17

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Legal migration to the EU

07-03-2019

Entering the EU as a non-European is not too difficult for people from stable countries. Those planning to visit one or more EU Member States can get in as a tourist, with or without a visa. If the intention is to live and work for a longer period, they can use the many possibilities offered by labour migration. Regular mobility schemes also include provisions for other categories such as students, researchers, au pairs and voluntary workers. People wishing to join a family member who is already ...

Entering the EU as a non-European is not too difficult for people from stable countries. Those planning to visit one or more EU Member States can get in as a tourist, with or without a visa. If the intention is to live and work for a longer period, they can use the many possibilities offered by labour migration. Regular mobility schemes also include provisions for other categories such as students, researchers, au pairs and voluntary workers. People wishing to join a family member who is already residing legally in the EU might even be eligible for family reunification. However, for people coming from countries at war or where democracy is in serious peril, or who happen to live in a non-EU country after fleeing their own country, or who are simply looking for a better life, the options are more limited. Moreover, even when options exist, gaining access to them is not always possible for people who find themselves in precarious, dangerous or even life-threatening situations. In 2015, a record number of people tried to reach Europe by all means, often risking their lives along their journeys. Although the number of irregular arrivals in the EU is back to pre-crisis levels, immigration remains one of the key concerns of European citizens and is expected to remain a challenge for years to come. In order to address this challenge, the EU has embarked on a process of reform aimed at rebuilding its common asylum policies on fairer and more solid ground, strengthening its external borders by reinforcing the links between border controls and security, and renewing cooperation with third countries on migration issues. A forward-looking and comprehensive European immigration policy, based on solidarity and respect for European values, requires a balanced approach to dealing with both irregular and legal migration. The EU is committed to help create more, safe and controlled channels to migration both to help people in need of protection and to address labour market needs and skills shortages adequately.

Revision of the Blue Card Directive

12-12-2017

Attracting highly qualified immigrants to Europe has been one of the EU’s key priorities for several years. However, up until now the EU has not been as successful as other OECD countries. This demand for workers is expected to increase due to the increasing shortage of certain skills and the aging of the EU’s population. The proposed directive, which would replace the 2009 Blue Card Directive, increases the attractiveness of the EU highly skilled migration scheme by expanding its scope, lowering ...

Attracting highly qualified immigrants to Europe has been one of the EU’s key priorities for several years. However, up until now the EU has not been as successful as other OECD countries. This demand for workers is expected to increase due to the increasing shortage of certain skills and the aging of the EU’s population. The proposed directive, which would replace the 2009 Blue Card Directive, increases the attractiveness of the EU highly skilled migration scheme by expanding its scope, lowering criteria for admission, expanding the rights of beneficiaries, and abolishing parallel national schemes. Stakeholders and experts agree with some proposed changes, while others have received more criticism (for example, the abolition of national schemes). The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs has adopted its report, and voted to open interinstitutional negotiations. The Council has also agreed its mandate and trilogue meetings started in September 2017. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

La nouvelle directive «carte bleue» de l’Union européenne

29-09-2016

L’analyse d’impact a clairement établi le besoin d’agir afin de refondre la directive «carte bleue» actuelle. L’AI est étayée par des recherches complètes et solides (sous la forme de 16 annexes) et une expertise externe, ainsi que par une vaste consultation prenant en compte les systèmes d’immigration internationaux visant à attirer les travailleurs hautement qualifiés. Même si toutes les options présentées ne semblent pas viables, la Commission européenne a véritablement tenté de trouver des solutions ...

L’analyse d’impact a clairement établi le besoin d’agir afin de refondre la directive «carte bleue» actuelle. L’AI est étayée par des recherches complètes et solides (sous la forme de 16 annexes) et une expertise externe, ainsi que par une vaste consultation prenant en compte les systèmes d’immigration internationaux visant à attirer les travailleurs hautement qualifiés. Même si toutes les options présentées ne semblent pas viables, la Commission européenne a véritablement tenté de trouver des solutions au problème. Les données limitées, à propos desquelles la Commission est transparente, suggèrent que les preuves quantitatives utilisées dans l’AI, notamment en ce qui concerne les incidences économiques, pourraient nécessiter davantage de recherches. Finalement, un lien avec l’étude d’AI externe qui étaye l’AI de la Commission aurait été utile.

Between the East and the West: Mobility and Migration from the EU´s Eastern Partners

22-04-2016

The Eastern Partners were among the first countries to launch mobility dialogues with the EU. Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine have also engaged in a process of visa liberalisation, which has been completed in the Republic of Moldova and is in its final stages in Georgia and Ukraine. In addition, the Association Agreements with these countries include provisions, which will be applicable from 2017 for the temporary presence – up to two years – of natural persons in EU Member States. Notwithstanding ...

The Eastern Partners were among the first countries to launch mobility dialogues with the EU. Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine have also engaged in a process of visa liberalisation, which has been completed in the Republic of Moldova and is in its final stages in Georgia and Ukraine. In addition, the Association Agreements with these countries include provisions, which will be applicable from 2017 for the temporary presence – up to two years – of natural persons in EU Member States. Notwithstanding the influence of these mobility-fostering legal provisions, legal migration from Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine is concentrated in certain Member States as a result of economic opportunities or linguistic ties. However, with the exception of Moldova, the number of migrants from the countries in question is generally smaller in Member States than in the Russian Federation, where specific legal provisions favour internal migration from members of the Eurasian Economic Union (Belarus and Armenia), and to a lesser extent from members of the Commonwealth of Independent States (Moldova and Ukraine) and Georgia. The countries of origin of those large numbers of migrant workers receive a substantial boost to their economies through personal remittances. This precious source of capital has declined recently, however, owing to falling oil prices and, to a lesser extent, to economic sanctions affecting Russia. Personal remittances from the EU are showing a similar trend, with the exception, again, of Moldova.

The EU Blue Card Directive: Implementation Appraisal

11-12-2015

Labour migration policy has the potential to tackle demographic challenges and labour market shortages. As noted in the European Commission's Work Programme for 2015, the operation of Directive 2009/50 and its evaluation could be the first step towards a new European policy on legal migration. The directive sets the conditions for the work and residence of the third-country (non-EU) nationals in the EU territory but it covers only a specific group of third-country nationals - highly-qualified workers ...

Labour migration policy has the potential to tackle demographic challenges and labour market shortages. As noted in the European Commission's Work Programme for 2015, the operation of Directive 2009/50 and its evaluation could be the first step towards a new European policy on legal migration. The directive sets the conditions for the work and residence of the third-country (non-EU) nationals in the EU territory but it covers only a specific group of third-country nationals - highly-qualified workers and their family members. Despite the various positive aspects that have been introduced by the directive, such as a common European scheme for attracting highly-qualified workers from third-countries to the European Union, based on the available data one can note that there are various challenges to the existing EU Blue Card scheme. The main challenges include the general (un)attractiveness of the EU Blue Card scheme, limited use of the scheme, a lack of coordination between the EU Blue Card scheme and national schemes providing similar rights to the third-country nationals, and the limitation of the rights of the EU Blue Card holders including their intra-EU migration. Another considerable challenge to the scheme is linked with the problems of the transposition among the majority of the Member States. Although the Member States have in the end transposed the directive, their approach is very diverse. These issues present a serious stumbling block to the attractiveness and applicability of the EU Blue Card scheme. While the Parliament's role was limited to a consultation, during the adoption of the current EU Blue Card Directive, new amending legislation would be decided with the Parliament's full involvement under the ordinary legislative procedure.

Switzerland's economy: Clouds on the horizon?

10-12-2015

Switzerland is stable, prosperous, and has the most competitive economy in the world. However, the strong franc and the potential economic repercussions of the February 2014 referendum 'against mass immigration' pose new challenges to Swiss economic competitiveness and growth, which the government elected in October 2015 will have to address in the coming months.

Switzerland is stable, prosperous, and has the most competitive economy in the world. However, the strong franc and the potential economic repercussions of the February 2014 referendum 'against mass immigration' pose new challenges to Swiss economic competitiveness and growth, which the government elected in October 2015 will have to address in the coming months.

Labour Market Shortages in the European Union

22-09-2015

Employment and Social Affairs Committee requested a study on Labour market Shortages in the European Union to provide a comprehensive overview of labour shortages in the European Union as there is evidence that in many countries considerable unemployment coexists with difficult to fill vacancies. This study analyses the different types and causes of labour shortages, their occurrence within the EU-28 and lists possible solutions for employers, Member States and the European Union to counter these ...

Employment and Social Affairs Committee requested a study on Labour market Shortages in the European Union to provide a comprehensive overview of labour shortages in the European Union as there is evidence that in many countries considerable unemployment coexists with difficult to fill vacancies. This study analyses the different types and causes of labour shortages, their occurrence within the EU-28 and lists possible solutions for employers, Member States and the European Union to counter these labour shortages. The study includes a number of cases studies on good practices developed in different Member States. This leaflet presents the key findings of the study.

Third-country migration and European labour markets: Integrating foreigners

16-07-2015

The EU faces long-term economic challenges. Its population is ageing, and its economy is increasingly dependent on jobs requiring high levels of skills. Therefore, during the last ten years, the EU has come to consider managed migration as an increasingly important way to provide European economies with the talent they need. Managing legal migration and integrating third-country nationals has significantly evolved in that time, following a sectoral approach. Several new legal instruments have been ...

The EU faces long-term economic challenges. Its population is ageing, and its economy is increasingly dependent on jobs requiring high levels of skills. Therefore, during the last ten years, the EU has come to consider managed migration as an increasingly important way to provide European economies with the talent they need. Managing legal migration and integrating third-country nationals has significantly evolved in that time, following a sectoral approach. Several new legal instruments have been introduced – most importantly, the Single Permit and the Blue Card Directive, in 2011 and 2009 respectively – in order to facilitate permanent residence and assist in attracting highly skilled workers. The European Union's 'Stockholm Programme' of 2009, and the Commission's 'European Agenda for the Integration of Third-country nationals' of 2011, both pointed to the most crucial element in the successful integration of migrants being their participation in the labour market. Since then, the situation has improved in only a few Member States. Recent data confirm the persistent disadvantages for third-country nationals manifested in their employment and unemployment rates.

EU demographic indicators: Situation, trends and potential challenges

18-03-2015

Europe's share of the global population is declining and its population is ageing. Unemployment is still high, although rates vary between Member States, as well as within them. Women, young adults and older workers have a higher risk of unemployment, while the number of part-time workers is increasing. Migrants represent 7% of the European population and account for around 7% of total employment. They are usually younger and more likely to face disproportionately heavy housing costs, to live in ...

Europe's share of the global population is declining and its population is ageing. Unemployment is still high, although rates vary between Member States, as well as within them. Women, young adults and older workers have a higher risk of unemployment, while the number of part-time workers is increasing. Migrants represent 7% of the European population and account for around 7% of total employment. They are usually younger and more likely to face disproportionately heavy housing costs, to live in overcrowded households and to be more materially deprived than nationals, although, within the group, trends diverge between migrants from other EU Member States and third-country migrants. Differences in the distribution of income are observed, although they are still lower than in many other parts of the world. Almost a quarter of Europeans face the risk of poverty or social exclusion, a risk which has a strong geographical dimension and varies among social groups. If current trends persist, there will be an increasing mismatch, with fewer low-skill jobs on offer to growing numbers of low-skilled workers and fewer qualified candidates to meet increasing demand for high-skilled labour. A shrinking workforce will have to provide for a growing number of retired persons. Migration, which is still substantial, may slow down and possibly shift towards developing countries with strong growth. Finally, the middle class may shrink and more wealth be concentrated in the hands of the richest. These trends present an opportunity for debate on concepts such as 'working age', and the adoption of well-designed comprehensive policies that will strengthen social cohesion and promote solidarity between generations.

Labour Market Shortages in the EU

16-03-2015

This report, provided by Policy Department A to the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, gives an overview of labour shortages, looking at their types and causes, their occurrence within the EU-28 and possible measures to counter them. It finds that there are no overall quantitative shortages at EU-28 level in the wake of the economic crisis, but qualitative shortages, especially relating to skills shortages and mismatch, occur in several regions, sectors, occupations and Member States. Employers ...

This report, provided by Policy Department A to the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, gives an overview of labour shortages, looking at their types and causes, their occurrence within the EU-28 and possible measures to counter them. It finds that there are no overall quantitative shortages at EU-28 level in the wake of the economic crisis, but qualitative shortages, especially relating to skills shortages and mismatch, occur in several regions, sectors, occupations and Member States. Employers and Member States are the prime actors to counter labour shortages effectively, but the EU can play an important supporting role through its influence on intra-EU mobility, by increasing the transparency of the labour market and by using its structural funds as supportive frameworks.

Auteur externe

Dafne REYMEN (IDEA Consult), Maarten GERARD (IDEA Consult), Paul DE BEER (AIAS/UvA), Anja MEIERKORD (ECORYS UK), Marii PASKOV (AIAS/UvA), Valentina DI STASIO (AIAS/UvA), Vicki DONLEVY (ECORYS UK), Ian Atkinson (Ecorys UK), Agnieszka MAKULEC (ECORYS PL), Ulrike FAMIRA-MÜHLBERGER (WIFO) and Hedwig LUTZ (WIFO)

Evénements à venir

30-11-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | How to own the room (and the zoom) [...]
Autre événement -
EPRS
30-11-2020
Hearing on Future-proofing the Tourism Sector: Challenges and Opportunities Ahead
Audition -
TRAN
30-11-2020
LIBE - FEMM Joint Hearing: Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence
Audition -
FEMM LIBE

Partenaires