65

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

Harnessing the new momentum in transatlantic relations: Potential areas for common action during the Biden presidency

10-06-2021

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action ...

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action, trade and climate diplomacy in the round. Second, it analyses the comparative fabrics of US and European societies through the triple lens of violent extremism, the rule of law and technological disruption. Third, the prospects for 'crisis-proofing' the transatlantic space for the future are examined by looking at defence, health security and multilateralism. The paper also explores some potential avenues for closer transatlantic parliamentary cooperation, building on the already strong relationship between the European Parliament and the US Congress.

Understanding EU action against human trafficking

25-05-2021

On 14 April 2021, the European Commission presented its new 2021-2025 strategy on combating trafficking in human beings – 10 years after the adoption of Directive 2011/36/EU, the core EU instrument addressing this phenomenon and protecting its victims. Despite some progress achieved in recent years, a number of challenges still lie ahead. Human trafficking is not only a serious and borderless crime, but also a lucrative business, driven by demand for sexual (and other) services. Criminals exploit ...

On 14 April 2021, the European Commission presented its new 2021-2025 strategy on combating trafficking in human beings – 10 years after the adoption of Directive 2011/36/EU, the core EU instrument addressing this phenomenon and protecting its victims. Despite some progress achieved in recent years, a number of challenges still lie ahead. Human trafficking is not only a serious and borderless crime, but also a lucrative business, driven by demand for sexual (and other) services. Criminals exploit vulnerable people (increasingly children), making high profits and taking relatively low risks. Vulnerability can result from a whole range of factors, including socio-economic ones, and migrants are a particularly vulnerable group. Gender also plays an important part, as women and men are not trafficked in the same way or for the same purpose. Women and girls represent a disproportionately high number of victims, both globally and at EU level, especially in terms of sexual exploitation. This form of exploitation is still dominant in the EU, even though other forms are on the rise, such as exploitation for forced labour and for criminal activities. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought new challenges for victims, as well as amplifying the vulnerabilities of those most at risk. Traffickers – like legal businesses – moved to digital modi operandi, making victims even less visible and less able to ask for help and protection. In its efforts to eradicate human trafficking, the EU has not only created a legal framework, comprising an anti-trafficking directive and instruments to protect victims' rights and prevent labour exploitation; it has also put in place an operational cooperation network involving EU decentralised agencies, including Europol, Eurojust, CEPOL and Frontex. Moreover, trafficking in human beings is a priority of the EU policy cycle for organised and serious international crime. The European Parliament plays a major role, not only in designing policies but also in evaluating their implementation.

Electronic evidence in criminal matters

22-03-2021

In December 2020, the European Parliament's Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs Committee adopted its reports on a pair of 2018 legislative proposals on electronic evidence in criminal matters, and mandates to start trilogue negotiations on the two proposals. The proposed new rules would allow law enforcement and judicial authorities to directly request (or temporarily secure) electronic data needed for investigating and prosecuting crime from electronic service providers operating in the EU ...

In December 2020, the European Parliament's Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs Committee adopted its reports on a pair of 2018 legislative proposals on electronic evidence in criminal matters, and mandates to start trilogue negotiations on the two proposals. The proposed new rules would allow law enforcement and judicial authorities to directly request (or temporarily secure) electronic data needed for investigating and prosecuting crime from electronic service providers operating in the EU (wherever the data is stored), and would impose an obligation on these service providers to appoint a legal representative for the purpose of gathering evidence and answering competent authorities' requests. This two-part legislative initiative is the result of an almost two-year process of reflection on how to better adapt criminal justice to the challenges of the digital age, with a specific focus on jurisdiction in cyberspace and access to electronic evidence. The initiative is part of a broader array of international efforts to improve the legal framework and address persistent legal uncertainty that affects law enforcement and private parties alike. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Mise en œuvre de la décision-cadre relative au mandat d’arrêt européen

13-01-2021

Tous les États membres ont transposé la décision-cadre du Conseil de 2002 relative au mandat d’arrêt européen (MAE) et aux procédures de remise entre États membres. Au cours de la session plénière de janvier 2021, le Parlement européen doit débattre d’un rapport d’initiative concernant sa mise en œuvre.

Tous les États membres ont transposé la décision-cadre du Conseil de 2002 relative au mandat d’arrêt européen (MAE) et aux procédures de remise entre États membres. Au cours de la session plénière de janvier 2021, le Parlement européen doit débattre d’un rapport d’initiative concernant sa mise en œuvre.

The fight against terrorism

25-05-2018

Significant benefits could be achieved by the EU and its Member States by addressing the gaps and barriers in the area of the fight against terrorism, notably by developing an evidence-based EU criminal policy cycle involving the European Parliament and national parliaments. In this context, EU institutions should conduct comprehensive ex-ante assessments and ex-post evaluations of counterterrorism measures, in line with better law-making principles. The effectiveness and fundamental rights compliance ...

Significant benefits could be achieved by the EU and its Member States by addressing the gaps and barriers in the area of the fight against terrorism, notably by developing an evidence-based EU criminal policy cycle involving the European Parliament and national parliaments. In this context, EU institutions should conduct comprehensive ex-ante assessments and ex-post evaluations of counterterrorism measures, in line with better law-making principles. The effectiveness and fundamental rights compliance of counter-radicalisation programmes should continue to be monitored. The framework for countering terrorism requires further refinement. A European law enforcement culture with full respect for fundamental rights needs to be fostered in which relevant information is shared and analysed, judicial cooperation tools are properly utilised and seeking the support of EU agencies becomes a natural reflex. This also requires the allocation of significant resources aimed at training and exchanges. Beyond resulting in more relevant, coherent, effective and efficient action in the fight against terrorism, such measures could increase the wellbeing of the population, reduce the material and immaterial impacts of terrorism, and ensure protection of fundamental rights when impacted by counterterrorism measures.

Drugs package: Tackling new psychoactive substances

23-10-2017

Improving the EU's response to the rapid spread of new psychoactive substances has become urgent, and consequently Parliament is due to vote on a 'drugs package' during the October II plenary session. The package makes additions to the directive setting common minimum rules on criminal acts and penalties in the field of illicit drug trafficking, as well as corresponding amendments to the founding regulation of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).

Improving the EU's response to the rapid spread of new psychoactive substances has become urgent, and consequently Parliament is due to vote on a 'drugs package' during the October II plenary session. The package makes additions to the directive setting common minimum rules on criminal acts and penalties in the field of illicit drug trafficking, as well as corresponding amendments to the founding regulation of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).

Création du Parquet européen

28-09-2017

Le Parlement européen devrait, lors de la période de session d’octobre I, décider s'il donne ou non son approbation à la proposition de règlement concernant le Parquet européen, sur laquelle 20 États membres se sont accordés au titre de la coopération renforcée en juin 2017.

Le Parlement européen devrait, lors de la période de session d’octobre I, décider s'il donne ou non son approbation à la proposition de règlement concernant le Parquet européen, sur laquelle 20 États membres se sont accordés au titre de la coopération renforcée en juin 2017.

La corruption dans l’Union européenne : Prévalence de la corruption et lutte contre ce phénomène dans certains États membres de l’Union européenne

18-09-2017

La présente étude porte sur la prévalence de la corruption dans l’Union européenne et décrit les mesures prises pour lutter contre ce problème. Elle présente les initiatives et les politiques mises en place par les pouvoirs publics à l’échelle nationale, régionale et locale dans huit États membres, classés du nord au sud et de l’ouest à l’est: la Finlande, le Royaume-Uni, la France, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, la Croatie, la Roumanie et la Bulgarie. Pour mieux comprendre le contexte et les caractéristiques ...

La présente étude porte sur la prévalence de la corruption dans l’Union européenne et décrit les mesures prises pour lutter contre ce problème. Elle présente les initiatives et les politiques mises en place par les pouvoirs publics à l’échelle nationale, régionale et locale dans huit États membres, classés du nord au sud et de l’ouest à l’est: la Finlande, le Royaume-Uni, la France, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, la Croatie, la Roumanie et la Bulgarie. Pour mieux comprendre le contexte et les caractéristiques de la lutte anticorruption et fournir quelques exemples concluants quant aux actions envisageables, ce document présente la perception de la corruption par les citoyens, le cadre juridique, institutionnel et politique, ainsi que certaines des meilleures pratiques adoptées à différents niveaux d’administration.

Public expectations and EU policies - Fight against terrorism

30-06-2016

EU citizens show strong expectations for increased involvement of the EU in the fight against terrorism. The current EU legal framework is limited by the primary role of the Member States in this area. Nevertheless, there is still the scope and potential for increased EU involvement within the current legal framework. This briefing considers this and also covers current and potential relevant financing at EU level. Financial instruments that tackle counter-terrorism directly, indirectly or partially ...

EU citizens show strong expectations for increased involvement of the EU in the fight against terrorism. The current EU legal framework is limited by the primary role of the Member States in this area. Nevertheless, there is still the scope and potential for increased EU involvement within the current legal framework. This briefing considers this and also covers current and potential relevant financing at EU level. Financial instruments that tackle counter-terrorism directly, indirectly or partially are spread across the EU budget and are increasing.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

17-05-2016

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in May 2015.

Evénements à venir

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Autre événement -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Autre événement -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Autre événement -
EPRS

Partenaires