70

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

The Portuguese Parliament and EU affairs

12-01-2021

According to the Portuguese Constitution adopted in 1976, Portugal is a semi-presidential Republic and a parliamentary democracy. It is a unitary state which also includes two autonomous regions (the Azores and Madeira archipelagos) with their own political and administrative statutes and self-governing institutions (Article 6 of the Constitution). The Constitution of the Third Republic created a single representative body: the Assembly of the Republic (Assembleia da República). The Assembly exercises ...

According to the Portuguese Constitution adopted in 1976, Portugal is a semi-presidential Republic and a parliamentary democracy. It is a unitary state which also includes two autonomous regions (the Azores and Madeira archipelagos) with their own political and administrative statutes and self-governing institutions (Article 6 of the Constitution). The Constitution of the Third Republic created a single representative body: the Assembly of the Republic (Assembleia da República). The Assembly exercises national sovereign power alongside the President of the Republic, the Government and the courts. Its primary function is to represent all Portuguese citizens, and as such it acts as the main legislator and is the body to which the executive is accountable. The Assembly and the Government share legislative competence, but the Assembly also has exclusive responsibility to legislate on certain specific matters such as on elections and referendums, the working of the Constitutional Court, political associations and parties, and national symbols (see Article 164 of the Constitution for the full list). This briefing is part of an EPRS series on national parliaments (NPs) and EU affairs. It aims to provide an overview of the way the NPs of EU Member States are structured and how they process, scrutinise and engage with EU legislation. It also provides information on relevant NP publications.

États d’urgence en réponse à la crise du coronavirus: Réponse normative et contrôle parlementaire dans les États membres de l’Union européenne lors de la première vague de la pandémie

04-12-2020

La présente étude a pour objet la réponse normative des 27 États membres de l’Union européenne lors de la première phase de la pandémie de COVID 19 (de mars à la mi-juin 2020) et le contrôle parlementaire sur les mesures adoptées. L’étude révèle que les réponses normatives des États membres face à la pandémie ont globalement été efficaces, étant donné que très peu d’États n’étaient pas dotés, à titre préventif, d’un ensemble de règles permettant aux autorités nationales d’adopter les mesures de confinement ...

La présente étude a pour objet la réponse normative des 27 États membres de l’Union européenne lors de la première phase de la pandémie de COVID 19 (de mars à la mi-juin 2020) et le contrôle parlementaire sur les mesures adoptées. L’étude révèle que les réponses normatives des États membres face à la pandémie ont globalement été efficaces, étant donné que très peu d’États n’étaient pas dotés, à titre préventif, d’un ensemble de règles permettant aux autorités nationales d’adopter les mesures de confinement nécessaires pour faire face au premier pic de la crise sanitaire, et que les États membres dépourvus de ces outils normatifs ont pu adopter rapidement les actes législatifs leur conférant les pouvoirs nécessaires. L’étude révèle également que tous les parlements nationaux de l’Union ont joué un rôle dans la gestion de la pandémie, soit en contrôlant les mesures adoptées par le pouvoir exécutif pour contenir la propagation du virus, soit en exerçant leurs pouvoirs législatifs et budgétaires ordinaires dans le but de fournir au gouvernement les outils normatifs dont il avait besoin pour faire face à la pandémie.

SSM and the SRB accountability at European level: room for improvements?

12-05-2020

The paper distinguishes two contrasting models of accountability, one based on principal-agent relations, which is backward-looking, the other a dynamic and forward-looking model. The paper argues that this second model of accountability is more appropriate for independent bodies like the ECB/SSM and the SRB, operating in technically complex, rapidly evolving environments under conditions of high uncertainty, where parliaments and other political authorities have very limited sanctioning powers. ...

The paper distinguishes two contrasting models of accountability, one based on principal-agent relations, which is backward-looking, the other a dynamic and forward-looking model. The paper argues that this second model of accountability is more appropriate for independent bodies like the ECB/SSM and the SRB, operating in technically complex, rapidly evolving environments under conditions of high uncertainty, where parliaments and other political authorities have very limited sanctioning powers. It then goes on to review the nature and effectiveness of three main forms of accountability as applied to these institutions – administrative, judicial, and political – together with the contribution of external review bodies, such as the European Court of Auditors and the European Ombudsman, to their accountability at European level. Following the dynamic, forward-looking approach advocated above, the paper argues that the best way to improve the accountability of the SSM and the SRB is to request the ECB/SSM and SRB to make the findings of their internal quality assurance and review bodies publicly available (subject to constraints on professional secrecy) and for the EP to use these findings to scrutinize and stimulate public debate about the operations and effectiveness of the two institutions.

Auteur externe

Jonathan ZEITLIN, Filipe BRITO BASTOS

The powers of the European Parliament

04-11-2019

Since its inception in 1951, the European Parliament has come a long way. Initially a consultative body composed of delegations of national parliaments, it became a directly elected institution, obtained budgetary and legislative powers, and now exercises influence over most aspects of EU affairs. Together with representatives of national governments, who sit in the Council, Parliament co-decides on European legislation, in what could be seen as a bicameral legislature at EU level. It can reject ...

Since its inception in 1951, the European Parliament has come a long way. Initially a consultative body composed of delegations of national parliaments, it became a directly elected institution, obtained budgetary and legislative powers, and now exercises influence over most aspects of EU affairs. Together with representatives of national governments, who sit in the Council, Parliament co-decides on European legislation, in what could be seen as a bicameral legislature at EU level. It can reject or amend the European Commission's proposals before adopting them so that they become law. Together with the Council of the EU, it adopts the EU budget and controls its implementation. Another core set of European Parliament prerogatives concerns the scrutiny of the EU executive – mainly the Commission. Such scrutiny can take many forms, including parliamentary questions, committees of inquiry and special committees, and scrutiny of delegated and implementing acts. Parliament has made use of these instruments to varying degrees. Parliament has the power to dismiss the Commission (motion of censure), and it plays a significant role in the latter's appointment process. Parliament has a say over the very foundations of the EU. Its consent is required before any new country joins the EU, and before a withdrawal treaty is concluded if a country decides to leave it. Most international agreements entered into by the EU with third countries also require Parliament's consent. Parliament can initiate Treaty reform, and also the 'Article 7(1) TEU' procedure, aimed at determining whether there is a (risk of) serious breach of EU values by a Member State.

Overview of external briefings on the SSM and SRB during the 8th parliamentary term

06-09-2019

To facilitate the parliamentary scrutiny work, the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (including its Banking Union Working Group) has drawn on external experts to provide briefings on topics of relating to both the SSM and SRM. Prior to December 2015, experts had been requested on an ad-hoc basis, while thereafter, ECON could draw on expertise from two standing panels of experts, one panel for supervisory issues, the other for questions related to bank resolution. Topics for the panel of ...

To facilitate the parliamentary scrutiny work, the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (including its Banking Union Working Group) has drawn on external experts to provide briefings on topics of relating to both the SSM and SRM. Prior to December 2015, experts had been requested on an ad-hoc basis, while thereafter, ECON could draw on expertise from two standing panels of experts, one panel for supervisory issues, the other for questions related to bank resolution. Topics for the panel of experts to be provided in advance of each public hearing are chosen by ECON Coordinators. Since their inception, the two standing panels have in total provided 56 concise written briefing papers on 20 different topics.

Single Supervisroy Mechanism (SSM) – Accountability arrangements and legal base for hearings in the European Parliament - State of Play - August 2019

29-08-2019

This note prepared by the Economic Governance Support Unit provides an overview of the EP’s accountability hearings in the context of the Single Supervisory Mechanism.

This note prepared by the Economic Governance Support Unit provides an overview of the EP’s accountability hearings in the context of the Single Supervisory Mechanism.

Contrôle politique du Parlement sur la Commission européenne: Mise en oeuvre des dispositions du traité

09-07-2019

Les traités offrent au Parlement européen différentes possibilités d’exercer ses pouvoirs de supervision politique sur la Commission européenne et ses actions. L’application de ces prérogatives par le Parlement européen renforce la légitimité démocratique de l’Union européenne ainsi que la transparence et la responsabilité du pouvoir exécutif européen. La présente évaluation actualisée de la mise en oeuvre examine le statu quo des pouvoirs de contrôle du Parlement européen sur la Commission européenne ...

Les traités offrent au Parlement européen différentes possibilités d’exercer ses pouvoirs de supervision politique sur la Commission européenne et ses actions. L’application de ces prérogatives par le Parlement européen renforce la légitimité démocratique de l’Union européenne ainsi que la transparence et la responsabilité du pouvoir exécutif européen. La présente évaluation actualisée de la mise en oeuvre examine le statu quo des pouvoirs de contrôle du Parlement européen sur la Commission européenne. Les cas examinés concernent principalement des questions électorales et institutionnelles, des motions de censure, des questions parlementaires, des commissions d’enquête et des commissions parlementaires spéciales ainsi que des rapports, des consultations et la communication d’informations. Cette étude traite également du contrôle exercé sur les questions budgétaires ainsi que des actes délégués, et aborde le contexte de la procédure législative, des procédures judiciaires et des relations extérieures de l’Union.

Le pouvoir du Parlement européen: Illustration de l’incidence des travaux du Parlement européen au cours de la législature 2014-2019

30-04-2019

Étant l’unique institution européenne directement élue, le Parlement européen est au cœur de la démocratie représentative, le fondement sur lequel repose l’Union européenne. Depuis la création du Parlement, ses pouvoirs ont considérablement évolué, faisant de lui un organe législatif à part entière ainsi qu’un espace de dialogue et d’engagement, dont l’influence se fait ressentir dans la quasi-totalité des domaines d’activité de l’Union. Le présent document offre un aperçu des principaux pouvoirs ...

Étant l’unique institution européenne directement élue, le Parlement européen est au cœur de la démocratie représentative, le fondement sur lequel repose l’Union européenne. Depuis la création du Parlement, ses pouvoirs ont considérablement évolué, faisant de lui un organe législatif à part entière ainsi qu’un espace de dialogue et d’engagement, dont l’influence se fait ressentir dans la quasi-totalité des domaines d’activité de l’Union. Le présent document offre un aperçu des principaux pouvoirs du Parlement européen, montre leurs interactions et illustre par des exemples concrets tirés de la dernière législature (2014-2019) les différentes manières dont le Parlement utilise ses pouvoirs dans ses travaux quotidiens.

Auteur externe

DG, EPRS;

The International Monetary Fund: 15th General Review of Quotas

03-04-2019

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is set to engage in a quota review which is likely to have important institutional, economic and political consequences. Quotas are an essential component of the governance structure of the IMF, defining the influence member countries exert in the decision-making processes, their financial commitments and access to financing in case of need. The 15th review is likely to revolve around two key issues: overall sufficiency of IMF resources and redistribution of ...

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is set to engage in a quota review which is likely to have important institutional, economic and political consequences. Quotas are an essential component of the governance structure of the IMF, defining the influence member countries exert in the decision-making processes, their financial commitments and access to financing in case of need. The 15th review is likely to revolve around two key issues: overall sufficiency of IMF resources and redistribution of quota shares between countries. This paper, prepared by Policy department A, aims to provide a general description of the quota system and the current state of play of the review. It also discusses the dimension of parliamentary scrutiny.

The Scrutiny of the European Defence Fund by the European Parliament and national parliaments

01-04-2019

Since 2016, the European Union has developed a number of new initiatives on security and defence. In particular, the introduction of Permanent Structured Cooperation and the European Defence Fund have been designed to allow the EU to become a more autonomous actor with regard to crisis management, capacity building and protecting Europe and its citizens. Yet the development of these new initiatives raises questions about their overall coherence and the role of parliamentary scrutiny. It is necessary ...

Since 2016, the European Union has developed a number of new initiatives on security and defence. In particular, the introduction of Permanent Structured Cooperation and the European Defence Fund have been designed to allow the EU to become a more autonomous actor with regard to crisis management, capacity building and protecting Europe and its citizens. Yet the development of these new initiatives raises questions about their overall coherence and the role of parliamentary scrutiny. It is necessary to analyse the role of the European Parliament and national parliaments in relation to the scrutiny of the European Defence Fund. There is a need for recommendations on how parliamentary scrutiny can be enhanced at the EU level in the area of security and defence.

Auteur externe

Daniel FIOTT, Security and Defence Editor, EU Institute for Security Studies

Evénements à venir

22-06-2021
AFCO ICM on the Reform of European Electoral Law & Parliament's Right of Inquiry
Autre événement -
AFCO
22-06-2021
The development of new tax practices:what new schemes should the EU pay attention to?
Audition -
FISC
22-06-2021
Perspectives of animal production in the EU
Audition -
AGRI

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