18

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

Artificial intelligence, data protection and elections

20-05-2019

The Facebook/Cambridge Analytica case in 2018, revealing alleged misuse of personal data for political advertising, demonstrated how the underlying values of the European data protection rules are essential for democracy. The EU has recently adopted a series of additional initiatives to support free and fair elections, reflected not least in European Parliament (EP) debates and resolutions.

The Facebook/Cambridge Analytica case in 2018, revealing alleged misuse of personal data for political advertising, demonstrated how the underlying values of the European data protection rules are essential for democracy. The EU has recently adopted a series of additional initiatives to support free and fair elections, reflected not least in European Parliament (EP) debates and resolutions.

Rules for EU institutions' processing of personal data

12-09-2018

In the context of the comprehensive reform of the EU's legal framework for data protection, the Commission tabled a proposal in January 2017 for a 'regulation on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and agencies and the free movement of such data' and repealing the existing one (Regulation No 45/2001). The aim is to align it to the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that has been fully applicable since ...

In the context of the comprehensive reform of the EU's legal framework for data protection, the Commission tabled a proposal in January 2017 for a 'regulation on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and agencies and the free movement of such data' and repealing the existing one (Regulation No 45/2001). The aim is to align it to the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that has been fully applicable since 25 May 2018. Interinstitutional trilogue meetings, in which debate focused on also applying the regulation to operational data of EU bodies carrying out law enforcement activities, brought an agreement between the co-legislators in May. The compromise text is due to be voted by the Parliament in the September plenary session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Protection des données à caractère personnel traitées par les institutions et organes de l’Union

05-09-2018

Aux fins de la révision des règles existantes dans ce domaine et conformément au règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD), la Commission européenne a présenté en 2016 une proposition régissant le traitement des données à caractère personnel par les institutions, organes et organismes de l’Union. Les négociations avec le Conseil ont abouti à un texte de compromis, qui devrait faire l’objet d’un vote en première lecture lors de la période de session de septembre.

Aux fins de la révision des règles existantes dans ce domaine et conformément au règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD), la Commission européenne a présenté en 2016 une proposition régissant le traitement des données à caractère personnel par les institutions, organes et organismes de l’Union. Les négociations avec le Conseil ont abouti à un texte de compromis, qui devrait faire l’objet d’un vote en première lecture lors de la période de session de septembre.

Le bouclier de protection des données: Rapport sur l’état d’avancement des règles de transfert des données

26-07-2018

L’arrêt Schrems de la CJUE d’octobre 2015 n’a pas seulement déclaré invalide la décision de la Commission européenne concernant le régime de transfert de données de la sphère de sécurité UE–États-Unis, il a également statué sur nombre d’exigences cruciales constituant les fondations de la protection des données de l’Union européenne. Moins d’un an après l’arrêt de la CJUE, la Commission avait adopté une nouvelle décision d’adéquation dans laquelle elle estimait que le nouveau cadre pour le transfert ...

L’arrêt Schrems de la CJUE d’octobre 2015 n’a pas seulement déclaré invalide la décision de la Commission européenne concernant le régime de transfert de données de la sphère de sécurité UE–États-Unis, il a également statué sur nombre d’exigences cruciales constituant les fondations de la protection des données de l’Union européenne. Moins d’un an après l’arrêt de la CJUE, la Commission avait adopté une nouvelle décision d’adéquation dans laquelle elle estimait que le nouveau cadre pour le transfert de données UE–États-Unis, le bouclier de protection des données (2016), offrait une protection adéquate aux citoyens de l’Union. Les principales améliorations du bouclier de protection des données (par rapport à son prédécesseur) ainsi que les réactions critiques à l’égard des nouvelles modalités sont analysées dans le présent document. Le premier examen annuel conjoint a eu lieu en septembre 2017, à la suite duquel aussi bien la Commission que le groupe de travail «Article 29» ont publié leurs rapports respectifs. Bien que l’on constate des progrès, un certain nombre de préoccupations subsistent et de nouvelles difficultés concernant le bouclier de protection des données ont surgi, notamment à l’aune du scandale Facebook/Cambridge Analytica, comme l’a souligné le Parlement européen dans sa récente résolution.

Data protection rules applicable to the European Parliament and to MEPs: Current regime and recent developments

20-06-2018

Data protection is a fundamental right enshrined in both primary and secondary EU law. More specifically, the main reference for data protection in Europe is the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is fully applicable since 25 May 2018. Moreover, specific data protection rules (currently Regulation 45/2001) apply to the EU institutions. The latter are under review, to adapt their principles and provisions to the GDPR. The processing of data relating to parliamentary activities is ...

Data protection is a fundamental right enshrined in both primary and secondary EU law. More specifically, the main reference for data protection in Europe is the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is fully applicable since 25 May 2018. Moreover, specific data protection rules (currently Regulation 45/2001) apply to the EU institutions. The latter are under review, to adapt their principles and provisions to the GDPR. The processing of data relating to parliamentary activities is therefore covered by these specific rules, as is personal data relating to, or processed by, Members of the European Parliament (MEPs). This Briefing provides an overview of the main provisions applicable to parliamentary activities and in particular to MEPs, taking account of the fact that the process of reforming the current rules has not been formally concluded (even if a political agreement has been reached between the co legislators). An update of this Briefing will be published in due course.

GDPR goes live: A modern data protection law

15-05-2018

Aimed at strengthening citizens' rights uniformly while reducing burdens for companies and public entities, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies fully as of 25 May 2018. The long-awaited (and often feared) law is part of a reform package adopted in 2016 to foster trust in a digital age. The recent revelations on misuses of data show how the underlying values of the GDPR standards are essential for democracy.

Aimed at strengthening citizens' rights uniformly while reducing burdens for companies and public entities, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies fully as of 25 May 2018. The long-awaited (and often feared) law is part of a reform package adopted in 2016 to foster trust in a digital age. The recent revelations on misuses of data show how the underlying values of the GDPR standards are essential for democracy.

CJEU Opinion on EU-Canada PNR agreement

05-09-2017

A new agreement on the transfer of passenger name records (PNR) was signed by the EU Council and Canada in 2014, but conclusion of the agreement requires the European Parliament's consent. Consulted by Parliament, the Court of Justice of the EU held in July 2017 that the envisaged agreement needs to be revised.

A new agreement on the transfer of passenger name records (PNR) was signed by the EU Council and Canada in 2014, but conclusion of the agreement requires the European Parliament's consent. Consulted by Parliament, the Court of Justice of the EU held in July 2017 that the envisaged agreement needs to be revised.

Reform of the e-Privacy Directive

30-08-2017

In January 2017, the Commission tabled a proposal for a regulation on privacy and electronic communications which would replace the current 2002 e-Privacy Directive. The main objectives of the review are: enhancing security and communications confidentiality; defining clearer rules on tracking technologies such as cookies; and achieving greater harmonisation among Member States. Stakeholders are divided on certain issues, including on the basic need for a new measure to protect confidentiality in ...

In January 2017, the Commission tabled a proposal for a regulation on privacy and electronic communications which would replace the current 2002 e-Privacy Directive. The main objectives of the review are: enhancing security and communications confidentiality; defining clearer rules on tracking technologies such as cookies; and achieving greater harmonisation among Member States. Stakeholders are divided on certain issues, including on the basic need for a new measure to protect confidentiality in e-communications. Some national parliaments have made comments on the proposal, and discussions are progressing in Council. In the European Parliament, rapporteur Marju Lauristin (S&D, Estonia) presented a draft report to the Civil Liberties Committee on 21 June 2017, and this is expected to be voted in October 2017.

Contracts for the supply of digital content and personal data protection

15-05-2017

The proposed directive on the supply of digital content is intended to regulate the main contractual rights and duties of parties to contracts for the supply of digital content and services, and create a harmonised legal framework for digital content to benefit both consumers and businesses. It covers not only contracts where digital content or services are provided in exchange for money, but also those where the consumer provides personal or other data in lieu of money to gain access to digital ...

The proposed directive on the supply of digital content is intended to regulate the main contractual rights and duties of parties to contracts for the supply of digital content and services, and create a harmonised legal framework for digital content to benefit both consumers and businesses. It covers not only contracts where digital content or services are provided in exchange for money, but also those where the consumer provides personal or other data in lieu of money to gain access to digital content or services. The interplay between this proposed private law instrument and the existing public law rules on data protection (notably the recently adopted General Data Protection Regulation) have been the subject of some debate. The European Data Protection Supervisor's recent opinion was critical of the proposal, arguing that, in the EU, personal data 'cannot be conceived as a mere economic asset' and cannot therefore be treated as the consumer's contractual counter-performance in lieu of money. The draft report prepared by the co-rapporteurs in Parliament includes those contracts in which consumers do not pay a price (but potentially provide data) within the scope of the proposal. It eliminates however the notion of personal data as a form of contractual 'counter-performance'. The co-legislators are now facing the challenging task of reconciling the fundamental rights approach with the requirements of economic reality, including the need to grant legal protection to consumers who provide their data in order to access digital content or services.

Les incidences des mégadonnées sur les droits fondamentaux

10-03-2017

L’essor des appareils intelligents connectés et du traitement des mégadonnées, en permettant pour la première fois la disponibilité, le partage et l’utilisation automatisée des données, ouvre des perspectives de gain d’efficacité et d’amélioration de nos vies, mais comporte aussi de risques pour les droits fondamentaux des individus. Le Parlement européen doit se prononcer sur un rapport d’initiative concernant ces questions lors de la seconde session plénière de mars 2017.

L’essor des appareils intelligents connectés et du traitement des mégadonnées, en permettant pour la première fois la disponibilité, le partage et l’utilisation automatisée des données, ouvre des perspectives de gain d’efficacité et d’amélioration de nos vies, mais comporte aussi de risques pour les droits fondamentaux des individus. Le Parlement européen doit se prononcer sur un rapport d’initiative concernant ces questions lors de la seconde session plénière de mars 2017.

Evénements à venir

02-12-2020
Public Hearing on AI and Health
Audition -
AIDA
02-12-2020
Facilitating a healthy lifestyle: how to reduce cancer related lifestyle risk factors
Audition -
BECA
02-12-2020
Western Balkans and Belarus - Interparliamentary Committee Meeting
Autre événement -
AFET

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