18

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Mot-clé
Date

Report on employment and social policies in the euro area

07-10-2019

At the beginning of the European Semester cycle, in November, the Council adopts euro-area recommendations and conclusions on the annual growth survey and the alert mechanism report. In advance of this the Employment and Social Affairs Committee, as of last year, prepares a report on employment and social policies in the euro area. This year's report puts great emphasis on the urgent need to address persistent inequalities across regions, generations and genders. It calls for social priorities to ...

At the beginning of the European Semester cycle, in November, the Council adopts euro-area recommendations and conclusions on the annual growth survey and the alert mechanism report. In advance of this the Employment and Social Affairs Committee, as of last year, prepares a report on employment and social policies in the euro area. This year's report puts great emphasis on the urgent need to address persistent inequalities across regions, generations and genders. It calls for social priorities to be placed on a par with economic ones and for the implementation rate of the country specific recommendations to be stepped up in the euro area and beyond. Parliament is due to debate the report during the October I plenary part-session.

A new directive on work-life balance

02-04-2019

Despite significant progress for some social groups in the area of work-life balance, there has been a general trend of decline since 2011, and progress amongst Member States has been uneven. This proposed directive (complemented with non-legislative measures) should lead to the repeal of the existing Framework Agreement on Parental Leave, made binding by Council Directive 2010/18/EU (the Parental Leave Directive). The new directive contains proposals for paternity, parental and carers’ leave. Stakeholders ...

Despite significant progress for some social groups in the area of work-life balance, there has been a general trend of decline since 2011, and progress amongst Member States has been uneven. This proposed directive (complemented with non-legislative measures) should lead to the repeal of the existing Framework Agreement on Parental Leave, made binding by Council Directive 2010/18/EU (the Parental Leave Directive). The new directive contains proposals for paternity, parental and carers’ leave. Stakeholders have been divided over the level of ambition of the proposed measures. Trilogue negotiations started in September 2018, and a provisional agreement among the three institutions was reached after the sixth trilogue meeting, in January 2019. The provisional agreement is less ambitious than the original Commission proposal and the Parliament’s position, which had, in some ways, gone further than the Commission. The text was approved by the Parliament’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee in February 2019, and now needs to be adopted in plenary. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Social protection in the EU: State of play, challenges and options

11-10-2018

Globalisation, technological change, an aging population and changes to the world of work have made securing social protection for all, i.e. economic and social security, a major challenge. When social protection systems work well, they can have a stabilising effect on the economy and promote socio-economic equality and stability. By contrast, inadequate or ineffective systems can exacerbate inequality. Indeed, improving the existing social protection systems is the priority of half of the principles ...

Globalisation, technological change, an aging population and changes to the world of work have made securing social protection for all, i.e. economic and social security, a major challenge. When social protection systems work well, they can have a stabilising effect on the economy and promote socio-economic equality and stability. By contrast, inadequate or ineffective systems can exacerbate inequality. Indeed, improving the existing social protection systems is the priority of half of the principles of the European Pillar of Social Rights – the European Commission's overarching social field initiative designed to serve as a compass for policies updating current labour market and welfare systems. While implementation of the 'social pillar' remains primarily the responsibility of the Member States, in close cooperation with the social partners, the European Commission has put forward several legislative and non-legislative initiatives to support this process in the area of social protection. These include the proposal for a recommendation on social protection for all, including non-standard workers, responding to calls from the European Parliament and the social partners and stakeholders. This proposal had the difficult task of addressing all the disagreements that had arisen during the two-phase consultation in the preparatory phase. While all parties seem to agree on the importance of adjusting social protection to the new realities of life and work, there are differences of opinion concerning the technicalities, such as the financing of schemes. This is in part a reflection of the current evidence that raises many questions as to the optimal response to the new challenges in very diverse systems of social protection across the Member States. The main trends currently include a combination of social protection and social investment, individualisation of social protection schemes and a potential move towards universal social protection, whereby social protection would be removed from the employment relationship. However, financing these schemes poses a challenge.

Les acteurs confessionnels et la mise en œuvre du socle européen des droits sociaux

19-06-2018

Le socle européen des droits sociaux a été proclamé et signé conjointement par la Commission européenne, le Parlement européen et le Conseil lors du sommet social de Göteborg, en novembre 2017. Les 20 principes et droits qui constituent le socle social sont fondés sur l’acquis social, c’est-à-dire sur le mandat social contenu dans les dispositions contraignantes du droit de l’Union, et devraient servir de «boussole» pour le renouveau des marchés du travail et des systèmes de protection sociale dans ...

Le socle européen des droits sociaux a été proclamé et signé conjointement par la Commission européenne, le Parlement européen et le Conseil lors du sommet social de Göteborg, en novembre 2017. Les 20 principes et droits qui constituent le socle social sont fondés sur l’acquis social, c’est-à-dire sur le mandat social contenu dans les dispositions contraignantes du droit de l’Union, et devraient servir de «boussole» pour le renouveau des marchés du travail et des systèmes de protection sociale dans l’ensemble de l’Union européenne. Leur mise en œuvre relève largement de la compétence des États membres, en coopération avec les partenaires sociaux et avec le soutien de l’Union européenne. Les organisations confessionnelles sont similaires à des organisations bénévoles, c’est-à-dire des associations de la société civile, des organisations du secteur tertiaire et des organisations à but non lucratif. Certaines s’inspirent de valeurs religieuses sans être officiellement liées à des institutions religieuses. Elles jouent un rôle important dans le traitement de problèmes sociaux, notamment pour les populations mal desservies. Elles coopèrent souvent avec des organisations laïques et contribuent à l’État-providence. Dans le contexte de l’Union, aucune distinction n’est établie entre organisations confessionnelles et organisations laïques lorsqu’il s’agit de l’élaboration des politiques, de la mise en œuvre ou du financement des programmes. Les organisations confessionnelles ont accueilli favorablement le socle social et souligné notamment le rôle qu’elles pourraient jouer en ce qui concerne sa mise en œuvre sur le terrain. Elles peuvent non seulement fournir des services mais aussi contribuer à la conception de stratégies et de mécanismes de financement en établissant des liens entre les acteurs locaux, nationaux et européens. Il existe néanmoins encore de nombreuses lacunes en ce qui concerne l’évaluation de leurs activités, ce qui rend difficile la quantification de leur contribution réelle au fonctionnement de l’État-providence.

EYE event - Equal opportunities: Forever poor or born to be free?

16-05-2018

The principle of equal opportunities for all is a corner stone of democracy. It implies that, on the basis of the principle of non-discrimination, all people should have opportunities in all areas of life, such as education, employment, advancement or distribution of resources, irrespective of their age, race, gender, religion, ethnic origin or any other individual or group characteristic unrelated to ability, performance or qualifications. All kinds of inequalities affect access to opportunities ...

The principle of equal opportunities for all is a corner stone of democracy. It implies that, on the basis of the principle of non-discrimination, all people should have opportunities in all areas of life, such as education, employment, advancement or distribution of resources, irrespective of their age, race, gender, religion, ethnic origin or any other individual or group characteristic unrelated to ability, performance or qualifications. All kinds of inequalities affect access to opportunities and can lead to more inequalities. As long as all have equal access to high-quality education, other public goods and services, finance and entrepreneurship, some level of inequality of outcomes is both economically inevitable and politically acceptable. Inequalities, including those of opportunities, are currently growing and young people are particularly hardly hit. There is hardly any public debate that does not touch on this issue as it is at the core of the current global challenges. What is really at stake and how is the European Union responding?

L’avenir de l’Europe: Les contours du débat actuel

12-04-2018

À la suite de la décision du Royaume-Uni de quitter l’Union européenne, prise à l’issue du référendum de juin 2016, l’Union a lancé une réflexion approfondie sur l’avenir de l’Europe, qui se poursuit au sein de divers forums et institutions. Le débat a pris un nouvel élan : l’accélération des négociations avec le Royaume-Uni sur son retrait de l’Union, les résultats électoraux dans certains États membres et les prochaines élections européennes de mai 2019 influent sur l’ampleur de la discussion et ...

À la suite de la décision du Royaume-Uni de quitter l’Union européenne, prise à l’issue du référendum de juin 2016, l’Union a lancé une réflexion approfondie sur l’avenir de l’Europe, qui se poursuit au sein de divers forums et institutions. Le débat a pris un nouvel élan : l’accélération des négociations avec le Royaume-Uni sur son retrait de l’Union, les résultats électoraux dans certains États membres et les prochaines élections européennes de mai 2019 influent sur l’ampleur de la discussion et la visibilité des positions des différents acteurs concernés. Dans ce contexte, depuis le début de l’année 2018, le Parlement européen organise des débats en plénière sur « L’avenir de l’Europe » avec des chefs d’État ou de gouvernement : le Premier ministre irlandais, Leo Varadkar, en janvier, le Premier ministre croate, Andrej Plenković, en février, et le Premier ministre portugais, António Costa, en mars. Le Président français, Emmanuel Macron, prononcera un discours lors de la période de session plénière d’avril 2018. Le Premier ministre belge, Charles Michel, et le Premier ministre luxembourgeois, Xavier Bettel, ont confirmé leur présence dans l’hémicycle, le premier au début du mois de mai, à Bruxelles, le second à la fin du mois de mai, à Strasbourg. La présente note d’information donne une vue d’ensemble de l’état d’avancement du débat en cours dans plusieurs domaines d’action majeurs, tels que l’avenir de l’Union économique et monétaire ou la dimension sociale de l’Union, ainsi que des évolutions récentes dans la politique européenne en matière de migration et dans le domaine de la sécurité et de la défense ; en outre, il comprend certaines analyses préliminaires concernant le futur cadre financier pluriannuel après 2020 et les discussions sur des questions institutionnelles plus larges. Voir également la publication conjointe, From Rome to Sibiu – The European Council and the Future of Europe debate (De Rome à Sibiu – Le Conseil européen et le débat sur la réforme de l’UE), PE 615.667.

Mise en œuvre du socle social

05-12-2017

Dans le cadre du sommet social de Göteborg, le socle européen des droits sociaux («socle social») a été proclamé et signé conjointement par la Commission, le Conseil et le Parlement européen le 17 novembre dernier. Le défi majeur reste néanmoins d’appliquer ce cadre de référence à l’ensemble des citoyens européens. En raison de la compétence limitée de l’Union européenne dans le domaine social, la mise en œuvre de ce socle revient aux États membres, en collaboration avec des partenaires sociaux. ...

Dans le cadre du sommet social de Göteborg, le socle européen des droits sociaux («socle social») a été proclamé et signé conjointement par la Commission, le Conseil et le Parlement européen le 17 novembre dernier. Le défi majeur reste néanmoins d’appliquer ce cadre de référence à l’ensemble des citoyens européens. En raison de la compétence limitée de l’Union européenne dans le domaine social, la mise en œuvre de ce socle revient aux États membres, en collaboration avec des partenaires sociaux. Le Parlement a souligné à plusieurs reprises combien il était important de se concentrer sur trois éléments lors du processus de mise en œuvre: une approche axée sur le cycle de vie, la gouvernance et le financement. La période de session plénière de décembre devrait permettre de recueillir les déclarations de la Commission et du Conseil avant la réunion de décembre du Conseil européen au cours de laquelle les discussions sur la dimension sociale de l’Union, y compris l'éducation, se poursuivront.

La gouvernance sociale dans l’Union européenne: Gouverner des systèmes complexes

17-11-2017

Si la gouvernance économique au sein de l’Union relève d’un cadre réglementé et contraignant, il n’existe pas de cadre équivalent pour la gouvernance sociale. À l’heure actuelle, la gouvernance sociale régit principalement le domaine des affaires non contraignantes et non réglementées, bien qu’elle soit également dotée de mécanismes de gouvernance contraignants. La présente publication vise à fournir un aperçu des aspects sociaux de la gouvernance de l’Union. Elle examine les mécanismes et les instruments ...

Si la gouvernance économique au sein de l’Union relève d’un cadre réglementé et contraignant, il n’existe pas de cadre équivalent pour la gouvernance sociale. À l’heure actuelle, la gouvernance sociale régit principalement le domaine des affaires non contraignantes et non réglementées, bien qu’elle soit également dotée de mécanismes de gouvernance contraignants. La présente publication vise à fournir un aperçu des aspects sociaux de la gouvernance de l’Union. Elle examine les mécanismes et les instruments de gouvernance sociale de l’Union existants, ainsi que leur état actuel, les débats qui les entourent et les évolutions possibles.

Social convergence and EU accession

28-09-2017

The European Pillar of Social Rights should serve as a 'compass for a renewed process of convergence towards better working and living conditions in the EU Member States'. Convergence of policies, regimes and outcomes happens either by 'growing together' or 'catching up'. There is, however, no consensus in the literature concerning the effect of European integration on welfare states. It is also difficult to discern whether European policy or the extent of its domestic implementation led to a certain ...

The European Pillar of Social Rights should serve as a 'compass for a renewed process of convergence towards better working and living conditions in the EU Member States'. Convergence of policies, regimes and outcomes happens either by 'growing together' or 'catching up'. There is, however, no consensus in the literature concerning the effect of European integration on welfare states. It is also difficult to discern whether European policy or the extent of its domestic implementation led to a certain result. While analysing gross domestic product and income levels alongside the social expenditure of individual Member States are the most common ways of measuring social convergence, new methods for producing synthetic measures and indexes emerge. Recently, in addition to countries' different starting points in terms of their history, institutional, political, economic and cultural contexts, the importance of micro-politics and micro-sociology are stressed as an explanation of different paths of development. For better policy design, a move beyond analyses based on traditional groupings of welfare regimes is suggested. Although both modern Spain and Portugal, and the central and eastern European countries, developed from authoritarian or totalitarian regimes, their social convergence paths differed greatly. In Spain and Portugal, the transition towards democratic stabilisation that began in the mid-1970s was further encouraged by EU accession. The countries followed distinct paths, but both experienced upward convergence. Following the 2008 crisis, however, their situation deteriorated steadily. Central and eastern European countries entered the accession process with many institutional, political and social challenges stemming from their transition to democracy since 1989. Their social convergence varied following accession, but was generally weak. After 2008, social convergence in the Baltic States declined greatly, but picked up quickly later, while the other countries showed some progress up to 2011, before deteriorating.

Reflection paper on the social dimension of the EU

07-06-2017

The paper on the EU's social dimension, the first of five papers within the white paper process, is the European Commission's contribution to a debate among the leaders of the 27 Member States (other than the UK), EU institutions, social partners and citizens on two major issues in the social and employment fields: the main challenges that Member States are facing and the added value of the various EU instruments available to tackle them. By the end of the process the EU should have a clear mandate ...

The paper on the EU's social dimension, the first of five papers within the white paper process, is the European Commission's contribution to a debate among the leaders of the 27 Member States (other than the UK), EU institutions, social partners and citizens on two major issues in the social and employment fields: the main challenges that Member States are facing and the added value of the various EU instruments available to tackle them. By the end of the process the EU should have a clear mandate from the Member States on the areas it should be tackling and on the extent of their commitment to working together. The results should feed into a document setting out practical measures for moving ahead, in time for the December 2017 European Council. The concepts 'social dimension' and 'social Europe' are interpreted in diverse ways across the EU and most of the competence developed over the past 60 years to implement policies remains with the Member States. In this context the Commission is proposing three alternative scenarios: an exclusive focus on the free movement of workers, development of a multispeed Europe, and genuine deepening of economic and monetary union across the EU-27. The successful implementation of the European pillar of social rights and related initiatives will depend a great deal on the outcome of this reflection process. The European Parliament has put forward several ideas on how to strengthen the social dimension of the European project, including by linking economic and social governance more closely, and increasing budgetary capacity so as to move towards upward convergence. This briefing is one in a series on the European Commission's reflection papers following up the March 2017 White Paper on the future of Europe.

Evénements à venir

10-12-2019
EU institutional dynamics: Ten years after the Lisbon Treaty
Autre événement -
EPRS
11-12-2019
Take-aways from 2019 and outlook for 2020: What Think Tanks are Thinking
Autre événement -
EPRS

Partenaires

Restez connectés

email update imageSystème d'alertes email

Le système d'alertes email, qui envoie directement les dernières informations à votre adresse électronique, vous permet de suivre toutes les personnes et tous les événements liés au Parlement. Ceci inclut les dernières nouvelles des députés, les services d'information ou le Think Tank.

Le système est accessible partout sur le site du Parlement. Pour vous abonner et recevoir les notifications du Think Tank, il suffit de communiquer votre adresse email, de sélectionner le thème qui vous intéresse, d'indiquer la fréquence (quotidienne, hebdomadaire ou mensuelle) et de confirmer votre enregistrement en cliquant sur le lien envoyé par email.

RSS imageFlux RSS

Ne manquez aucune information ou mise à jour du site du Parlement européen grâce à notre flux RSS.

Veuillez cliquer sur le lien ci-dessous afin de configurer votre flux.