on 8 February 2019. This was swiftly followed by a single trilogue meeting on 12 February 2019 at which the EU institutions reached a provisional agreement. The agreed text was later formally adopted by Parliament and Council, and entered into force on 23 May 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Revised Energy Efficiency Directive

16-01-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation scheme, which currently requires utility companies to help their consumers use 1.5 % less energy each year. The Commission proposal also aims to make the rules on energy metering and billing clearer for consumers. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement among the EU Institutions on 19 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Member States are required to transpose most of the revised directive by 25 June 2020, although the provisions on metering and billing can be transposed by 25 October 2020. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Governance of the energy union

16-01-2019

The Commission proposed a regulation on governance of the energy union, as part of its Clean Energy package (30 November 2016). The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and help to implement the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports. Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and ...

The Commission proposed a regulation on governance of the energy union, as part of its Clean Energy package (30 November 2016). The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and help to implement the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports. Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and gain early input from the Commission. The proposed regulation envisages national and EU registries and inventories on greenhouse gas emissions for the post-2020 period, as a means to assess progress in meeting the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and concluded with a provisional agreement on 20 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

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