115

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Fair minimum wages in the EU - Pre-legislative synthesis of national, regional and local positions on the European Commission's initiative

26-10-2020

This briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of European system of multilevel governance. Based on EPRS analysis ...

This briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of European system of multilevel governance. Based on EPRS analysis, partner organisations at European, national, regional and local levels point to the following main considerations that they consider should shape discussion of the forthcoming initiative on fair minimum wages for workers in the EU: • There are fears regarding the implications of the EU initiative for the respective national systems, with the various stakeholders suggesting a cautious approach as part of what could prove to be a long-term discussion. A complex differentiated approach with several safeguards, adapted to the respective systems in place, would appear to be key to avoiding an initiative with only minimal ambitions. • A broad consensus is observed regarding the need to reinforce the social partners; strengthening social dialogue and promoting collective bargaining should be used as an opportunity to explore ambitious measures in this area. • The unresolved debate on the effects of higher minimum wages on the economy and employment situation underlines the need for detailed and regular analysis, including by means of greater use of impact assessment tools. This would be valuable in order to prevent negative consequences and demonstrate the added value of EU action. • Some specific (complementary) instruments deserve to be considered, such as the country-specific recommendations of the European Semester and public procurement procedures.

The scope of EU labour law: Who is (not) covered by key directives?

26-10-2020

This in-depth analysis examines the current EU labour law instruments for workers’ protection and highlights existing gaps in coverage which may require further action. It analyses a selection of directives in order to determine how non-standard workers are often excluded from their scope of application, and the extent to which newer instruments account for a broader variety of employment relationships. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life ...

This in-depth analysis examines the current EU labour law instruments for workers’ protection and highlights existing gaps in coverage which may require further action. It analyses a selection of directives in order to determine how non-standard workers are often excluded from their scope of application, and the extent to which newer instruments account for a broader variety of employment relationships. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies for the committee on Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL).

Textile workers in developing countries and the European fashion industry: Towards sustainability?

24-07-2020

As fashion becomes increasingly globalised, garment and footwear production has shifted to low-wage, mostly Asian countries. Thanks to lower manufacturing costs, clothes have become increasingly affordable for European consumers. For developing countries, fashion exports create jobs and growth, helping to bring poverty rates down. While there are benefits on both sides, the fashion industry highlights inequalities between the global North and South. With almost unlimited flexibility between countries ...

As fashion becomes increasingly globalised, garment and footwear production has shifted to low-wage, mostly Asian countries. Thanks to lower manufacturing costs, clothes have become increasingly affordable for European consumers. For developing countries, fashion exports create jobs and growth, helping to bring poverty rates down. While there are benefits on both sides, the fashion industry highlights inequalities between the global North and South. With almost unlimited flexibility between countries and factories, European and North American brands and retailers can dictate conditions to developing-country manufacturers, forcing them to cut costs in order to compete. The ultimate victims are factory workers, toiling long hours in harsh and sometimes dangerous conditions, for wages that barely enable subsistence. In many countries, restrictions on trade unions make it harder for workers to assert their rights. With employers reluctant or financially unable to invest in safety, many have died in industrial accidents, such as the Rana Plaza building collapse in Bangladesh, which claimed over 1 000 lives. Decent work has become a priority for the United Nations, the International Labour Organization and other international organisations. The EU supports decent work, for example through its international trade agreements. European consumers and companies are also increasingly interested in sustainable fashion. After the Rana Plaza disaster, over 200 mostly European companies joined the Bangladesh Accord, which has helped to eliminate some of the worst safety hazards. While these are positive developments, a lot more still needs to be done.

Road transport: Enforcement and special provisions for posted workers

07-07-2020

The EU has established a range of social measures applicable to the road transport sector, which aim at improving drivers' working conditions, road safety and competition. To give real substance to these measures, compliance is key. The 2006 Enforcement Directive was therefore adopted to effectively implement the social provisions of the Driving Time Regulation. The present proposal, published in the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' initiative, seeks to remedy some shortcomings ...

The EU has established a range of social measures applicable to the road transport sector, which aim at improving drivers' working conditions, road safety and competition. To give real substance to these measures, compliance is key. The 2006 Enforcement Directive was therefore adopted to effectively implement the social provisions of the Driving Time Regulation. The present proposal, published in the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' initiative, seeks to remedy some shortcomings of the Enforcement Directive, such as non-uniform implementation. Additionally, it puts forward specific rules on the posting of workers in the road sector, to respond to concerns raised regarding the inadequacy of the Posting of Workers Directive, when applied to the road transport sector. The European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report in June 2018. After further debates and procedural developments, the Parliament adopted its first-reading position on 4 April 2019. The Council agreed a general approach in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. After four rounds of negotiations, Parliament and Council reached provisional agreement on the proposal on 12 December 2019, subsequently approved by Coreper on 20 December. The Council formally adopted its first-reading position on 7 April 2020, and on 8 June the TRAN committee recommended Parliament approve it at second reading. The agreed text thus returns to plenary in July for a final vote at second reading. Its adoption would put an end to three years of debate on a complex and controversial proposal. Sixth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Road transport: Driving, breaks, rest times and tachographs

07-07-2020

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the present proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation ...

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the present proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation between Member States and authorities. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report. After further debate and procedural developments, Parliament adopted its first-reading position on 4 April 2019. The Council, on its side, reached a general approach on the proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. After four negotiating rounds, the Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the proposal on 12 December 2019, which was approved by Coreper on 20 December. The Council formally adopted its first-reading position on 7 April 2020, and on 8 June the TRAN committee recommended approving it at second reading. The agreed text thus now returns to plenary for a vote at second reading in July. If adopted, this would put an end to three years of debate on a complex and controversial proposal. Sixth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Transports routiers : règles sociales et règles du marché

06-07-2020

Parallèlement à la libéralisation des transports et à la mise en place du marché intérieur dans le secteur des transports, l’UE a adopté des mesures sociales et des règles du marché. Le 31 mai 2017, pour renforcer ces mesures dans le secteur du transport de marchandises par route, la Commission européenne a adopté un ensemble de trois propositions législatives sur les temps de conduite et de repos, le détachement de conducteurs et l’accès à la profession et le cabotage, dans le cadre du train de ...

Parallèlement à la libéralisation des transports et à la mise en place du marché intérieur dans le secteur des transports, l’UE a adopté des mesures sociales et des règles du marché. Le 31 mai 2017, pour renforcer ces mesures dans le secteur du transport de marchandises par route, la Commission européenne a adopté un ensemble de trois propositions législatives sur les temps de conduite et de repos, le détachement de conducteurs et l’accès à la profession et le cabotage, dans le cadre du train de mesures «L’Europe en mouvement». Le Parlement européen devrait procéder au vote en deuxième lecture, pendant la période de session de juillet, sur un ensemble de textes convenus avec le Conseil pendant le trilogue. Au terme de trois années d’intenses négociations, leur adoption se traduirait par des améliorations des conditions de travail et de repos des chauffeurs routiers, une meilleure application des règles et une concurrence plus loyale entre opérateurs de transport routier.

The platform economy and precarious work

15-06-2020

Platform work has rapidly developed since it first emerged in the EU, though concerns have been raised about the employment and working conditions of platform work and the risk of precariousness it entails. Platform work has, therefore, been identified as a policy priority by European policy-makers. This study presents an analytical literature review that focuses on the challenges and risks of precariousness of platform work and explores possible pathways for EU action. It covers aspects of the ...

Platform work has rapidly developed since it first emerged in the EU, though concerns have been raised about the employment and working conditions of platform work and the risk of precariousness it entails. Platform work has, therefore, been identified as a policy priority by European policy-makers. This study presents an analytical literature review that focuses on the challenges and risks of precariousness of platform work and explores possible pathways for EU action. It covers aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The analysis was prepared at the request of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs of the European Parliament.

Auteur externe

Harald Hauben (ed.), Karolien Lenaerts,Willem Waeyaert

Coronavirus and the world of work

23-04-2020

The coronavirus pandemic and the measures taken to curb its spread have had far-reaching and lasting consequences in different sectors of the economy, in the form of job and income losses or significantly modified working conditions. This briefing gives an overview of the host of problems confronting workers and employers due to the pandemic and its consequences, and presents possible solutions that can be applied at different levels. A set of solutions concerns the level of the individual worker ...

The coronavirus pandemic and the measures taken to curb its spread have had far-reaching and lasting consequences in different sectors of the economy, in the form of job and income losses or significantly modified working conditions. This briefing gives an overview of the host of problems confronting workers and employers due to the pandemic and its consequences, and presents possible solutions that can be applied at different levels. A set of solutions concerns the level of the individual worker or the company employing them. Certain types of occupations, for instance, allow 'going digital' (even if teleworking also has its challenges). In other cases, the company can pay partial or total wages or sick leave to its employees. At yet another level, that of the Member States, short-time work schemes can be introduced or have their scope further extended. Governments can also regulate parameters of teleworking or extend income replacements to groups of workers benefiting from lesser social protection. Through initiatives such as the Support to Mitigate Unemployment Risks in Emergency (SURE) and the Coronavirus Response Investment Initiatives, the European Union is taking an active part in tackling the coronavirus crisis by supporting Member States, companies and workers to face the challenges. At its 16-17 April plenary session, the European Parliament voted on and adopted a number of important coronavirus-related proposals, concerning among others workers in certain sectors (healthcare, fishermen and aquaculture farmers) as well as more flexible use of the European structural and investment funds.

Commitments made at the hearing of Nicolas SCHMIT, Commissioner-designate - Jobs and Social Rights

22-11-2019

The commissioner-designate, Nicolas Schmit, appeared before the European Parliament on 1 October 2019 to answer questions from MEPs in the Committees on Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) and on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON). During the hearing, he made a number of commitments which are highlighted in this document.

The commissioner-designate, Nicolas Schmit, appeared before the European Parliament on 1 October 2019 to answer questions from MEPs in the Committees on Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) and on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON). During the hearing, he made a number of commitments which are highlighted in this document.

Research for AGRI committee - The EU farming employment: current challenges and future prospects (Study + Annex)

15-10-2019

This study outlines the current trends and patterns of farming employment in the EU and discusses possible development paths for the European agricultural labour force. In particular, this study investigates the drivers of and structural changes within agricultural labour markets at regional, national and EU level, building on a range of quantitative and qualitative analysis methods.

This study outlines the current trends and patterns of farming employment in the EU and discusses possible development paths for the European agricultural labour force. In particular, this study investigates the drivers of and structural changes within agricultural labour markets at regional, national and EU level, building on a range of quantitative and qualitative analysis methods.

Auteur externe

A. Maucorps; A. Münch; S. Brkanovic; B. Schuh; J. Dwyer; M. Vigani; A. Khafagy; M. Coto Sauras; P. Deschellette; A. Lopez; S. Severini; F. Antonioli; R. Gaugitsch; J. Powell; K. Kubinakova; M. Derszniak-Noirjean; C. Salasan; M. Gaupp-Berghausen; C.-H. Hsiung; F. Fasching; F. Keringer

Evénements à venir

28-01-2021
Consequences and lessons from COVID-19 crisis for people in residential institutions
Audition -
EMPL LIBE
28-01-2021
Public Hearing "Mind the gap: For equal access to cancer medicines and treatments"
Audition -
BECA
01-02-2021
Eighth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 1-2 February
Autre événement -
LIBE

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